Academic Upgrading

Have you always wanted to pursue a career in health sciences but you’re missing that one high school credit? Beginning April 2017, Oulton College is happy to bring you free Academic Upgrading to help you achieve your dreams. We will be offering upgrading in Math, Biology, and English to help you pursue a career in the health sciences like Practical Nurse, Primary Care Paramedic, Dental Assistant, Medical Laboratory Assistant, Optician, Pharmacy Technician, Veterinary Technician or Veterinary Assistant.

Students will be taught by a certified teacher and be supported in their learning. Come and experience an Oulton classroom approach. 

A Certificate in Pre College Science Studies is given to a candidate who enrolls in the entire program. Only transcripts will be provided for individual credits. The curriculum is approved by EECD (Education and Early Childhood Development) curriculum and content.

Admissions requirements for Academic Upgrading will be: 

  • Grade 12 diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an admissions advisor

How to Apply

  • Inquire online here
  • Send us your most up to date transcript

Courses that will be offered will include:

  • Foundations of Math 110
  • Biology 112
  • English 122
  • Chemistry 112 (Spring 2018)
  • Basic Introduction to Health Science Careers - include an observation in lab of choice

Course Descriptions:

The Foundations of Math 110 is a pre-requisite for a second Foundations of Mathematics course in Grade 12, providing a pathway designed for entry into academic programs not requiring pre-calculus. It is also a pre-requisite for the pre-calculus pathway. Students develop logical reasoning skills and apply this to proofs and problems involving angles and triangles, the sine law and the cosine law. Students model and solve problems involving systems of linear inequality in two variables and explore characteristics of quadratic functions. Costs and benefits of renting, leasing and buying are explored and investment portfolios are analyzed.

Biology 112 explores the unity and the diversity among living things. In Biology 11, students study the cell as the basic unit of life and the diversity of organisms that make up World’s ecosystems. They also study some of the systems that allow multicellular organisms to maintain equilibrium as they interact with the outside environment. Students will investigate the impact of biology and technology on society and the impact of human activities on the natural world.

English 122 begins with an introduction to four literary theories or perspectives from which to view texts. You will be challenged to stretch yourself to go beyond your personal way of reading and learn to examine texts from different angles or through different "lenses." You will examine autobiographies, biographies, editorials, non-fiction, short stories, poetry, song lyrics, novels, plays and infographics to identify common themes. The course concludes with a research module in which you will look at what makes an essay good, how to narrow a topic focus, how to plan research so it is targeted, how to evaluate and cite sources, and how to choose quotations so you will have an impact with your words. Woven throughout the course is a required independent reading component. You will choose texts and submit a weekly journal report of your reading experiences.

Chemistry 112 is the study of matter, the composition of substances and the changes that substances undergo. Since all living and nonliving things are made up of matter, chemistry is truly about all aspects of existence—life and most natural events. Chemistry 112 first introduces key scientific principles (the skills of scientists and the scientific method of inquiry), and then begins surveying the various ways in which matter is classified—from solids to liquids to gases, substances and mixtures, physical and chemical properties and changes.  Students will become familiar with the periodic table of elements as the quantum mechanical theory and electron configurations are investigated.  Chemical bonding and reactions, molecular shapes and intermolecular forces, Avogadro and the mole, solutions and stoichiometry are introduced. 

The Introduction to Health Sciences course will provide students with the basic knowledge of the variety of careers in health science to consider.  The course is broken down into theoretical and practical components. The theoretical component explores the differences between the various health science professions and important facts about each profession to consider when choosing your career.  The importance of having a good foundation in Math, Biology and English are related to each profession with specific examples.  The practical component involves observation and/or participation in the laboratory component of health science professions that are offered at Oulton College.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

Because of the nature of work of many health sciences, you are encouraged to research your profession of choice before beginning your studies. Considerations to mental and physical health, as well as other requirements for the program or entry to the profession. Admissions advisors can inform you. This short program is designed to provide upgrading opportunities for interested candidates who have not yet achieved the minimum grades in Biology, Math or English (grade 11/12) in order to enter a post- secondary program. 

*Candidates of the academic upgrading- pre science program are not guaranteed admissions into another program. The application process for these will be applied equally.

Academic Upgrading

Have you always wanted to pursue a career in health sciences but you’re missing that one high school credit? Beginning April 2017, Oulton College is happy to bring you free Academic Upgrading to help you achieve your dreams. We will be offering upgrading in Math, Biology, and English to help you pursue a career in the health sciences like Practical Nurse, Primary Care Paramedic, Dental Assistant, Medical Laboratory Assistant, Optician, Pharmacy Technician, Veterinary Technician or Veterinary Assistant.

Students will be taught by a certified teacher and be supported in their learning. Come and experience an Oulton classroom approach. 

A Certificate in Pre College Science Studies is given to a candidate who enrolls in the entire program. Only transcripts will be provided for individual credits. The curriculum is approved by EECD (Education and Early Childhood Development) curriculum and content.

Admissions requirements for Academic Upgrading will be: 

  • Grade 12 diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an admissions advisor

How to Apply

  • Inquire online here
  • Send us your most up to date transcript

Courses that will be offered will include:

  • Foundations of Math 110
  • Biology 112
  • English 122
  • Chemistry 112 (Spring 2018)
  • Basic Introduction to Health Science Careers - include an observation in lab of choice

Course Descriptions:

The Foundations of Math 110 is a pre-requisite for a second Foundations of Mathematics course in Grade 12, providing a pathway designed for entry into academic programs not requiring pre-calculus. It is also a pre-requisite for the pre-calculus pathway. Students develop logical reasoning skills and apply this to proofs and problems involving angles and triangles, the sine law and the cosine law. Students model and solve problems involving systems of linear inequality in two variables and explore characteristics of quadratic functions. Costs and benefits of renting, leasing and buying are explored and investment portfolios are analyzed.

Biology 112 explores the unity and the diversity among living things. In Biology 11, students study the cell as the basic unit of life and the diversity of organisms that make up World’s ecosystems. They also study some of the systems that allow multicellular organisms to maintain equilibrium as they interact with the outside environment. Students will investigate the impact of biology and technology on society and the impact of human activities on the natural world.

English 122 begins with an introduction to four literary theories or perspectives from which to view texts. You will be challenged to stretch yourself to go beyond your personal way of reading and learn to examine texts from different angles or through different "lenses." You will examine autobiographies, biographies, editorials, non-fiction, short stories, poetry, song lyrics, novels, plays and infographics to identify common themes. The course concludes with a research module in which you will look at what makes an essay good, how to narrow a topic focus, how to plan research so it is targeted, how to evaluate and cite sources, and how to choose quotations so you will have an impact with your words. Woven throughout the course is a required independent reading component. You will choose texts and submit a weekly journal report of your reading experiences.

Chemistry 112 is the study of matter, the composition of substances and the changes that substances undergo. Since all living and nonliving things are made up of matter, chemistry is truly about all aspects of existence—life and most natural events. Chemistry 112 first introduces key scientific principles (the skills of scientists and the scientific method of inquiry), and then begins surveying the various ways in which matter is classified—from solids to liquids to gases, substances and mixtures, physical and chemical properties and changes.  Students will become familiar with the periodic table of elements as the quantum mechanical theory and electron configurations are investigated.  Chemical bonding and reactions, molecular shapes and intermolecular forces, Avogadro and the mole, solutions and stoichiometry are introduced. 

The Introduction to Health Sciences course will provide students with the basic knowledge of the variety of careers in health science to consider.  The course is broken down into theoretical and practical components. The theoretical component explores the differences between the various health science professions and important facts about each profession to consider when choosing your career.  The importance of having a good foundation in Math, Biology and English are related to each profession with specific examples.  The practical component involves observation and/or participation in the laboratory component of health science professions that are offered at Oulton College.

 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

Because of the nature of work of many health sciences, you are encouraged to research your profession of choice before beginning your studies. Considerations to mental and physical health, as well as other requirements for the program or entry to the profession. Admissions advisors can inform you. This short program is designed to provide upgrading opportunities for interested candidates who have not yet achieved the minimum grades in Biology, Math or English (grade 11/12) in order to enter a post- secondary program. 

*Candidates of the academic upgrading- pre science program are not guaranteed admissions into another program. The application process for these will be applied equally.

Career Choices

Career Choices

The fast paced world of business always needs qualified and trained accounting professionals. Making sound business decisions based on financial data is crucial for survival.

Accounting professionals are trained to be key members of the business team, helping operations and sales perform their jobs betters with accurate information. Our graduates often find placements in banks and large companies as well as in small businesses, the service industries, government and public accounting.

  • Office Manager
  • Office Administrator
  • Accountant Bookkeeper
  • Payroll Administrator
  • Financial Clerk
  • Variety of business support roles

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Career Choices

The fast paced world of business always needs qualified and trained accounting professionals. Making sound business decisions based on financial data is crucial for survival.

Accounting professionals are trained to be key members of the business team, helping operations and sales perform their jobs betters with accurate information. Our graduates often find placements in banks and large companies as well as in small businesses, the service industries, government and public accounting.

  • Office Manager
  • Office Administrator
  • Accountant Bookkeeper
  • Payroll Administrator
  • Financial Clerk
  • Variety of business support roles

Career Choices

The time is now to start your career in the IT industry.  Employers in every sector are looking for talented developers and programmers.

  • Computer Programmer
  • Website Developer
  • Applications Developer
  • Database Creation

Career Choices

The IT sector is waiting for you and offers lots of jobs, stability, and challenging work.

  • Network Administrator
  • Software Developer
  • Quality Assurance Specialist
  • System Analyst

Career Choices

Qualified and trained business professionals are critical for businesses to thrive and prosper. Business professionals with a solid foundation in management techniques are relied upon to maximize customer service, search and secure new customers, as well as keep operations running smoothly and efficiently.

Our Business Management Program prepares you to excel in any organization, or as an entrepreneur.

  • Management
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Customer Service
  • Marketing
  • Sales
  • Operations
  • Public Relations

Career Choices

Office professionals with a solid foundation in business fundamentals are always in demand and called upon to ensure businesses and organizations are running effectively and efficiently. Our Executive Office Administration graduates are equipped with the skills needed to be an integral part of any administrative team in the workforce. 

  • Executive Assistant
  • Office Co-ordinator
  • Payroll Administrator
  • Office Administrator
  • Accounting Clerk

Career Choices

Our Paralegal/Legal Assistant graduates have gone on to find jobs working with lawyers, crown prosecutors, judges for federal and provincial courts, justice departments, insurance companies, and real estate agencies.

  • Law Offices
  • Real Estate Offices
  • Courthouses
  • Corporate Offices
  • Industrial Relations Offices

Career Choices            

Businesses will always need creative Sales & Marketing professionals to help them think and act outside the box to reach consumers! Our program prepares you for opportunities to make any organization shine through the right combination of public relations, customer service and strategic marketing.  

  • Marketing Coordinator
  • Director of Community Relations
  • Sales Representative
  • Marketing Analyst
  • Product Development Team Member
  • Customer Service
  • Advertising & Promotions

Career Choices

There has never been a better time to work in the exciting Travel and Hospitality industry. In under a year, we give you a career that really takes you places.

At the core of our program is Emerit certification. Emerit’s Tourism Certified Professional (TCP) distinction is Canada’s most sought after credential for tourism professionals. Emerit certification advances your individual skill levels and marketability, while teaching you to generate repeat business, and increase both your revenue and productivity.

  • Cruise Ship Staff
  • Hotel and Resort Agents
  • Travel Agent
  • Flight Attendant
  • Conference and Event Planner

Career Choices

Do you enjoy children and interacting with youth? Looking for a fulfilling career that’s always in demand? Our Child and Youth Care Program can be the first step in finding your calling.

  • Youth Treatment Centers
  • Group Homes
  • Addiction Centers
  • Autism Support Centers
  • Community-based Programs and Schools
  • Educational Assistants
  • Behavioural Specialists

Career Choices

When working with children, compassion and patience are two essential skills. Our Early Childhood Education/Educational Assistant Program is approved by the Province of New Brunswick, and includes courses such as Suicide Intervention, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, ECER’S, ITER’S, SACER’S and New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care.

It’s not unusual for our graduates to complete their Practicum, then start working fulltime right away at the same organization.

  • Operate your own Childcare Centre
  • Childcare Facility
  • Recreation Leader
  • Educational Assistant in Schools
  • Nanny
  • Intervention Worker
  • Family Support Specialist

Career Choices

Graduates from our Family and Community Services Diploma Program will be prepared for employment in the human service, mental health and community living fields. You will learn to build purposeful relationships that promote increased levels on health and wellbeing in individuals, families and groups within the community.

  • Residential Care Worker
  • Adult or Family Support Worker
  • Street Intervention Worker
  • Gerontology Worker
  • Victim Support Worker
  • Crisis Intervention Counselor
  • Community Outreach Worker
  • Non-Profit Worker
  • Transition House Counselor
  • Advocate
  • Life Skills Instructor
  • Career/Employment Counselor

Career Choices

Our Policing and Corrections Foundation Program produces graduates who are ready to make a positive contribution to their community.

  • Provincial and Federal Corrections Officers
  • Military Police Officers
  • Private Investigators
  • Security Firms
  • Sheriff’s department
  • Police Officers

Career Choices

There is a long list of dental clinics across the provinces who have hired Oulton grads.  Our renowned dental program boasts a remarkably high placement rate. You too can graduate with well-practiced techniques, outstanding patient rapport skills, dental vocabulary and lots of hands-on experience to become an integral part of a Dental Health Professional Team.

  • Prepare and maintain dental instruments and supplies.
  • Instruct patients on post-operative and general oral health care.
  • Expose dental radiographs, take impressions, do sealants.
  • Assist in chair side dentistry. 

Career Choices

Dental Hygienists are an essential part of the dental team: they work with the Dentist to ensure good dental health care for patients. Exceptional Dental Hygienist do not just help your oral health while you’re in their chair; they give you good habits to bring with you everywhere else. These are the types of Hygienists we produce at Oulton College.

Our training gives you practiced skills and the ability to build strong patient relationships right away. You will be able to quickly step in and work in any clinical setting.

  • Dental Clinics
  • Community Health Organizations
  • Long-term Care Facilities

Career Choices

Health Care Support is an integral part of any long-term care, community or hospital setting.
Our training gives you practiced skills and the ability to build strong patient relationships right away. You will be able to quickly step in and work in any clinical setting.

  • Health Care Aid
  • Attendant
  • Resident Assistant
  • Continuing Care Assistant
  • Home Support Worker
  • Personal Support Worker

Career Choices

The need for health care is on the rise and as a result the demand for professionals in every sector of the industry is rapidly increasing. Licensed Practical Nurses work under the direction of physician and registered nurses, in order to provide care for the sick, injured and disabled.

  • Hospitals
  • Long Term Care
  • Special Care Homes
  • Community Health Clinics
  • Health-focused Corporations

Career Choices

Our renowned Medical Laboratory Assistant Program is perfect if you’re looking to quickly move from the classroom to the laboratory. We can help you start an amazing career working in clinics, hospitals, research institutions and laboratories.

  • Microbiology
  • Histology 
  • Cytology
  • Hospital Laboratories
  • Private Clinics
  • Research Laboratories
  • Industry Laboratories
  • Phlebotomy Clinics

Career Choices

Medical Office Administrators are often the first people you see when you enter a medical office. They greet you, get you settled in, maintain your records and keep the doctors on track in a sea of waiting clients.

Our Medical Office Administration Program equips you with the skills you need to work productively in a busy health care office or setting.

  • Medical Offices
  • Health and Wellness Clinics
  • Hospitals
  • Dental Offices

Career Choices

Our Optician Program graduates will be in great demand and will go on to find rewarding careers in private clinics and vision care centres. 

  • Optometrist’s or Ophthalmologist’s office
  • Vision Care Centres
  • Operate your own Dispensing Business
  • Large Retail Eyewear Chains
  • Sales Representative for Frame and Lens Distributors

Career Choices

Pharmacy Technicians performs pharmacy related functions, generally working under the direct supervision of a licensed Pharmacist or other health professional. Job duties include dispensing prescription drugs and other medical devices to patients and instructing on their use. Sometimes, Pharmacy Technicians have administrative duties, such as reviewing prescription requests with doctor’s offices and insurance companies to ensure correct medications are provided and payment is received.

Our Pharmacy Technician grads work in a variety of locations.

  • Retail Pharmacies
  • Hospital Pharmacies
  • Long-term Care Facilities
  • Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Plants

Career Choices

Canada has never seen a greater demand for skilled Veterinary Technicians. Veterinary Technicians are vital members of the Veterinary Health Care Team, providing skills in a variety of areas including patient care, laboratory procedures, specimen collection, surgical assisting, anesthesia, radiography, and nutritional support to a variety of pet and laboratory species.

  • Veterinary Offices
  • Livestock Production
  • Equine Practice
  • Diagnostic Laboratories
  • Zoos and Wildlife Parks
  • Veterinary Supply or Sales
  • Pet Food Industry

Career Choices

Emergency Medical services and facilities operate 24/7 and therefore professionals in this field have a great variety of choice and options to dedicate themselves in providing fast and effective response to emergencies.

  • Ambulatory Care and Transportation
  • Hospitals
  • Fire Departments
  • Government Departments and Agencies
  • Manufacturing Firms
  • Mining Companies
  • Other Private Sector Establishments
  • Also as Managers, Supervisors and Directors of Emergency Services

Career Choices

There is a long list of dental clinics across the provinces who have hired Oulton grads.  Our renowned dental program boasts a remarkably high placement rate. You too can graduate with well-practiced techniques, outstanding patient rapport skills, dental vocabulary and lots of hands-on experience to become an integral part of a Dental Health Professional Team.

  • Prepare and maintain dental instruments and supplies.
  • Instruct patients on post-operative and general oral health care.
  • Expose dental radiographs, take impressions, do sealants.
  • Assist in chair side dentistry. 

Career Choices

There is a long list of dental clinics across the provinces who have hired Oulton grads.  Our renowned dental program boasts a remarkably high placement rate. You too can graduate with well-practiced techniques, outstanding patient rapport skills, dental vocabulary and lots of hands-on experience to become an integral part of a Dental Health Professional Team.

  • Prepare and maintain dental instruments and supplies.
  • Instruct patients on post-operative and general oral health care.
  • Expose dental radiographs, take impressions, do sealants.
  • Assist in chair side dentistry. 

Career Choices

When working with children, compassion and patience are two essential skills. Our Early Childhood Education/Educational Assistant Program is approved by the Province of New Brunswick, and includes courses such as Suicide Intervention, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, ECER’S, ITER’S, SACER’S and New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care.

It’s not unusual for our graduates to complete their Practicum, then start working fulltime right away at the same organization.

  • Operate your own Childcare Centre
  • Childcare Facility
  • Recreation Leader
  • Educational Assistant in Schools
  • Nanny
  • Intervention Worker
  • Family Support Specialist

Career Choices

The time is now to start your career in the IT industry.  Employers in every sector are looking for talented developers and programmers.

  • Computer Programmer
  • Website Developer
  • Applications Developer
  • Database Creation

Career Choices

Dental Hygienists are an essential part of the dental team: they work with the Dentist to ensure good dental health care for patients. Exceptional Dental Hygienist do not just help your oral health while you’re in their chair; they give you good habits to bring with you everywhere else. These are the types of Hygienists we produce at Oulton College.

Our training gives you practiced skills and the ability to build strong patient relationships right away. You will be able to quickly step in and work in any clinical setting.

  • Dental Clinics
  • Community Health Organizations
  • Long-term Care Facilities

asdfasdfasdfasdf as fasdf asdf asdf asdf

Career Choices

The fast paced world of business always needs qualified and trained accounting professionals. Making sound business decisions based on financial data is crucial for survival.

Accounting professionals are trained to be key members of the business team, helping operations and sales perform their jobs betters with accurate information. Our graduates often find placements in banks and large companies as well as in small businesses, the service industries, government and public accounting.

  • Office Manager
  • Office Administrator
  • Accountant Bookkeeper
  • Payroll Administrator
  • Financial Clerk
  • Variety of business support roles

Career Choices

The time is now to start your career in the IT industry.  Employers in every sector are looking for talented developers and programmers.

  • Computer Programmer
  • Website Developer
  • Applications Developer
  • Database Creation

Career Choices

The IT sector is waiting for you and offers lots of jobs, stability, and challenging work.

  • Network Administrator
  • Software Developer
  • Quality Assurance Specialist
  • System Analyst

Career Choices

Qualified and trained business professionals are critical for businesses to thrive and prosper. Business professionals with a solid foundation in management techniques are relied upon to maximize customer service, search and secure new customers, as well as keep operations running smoothly and efficiently.

Our Business Management Program prepares you to excel in any organization, or as an entrepreneur.

  • Management
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Customer Service
  • Marketing
  • Sales
  • Operations
  • Public Relations

Career Choices

Office professionals with a solid foundation in business fundamentals are always in demand and called upon to ensure businesses and organizations are running effectively and efficiently. Our Executive Office Administration graduates are equipped with the skills needed to be an integral part of any administrative team in the workforce. 

  • Executive Assistant
  • Office Co-ordinator
  • Payroll Administrator
  • Office Administrator
  • Accounting Clerk

Career Choices

Our Paralegal/Legal Assistant graduates have gone on to find jobs working with lawyers, crown prosecutors, judges for federal and provincial courts, justice departments, insurance companies, and real estate agencies.

  • Law Offices
  • Real Estate Offices
  • Courthouses
  • Corporate Offices
  • Industrial Relations Offices

Career Choices            

Businesses will always need creative Sales & Marketing professionals to help them think and act outside the box to reach consumers! Our program prepares you for opportunities to make any organization shine through the right combination of public relations, customer service and strategic marketing.  

  • Marketing Coordinator
  • Director of Community Relations
  • Sales Representative
  • Marketing Analyst
  • Product Development Team Member
  • Customer Service
  • Advertising & Promotions

Career Choices

There has never been a better time to work in the exciting Travel and Hospitality industry. In under a year, we give you a career that really takes you places.

At the core of our program is Emerit certification. Emerit’s Tourism Certified Professional (TCP) distinction is Canada’s most sought after credential for tourism professionals. Emerit certification advances your individual skill levels and marketability, while teaching you to generate repeat business, and increase both your revenue and productivity.

  • Cruise Ship Staff
  • Hotel and Resort Agents
  • Travel Agent
  • Flight Attendant
  • Conference and Event Planner

Career Choices

Do you enjoy children and interacting with youth? Looking for a fulfilling career that’s always in demand? Our Child and Youth Care Program can be the first step in finding your calling.

  • Youth Treatment Centers
  • Group Homes
  • Addiction Centers
  • Autism Support Centers
  • Community-based Programs and Schools
  • Educational Assistants
  • Behavioural Specialists

Career Choices

When working with children, compassion and patience are two essential skills. Our Early Childhood Education/Educational Assistant Program is approved by the Province of New Brunswick, and includes courses such as Suicide Intervention, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, ECER’S, ITER’S, SACER’S and New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care.

It’s not unusual for our graduates to complete their Practicum, then start working fulltime right away at the same organization.

  • Operate your own Childcare Centre
  • Childcare Facility
  • Recreation Leader
  • Educational Assistant in Schools
  • Nanny
  • Intervention Worker
  • Family Support Specialist

Career Choices

Graduates from our Family and Community Services Diploma Program will be prepared for employment in the human service, mental health and community living fields. You will learn to build purposeful relationships that promote increased levels on health and wellbeing in individuals, families and groups within the community.

  • Residential Care Worker
  • Adult or Family Support Worker
  • Street Intervention Worker
  • Gerontology Worker
  • Victim Support Worker
  • Crisis Intervention Counselor
  • Community Outreach Worker
  • Non-Profit Worker
  • Transition House Counselor
  • Advocate
  • Life Skills Instructor
  • Career/Employment Counselor

Career Choices

Our Policing and Corrections Foundation Program produces graduates who are ready to make a positive contribution to their community.

  • Provincial and Federal Corrections Officers
  • Military Police Officers
  • Private Investigators
  • Security Firms
  • Sheriff’s department
  • Police Officers

Career Choices

There is a long list of dental clinics across the provinces who have hired Oulton grads.  Our renowned dental program boasts a remarkably high placement rate. You too can graduate with well-practiced techniques, outstanding patient rapport skills, dental vocabulary and lots of hands-on experience to become an integral part of a Dental Health Professional Team.

  • Prepare and maintain dental instruments and supplies.
  • Instruct patients on post-operative and general oral health care.
  • Expose dental radiographs, take impressions, do sealants.
  • Assist in chair side dentistry. 

Career Choices

Dental Hygienists are an essential part of the dental team: they work with the Dentist to ensure good dental health care for patients. Exceptional Dental Hygienist do not just help your oral health while you’re in their chair; they give you good habits to bring with you everywhere else. These are the types of Hygienists we produce at Oulton College.

Our training gives you practiced skills and the ability to build strong patient relationships right away. You will be able to quickly step in and work in any clinical setting.

  • Dental Clinics
  • Community Health Organizations
  • Long-term Care Facilities

Career Choices

Health Care Support is an integral part of any long-term care, community or hospital setting.
Our training gives you practiced skills and the ability to build strong patient relationships right away. You will be able to quickly step in and work in any clinical setting.

  • Health Care Aid
  • Attendant
  • Resident Assistant
  • Continuing Care Assistant
  • Home Support Worker
  • Personal Support Worker

Career Choices

The need for health care is on the rise and as a result the demand for professionals in every sector of the industry is rapidly increasing. Licensed Practical Nurses work under the direction of physician and registered nurses, in order to provide care for the sick, injured and disabled.

  • Hospitals
  • Long Term Care
  • Special Care Homes
  • Community Health Clinics
  • Health-focused Corporations

Career Choices

Our renowned Medical Laboratory Assistant Program is perfect if you’re looking to quickly move from the classroom to the laboratory. We can help you start an amazing career working in clinics, hospitals, research institutions and laboratories.

  • Microbiology
  • Histology 
  • Cytology
  • Hospital Laboratories
  • Private Clinics
  • Research Laboratories
  • Industry Laboratories
  • Phlebotomy Clinics

Career Choices

Medical Office Administrators are often the first people you see when you enter a medical office. They greet you, get you settled in, maintain your records and keep the doctors on track in a sea of waiting clients.

Our Medical Office Administration Program equips you with the skills you need to work productively in a busy health care office or setting.

  • Medical Offices
  • Health and Wellness Clinics
  • Hospitals
  • Dental Offices

Career Choices

Our Optician Program graduates will be in great demand and will go on to find rewarding careers in private clinics and vision care centres. 

  • Optometrist’s or Ophthalmologist’s office
  • Vision Care Centres
  • Operate your own Dispensing Business
  • Large Retail Eyewear Chains
  • Sales Representative for Frame and Lens Distributors

Career Choices

Pharmacy Technicians performs pharmacy related functions, generally working under the direct supervision of a licensed Pharmacist or other health professional. Job duties include dispensing prescription drugs and other medical devices to patients and instructing on their use. Sometimes, Pharmacy Technicians have administrative duties, such as reviewing prescription requests with doctor’s offices and insurance companies to ensure correct medications are provided and payment is received.

Our Pharmacy Technician grads work in a variety of locations.

  • Retail Pharmacies
  • Hospital Pharmacies
  • Long-term Care Facilities
  • Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Plants

Career Choices

Canada has never seen a greater demand for skilled Veterinary Technicians. Veterinary Technicians are vital members of the Veterinary Health Care Team, providing skills in a variety of areas including patient care, laboratory procedures, specimen collection, surgical assisting, anesthesia, radiography, and nutritional support to a variety of pet and laboratory species.

  • Veterinary Offices
  • Livestock Production
  • Equine Practice
  • Diagnostic Laboratories
  • Zoos and Wildlife Parks
  • Veterinary Supply or Sales
  • Pet Food Industry

Career Choices

Emergency Medical services and facilities operate 24/7 and therefore professionals in this field have a great variety of choice and options to dedicate themselves in providing fast and effective response to emergencies.

  • Ambulatory Care and Transportation
  • Hospitals
  • Fire Departments
  • Government Departments and Agencies
  • Manufacturing Firms
  • Mining Companies
  • Other Private Sector Establishments
  • Also as Managers, Supervisors and Directors of Emergency Services

Career Choices

There is a long list of dental clinics across the provinces who have hired Oulton grads.  Our renowned dental program boasts a remarkably high placement rate. You too can graduate with well-practiced techniques, outstanding patient rapport skills, dental vocabulary and lots of hands-on experience to become an integral part of a Dental Health Professional Team.

  • Prepare and maintain dental instruments and supplies.
  • Instruct patients on post-operative and general oral health care.
  • Expose dental radiographs, take impressions, do sealants.
  • Assist in chair side dentistry. 

Career Choices

There is a long list of dental clinics across the provinces who have hired Oulton grads.  Our renowned dental program boasts a remarkably high placement rate. You too can graduate with well-practiced techniques, outstanding patient rapport skills, dental vocabulary and lots of hands-on experience to become an integral part of a Dental Health Professional Team.

  • Prepare and maintain dental instruments and supplies.
  • Instruct patients on post-operative and general oral health care.
  • Expose dental radiographs, take impressions, do sealants.
  • Assist in chair side dentistry. 

Career Choices

When working with children, compassion and patience are two essential skills. Our Early Childhood Education/Educational Assistant Program is approved by the Province of New Brunswick, and includes courses such as Suicide Intervention, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, ECER’S, ITER’S, SACER’S and New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care.

It’s not unusual for our graduates to complete their Practicum, then start working fulltime right away at the same organization.

  • Operate your own Childcare Centre
  • Childcare Facility
  • Recreation Leader
  • Educational Assistant in Schools
  • Nanny
  • Intervention Worker
  • Family Support Specialist

Career Choices

The time is now to start your career in the IT industry.  Employers in every sector are looking for talented developers and programmers.

  • Computer Programmer
  • Website Developer
  • Applications Developer
  • Database Creation

Career Choices

Dental Hygienists are an essential part of the dental team: they work with the Dentist to ensure good dental health care for patients. Exceptional Dental Hygienist do not just help your oral health while you’re in their chair; they give you good habits to bring with you everywhere else. These are the types of Hygienists we produce at Oulton College.

Our training gives you practiced skills and the ability to build strong patient relationships right away. You will be able to quickly step in and work in any clinical setting.

  • Dental Clinics
  • Community Health Organizations
  • Long-term Care Facilities

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Career Choices

The fast paced world of business always needs qualified and trained accounting professionals. Making sound business decisions based on financial data is crucial for survival.

Accounting professionals are trained to be key members of the business team, helping operations and sales perform their jobs betters with accurate information. Our graduates often find placements in banks and large companies as well as in small businesses, the service industries, government and public accounting.

  • Accounting Technician.
  • Office Manager
  • Office Administrator
  • Bookkeeper
  • Payroll Administrator
  • Financial Clerk
  • Variety of business support roles

Career Choices

The time is now to start your career in the IT industry.  Employers in every sector are looking for talented developers and programmers.

  • Computer Programmer
  • Website Developer
  • Applications Developer
  • Database Creation

Career Choices

The IT sector is waiting for you and offers lots of jobs, stability, and challenging work.

  • Network Administrator
  • Systems Manager
  • Quality Assurance Specialist
  • System Analyst
  • Cybersecurity Specialist

Career Choices

Our Business Management Program prepares you to excel in any organization,
or as an entrepreneur.

  • Management
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Customer Service
  • Marketing
  • Sales
  • Operations
  • Human Resources
  • Project Management

Career Choices

Office professionals with a solid foundation in business fundamentals are always in demand and called upon to ensure businesses and organizations are running effectively and efficiently. Our Executive Office Administration graduates are equipped with the skills needed to be an integral part of any administrative team in the workforce. 

  • Executive Assistant
  • Office Co-ordinator
  • Payroll Administrator
  • Office Administrator
  • Accounting Clerk

Career Choices            

Businesses will always need creative Sales & Marketing professionals to help them think and act outside the box to reach consumers! Our program prepares you for opportunities to make any organization shine through the right combination of public relations, customer service and strategic marketing.  

  • Marketing Coordinator
  • Director of Community Relations
  • Sales Representative
  • Marketing Analyst
  • Product Development Team Member
  • Customer Service

Career Choices

There has never been a better time to work in the exciting Travel and Hospitality industry. In under a year, we give you a career that really takes you places.

At the core of our program is Emerit certification. Emerit’s Tourism Certified Professional (TCP) distinction is Canada’s most sought after credential for tourism professionals. Emerit certification advances your individual skill levels and marketability, while teaching you to generate repeat business, and increase both your revenue and productivity.

Work in the exciting Travel and Hospitality industry. A career that really takes you places.

  • Cruise Ship Staff
  • Hotel and Resort Agents
  • Travel Agent
  • Flight Attendant
  • Conference and Event Planner

Career Choices

Do you enjoy children and interacting with youth? Looking for a fulfilling career that’s always in demand? Our Child and Youth Care Program can be the first step in finding your calling.

  • Residential Counselor
  • Addiction worker
  • Clinical Case Worker
  • Autism Support Centers
  • Recreational Counselor
  • Educational Assistants
  • Behavioural Interventionist/Specialists
  • Outreach Workers

Career Choices

Graduates from our Human Services Counselor program will be prepared for employment in the human service, mental health and community living fields. You will learn to build purposeful relationships that promote increased levels on health and wellbeing in individuals, families and groups within the community.

  • Residential Care Worker
  • Adult or Family Support Worker
  • Street Intervention Worker
  • Gerontology Worker
  • Victim Support Worker
  • Crisis Intervention Counselor
  • Community Outreach Worker
  • Non-Profit Worker
  • Transition House Counselor
  • Advocate
  • Life Skills Instructor
  • Career/Employment Counselor

Career Choices

Our Policing and Corrections Foundation Program produces graduates who are ready to make a positive contribution to their community.

  • Provincial and Federal Corrections Officers
  • Military Police Officers
  • Private Investigators/Security
  • Security Firms
  • Sheriff’s department
  • Police Officers
  • By law enforcement officer

Career Choices

There is a long list of dental clinics across the provinces who have hired Oulton grads.  Our renowned dental program boasts a remarkably high placement rate.

  • Assist in Chair-side Dental procedures including: Restorative, Endodontic, Prosthodontic, Surgical
  • Prepare and maintain dental instruments and supplies.
  • Instruct patients on post-operative and general oral health care.
  • Expose dental radiographs, take impressions, do sealants.

Career Choices

Dental Hygienists are an essential part of the dental team: they work with the Dentist to ensure good dental health care for patients. Exceptional Dental Hygienist do not just help your oral health while you’re in their chair; they give you good habits to bring with you everywhere else. These are the types of Hygienists we produce at Oulton College.

Our training gives you practiced skills and the ability to build strong patient relationships right away. You will be able to quickly step in and work in any clinical setting.

  • Dental Clinics
  • Community Health Organizations
  • Long-term Care Facilities

Career Choices

Health Care Support is an integral part of any long-term care, community or hospital setting.
Our training gives you practiced skills and the ability to build strong patient relationships right away. You will be able to quickly step in and work in any clinical setting.

  • Health Care Aid
  • Personal CareAttendant
  • Resident Assistant
  • Continuing Care Assistant
  • Home Support Worker
  • Personal Support Worker

Career Choices

The need for health care is on the rise and as a result the demand for professionals in every sector of the industry is rapidly increasing. Licensed Practical Nurses work under the direction of physician and registered nurses, in order to provide care for the sick, injured and disabled.

  • Hospitals
  • Long Term Care
  • Special Care Homes
  • Community Health Clinics
  • Health-focused Corporations

Career Choices

Our renowned Medical Laboratory Assistant Program is perfect if you’re looking to quickly move from the classroom to the laboratory. 

  • Microbiology
  • Histology 
  • Cytology
  • Hospital Laboratories
  • Private Clinics
  • Research Laboratories
  • Industry Laboratories
  • Phlebotomy Clinics

Career Choices

Medical Office Administrators are often the first people you see when you enter a medical office. They greet you, get you settled in, maintain your records and keep the doctors on track in a sea of waiting clients.

Our Medical Office Administration Program equips you with the skills you need to work productively in a busy health care office or setting.

  • Medical Offices
  • Health and Wellness Clinics
  • Hospitals
  • Dental Offices

Career Choices

Find rewarding careers in private clinics and vision care centres. 

  • Optometrist’s or Ophthalmologist’s office
  • Vision Care Centres
  • Operate your own Dispensing Business
  • Large Retail Eyewear Chains
  • Sales Representative for Frame and Lens Distributors

Career Choices

Pharmacy Technicians perform pharmacy related functions under the supervision of a licensed Pharmacist. Job duties include preparing, dispensing, and checking prescription drugs while instructing patients on the use of their devices. Pharmacy Technicians also perform administrative duties, such as performing documentation, accepting prescription requests from prescribers, and ensuring payments for medications are received from insurance companies.

Our Pharmacy Technician grads work in a variety of locations.

  • Community Pharmacies
  • Hospital Pharmacies
  • Specialty Pharmacies
  • Healthcare Organizations

Career Choices

Canada has never seen a greater demand for skilled Veterinary Technicians. Veterinary Technicians are vital members of the Veterinary Health Care Team, providing skills in a variety of areas including patient care, laboratory procedures, specimen collection, surgical assisting, anesthesia, radiography, and nutritional support to a variety of pet and laboratory species.

  • Livestock Production
  • Equine Practice
  • Diagnostic Laboratories
  • Zoos and Wildlife Parks
  • Veterinary Supply or Sales
  • Veterinary Clinics and Hospitals

Career Choices

Emergency Medical services and facilities operate 24/7 and therefore professionals in this field have a great variety of choice and options to dedicate themselves in providing fast and effective response to emergencies.

  • Ambulatory Care and Transportation
  • Hospitals
  • Fire Departments
  • Government Departments and Agencies
  • Manufacturing Firms
  • Mining Companies
  • Other Private Sector Establishments
  • Also as Managers, Supervisors and Directors of Emergency Services

Career Choices

There is a long list of dental clinics across the provinces who have hired Oulton grads.  Our renowned dental program boasts a remarkably high placement rate. You too can graduate with well-practiced techniques, outstanding patient rapport skills, dental vocabulary and lots of hands-on experience to become an integral part of a Dental Health Professional Team.

  • Prepare and maintain dental instruments and supplies.
  • Instruct patients on post-operative and general oral health care.
  • Expose dental radiographs, take impressions, do sealants.
  • Assist in chair side dentistry. 

Career Choices

There is a long list of dental clinics across the provinces who have hired Oulton grads.  Our renowned dental program boasts a remarkably high placement rate. You too can graduate with well-practiced techniques, outstanding patient rapport skills, dental vocabulary and lots of hands-on experience to become an integral part of a Dental Health Professional Team.

  • Prepare and maintain dental instruments and supplies.
  • Instruct patients on post-operative and general oral health care.
  • Expose dental radiographs, take impressions, do sealants.
  • Assist in chair side dentistry. 

Career Choices

When working with children, compassion and patience are two essential skills. Our Early Childhood Education/Educational Assistant Program is approved by the Province of New Brunswick, and includes courses such as Suicide Intervention, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, ECER’S, ITER’S, SACER’S and New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care.

It’s not unusual for our graduates to complete their Practicum, then start working fulltime right away at the same organization.

  • Operate your own Childcare Centre
  • Childcare Facility
  • Recreation Leader
  • Educational Assistant in Schools
  • Nanny
  • Intervention Worker
  • Family Support Specialist

Career Choices

The time is now to start your career in the IT industry.  Employers in every sector are looking for talented developers and programmers.

  • Computer Programmer
  • Website Developer
  • Applications Developer
  • Database Creation

Career Choices

Dental Hygienists are an essential part of the dental team: they work with the Dentist to ensure good dental health care for patients. Exceptional Dental Hygienist do not just help your oral health while you’re in their chair; they give you good habits to bring with you everywhere else. These are the types of Hygienists we produce at Oulton College.

Our training gives you practiced skills and the ability to build strong patient relationships right away. You will be able to quickly step in and work in any clinical setting.

  • Dental Clinics
  • Community Health Organizations
  • Long-term Care Facilities

Career Choices

Veterinary Assistants are an important part of the animal healthcare team. Career opportunities include:

  • Veterinary Clinics and Hospitals
  • Diagnostic Laboratories
  • Zoos and Wildlife Parks
  • Veterinary Supply or Sales

Career Choices

The Massage Therapy Diploma will allow graduates to start their own practice, and also be hired for positions in clinics with other health professionals, spas and wellness centers.

Career Choices

Emergency Medical services and facilities operate 24/7 and therefore professionals in this field have a great variety of choice and options to dedicate themselves in providing fast and effective response to emergencies.

  • Ambulatory Care and Transportation
  • Hospitals
  • Fire Departments
  • Government Departments and Agencies
  • Manufacturing Firms
  • Mining Companies
  • Other Private Sector Establishments
  • Also as Managers, Supervisors and Directors of Emergency Services

You Will Learn

You Will Learn

  • Accounting Principles and Procedures
  • Payroll
  • Communications
  • Business Basics
  • Administrative Procedures
  • Business Math
  • Basic Keyboarding
  • Computerized Accounting
  • Computer Applications
  • Career Development

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You Will Learn

  • Accounting Principles and Procedures
  • Payroll
  • Communications
  • Business Basics
  • Administrative Procedures
  • Business Math
  • Basic Keyboarding
  • Computerized Accounting
  • Computer Applications
  • Career Development

You Will Learn

  • Microsoft.NET
  • HTML5
  • JavaScript
  • PHP
  • MySQL
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012
  • Advanced Computer Programming
  • JAVA Core Programming
  • Web Design and Programming
  • Database Design and Implementation
  • Professional Development 

You Will Learn

  • Network Infrastructure
  • Networking Essentials
  • Hacker Techniques
  • Active Directory
  • Hardware Fundamentals
  • Windows Server 2008
  • Linux, Cisco Router
  • Microsoft Technologies

You Will Learn

  • Business Communications
  • Accounting
  • Management
  • Business Law
  • Human Resources
  • Marketing
  • Advertising and Promotions
  • Customer Service
  • Business Software
  • Advanced Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Outlook
  • Microsoft Access

You Will Learn

  • Bookkeeping
  • Office Procedures
  • Computer Applications (Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access, and Excel)
  • Payroll Administration and Compliance
  • Business Writing and Communications
  • Simply Accounting
  • Career Management
  • Keyboarding
  • Customer Service

You Will Learn

  • Legal Theory
  • Legal Transcription
  • Wills and Estates
  • Legal Accounting
  • Real Estate
  • Corporate Law
  • Family Law
  • Real Property Law
  • Representative Negotiation
  • Civil Litigation
  • Office Administration
  • Legal Database - Canlii
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft Outlook
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Excel

You Will Learn

  • Advertising
  • E-marketing
  • Market Research
  • Ethics in Marketing
  • New Product Development
  • Branding
  • Innovative Marketing
  • Sales Methodology
  • Sales Management
  • Promotional Strategy
  • Customer Service
  • Public Relations
  • Communications
  • Territory Management
  • Computer Applications

You Will Learn

  • The business side of tourism
  • The logistical side of tourism
  • Preparation for industry specific certifications such as World Host, Responsible Beverage, and EMERIT certified professional designation
  • Air Tariffs & Ticketing
  • Travel Fundamentals
  • Automated Reservations
  • Catering, Conventions and Sales
  • Event Planning
  • Worldwide Geography
  • Hospitality Management
  • Health and Safety
  • Intro to Flight Attendant
  • Food and Beverage Management

You Will Learn

  • Strength-based Approaches to Counseling
  • Treatment Planning
  • Suicide Intervention
  • Non-Violent Crisis Intervention
  • Effective Human Relations, Practices, Behavior Management and Interviewing Skills

You Will Learn

  • Play-based learning strategies
  • Child guidance and principles of learning techniques
  • Developmentally appropriate practices
  • New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care
  • Need-specific techniques for working with children of various ages
  • Interpersonal and business practices to support career development

You Will Learn

  • Counseling Advocacy Skills
  • Social Role Valorization
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Group Facilitation/Program Planning
  • Knowledge of Community Development
  • Social Policy
  • Applied Suicide Intervention Skills
  • Non-violent Crisis Intervention

You Will Learn

  • Criminology
  • Emergency Responses
  • Search Warrants
  • Forensics
  • Self-defense
  • Powers of Arrest
  • Correctional Operations

You Will Learn

  • Microbiology
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology
  • Restorative Dentistry
  • Communication
  • Dental Records
  • Clinical Practice
  • Collect and Record Patient’s Health History

You Will Learn

  • Current Technical and Clinical Technologies
  • Patient Communications Skills 
  • Anatomy
  • Pathology
  • Periodontics
  • Radiography
  • Community Histology
  • Oral Anatomy
  • Research
  • Physiology
  • Dental Health
  • Radiography
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Academic English Preparation

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy
  • Physiology
  • Mental Health
  • Human Diseases
  • Long Term Care
  • Acute Care
  • Palliative Care
  • Communications
  • Healthy Living and Nutrition

You Will Learn

  • Adult Physical Assessment: assessment, implementation and health promotion for patients and residents.
  • Phlebotomy
  • Medication Administration/IV Initiation
  • Charting and Documentation
  • Communications & Interpersonal Skills
  • Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics
  • Specialties: Longterm and Acute care competencies.

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Infectious Disease Control
  • Blood and Specimen Procurement & Processing
  • Laboratory Procedures
  • Laboratory Mathematics
  • Microbiology
  • Histology & Cytology
  • Medical Terminology

You Will Learn

  • Medical and Dental Procedures
  • Patient/Client Confidentiality Practices
  • Medical Ethics
  • Efficient Scheduling Techniques
  • Accounting
  • Medical Keyboarding
  • Medical Terminology
  • Pharmacology
  • Dental Team Operations
  • Responsibilities of Dental Office Administrators
  • Dental Terminology
  • Insurance Billing
  • Scheduling of Treatments
  • Office Procedures
  • Medical Transcription
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Outlook
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Word
  • Communications

You Will Learn

• The science behind eye function and vision correction
• Techniques for dispensing subnormal vision devices, contact lenses and eye glasses
• Overview of business training for operating a retail business
 

You Will Learn

  • The science behind eye function and vision correction
  • Techniques for dispensing subnormal vision devices, contact lenses and eye glasses
  • Overview of business training for operating a retail business

You Will Learn

  • How to control the inventory in the Pharmacy
  • How to enter prescriptions into the computer dispensing software
  • How to check prescriptions
  • Techniques of teaching patients how to use devices
  • How to prepare medications for nursing home and hospital patients
  • Pharmaceutical Mathematics
  • Health Sciences
  • Therapeutics
  • Non-Sterile Compounding Techniques
  • Hospital Pharmacy & Sterile Products
  • Pharmacology

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Small and Large Animal Nursery
  • Radiology
  • Immunology
  • Dentistry
  • Emergency and Critical Care
  • Theriogeneology & Genetics
  • Exotics
  • Systemic Diseases

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Communication, Documentation, and Professionalism
  • Pathophysiology (the physiology of abnormal states of the body)
  • Pharmacology
  • Medication Administration
  • Health Assessment and Care in multiple settings
  • Nutrition
  • Paramedicine Terminology
  • CPR and First Aid
  • WHIMIS
  • Non-Violent Crisis Intervention

You Will Learn

  • Microbiology
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology
  • Restorative Dentistry
  • Communication
  • Dental Records
  • Clinical Practice
  • Collect and Record Patient’s Health History

You Will Learn

  • Microbiology
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology
  • Restorative Dentistry
  • Communication
  • Dental Records
  • Clinical Practice
  • Collect and Record Patient’s Health History

You Will Learn

  • How to run your own Childcare Centre
  • Keeping Children Healthy and Safe
  • How to Guide Children’s Behavior
  • How to Encourage Creative Play
  • Observation and Assessment Skills
  • Child Development
  • Inclusive Education

You Will Learn

  • Microsoft.NET
  • HTML5
  • JavaScript
  • PHP
  • MySQL
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012
  • Advanced Computer Programming
  • JAVA Core Programming
  • Web Design and Programming
  • Database Design and Implementation
  • Professional Development 

You Will Learn

  • Current Technical and Clinical Technologies
  • Patient Communications Skills 
  • Anatomy
  • Pathology
  • Periodontics
  • Radiography
  • Community Histology
  • Oral Anatomy
  • Research
  • Physiology
  • Dental Health
  • Radiography
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Academic English Preparation

asdfasdf asdf asdf asdf

You Will Learn

  • Accounting Principles and Procedures
  • Payroll
  • Communications
  • Business Basics
  • Administrative Procedures
  • Business Math
  • Basic Keyboarding
  • Computerized Accounting
  • Computer Applications
  • Career Development

You Will Learn

  • Microsoft.NET
  • HTML5
  • JavaScript
  • PHP
  • MySQL
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012
  • Advanced Computer Programming
  • JAVA Core Programming
  • Web Design and Programming
  • Database Design and Implementation
  • Professional Development 

You Will Learn

  • Network Infrastructure
  • Networking Essentials
  • Hacker Techniques
  • Active Directory
  • Hardware Fundamentals
  • Windows Server 2008
  • Linux, Cisco Router
  • Microsoft Technologies

You Will Learn

  • Business Communications
  • Accounting
  • Management
  • Business Law
  • Human Resources
  • Marketing
  • Advertising and Promotions
  • Customer Service
  • Business Software
  • Advanced Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Outlook
  • Microsoft Access

You Will Learn

  • Bookkeeping
  • Office Procedures
  • Computer Applications (Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access, and Excel)
  • Payroll Administration and Compliance
  • Business Writing and Communications
  • Simply Accounting
  • Career Management
  • Keyboarding
  • Customer Service

You Will Learn

  • Legal Theory
  • Legal Transcription
  • Wills and Estates
  • Legal Accounting
  • Real Estate
  • Corporate Law
  • Family Law
  • Real Property Law
  • Representative Negotiation
  • Civil Litigation
  • Office Administration
  • Legal Database - Canlii
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft Outlook
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Excel

You Will Learn

  • Advertising
  • E-marketing
  • Market Research
  • Ethics in Marketing
  • New Product Development
  • Branding
  • Innovative Marketing
  • Sales Methodology
  • Sales Management
  • Promotional Strategy
  • Customer Service
  • Public Relations
  • Communications
  • Territory Management
  • Computer Applications

You Will Learn

  • The business side of tourism
  • The logistical side of tourism
  • Preparation for industry specific certifications such as World Host, Responsible Beverage, and EMERIT certified professional designation
  • Air Tariffs & Ticketing
  • Travel Fundamentals
  • Automated Reservations
  • Catering, Conventions and Sales
  • Event Planning
  • Worldwide Geography
  • Hospitality Management
  • Health and Safety
  • Intro to Flight Attendant
  • Food and Beverage Management

You Will Learn

  • Strength-based Approaches to Counseling
  • Treatment Planning
  • Suicide Intervention
  • Non-Violent Crisis Intervention
  • Effective Human Relations, Practices, Behavior Management and Interviewing Skills

You Will Learn

  • Play-based learning strategies
  • Child guidance and principles of learning techniques
  • Developmentally appropriate practices
  • New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care
  • Need-specific techniques for working with children of various ages
  • Interpersonal and business practices to support career development

You Will Learn

  • Counseling Advocacy Skills
  • Social Role Valorization
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Group Facilitation/Program Planning
  • Knowledge of Community Development
  • Social Policy
  • Applied Suicide Intervention Skills
  • Non-violent Crisis Intervention

You Will Learn

  • Criminology
  • Emergency Responses
  • Search Warrants
  • Forensics
  • Self-defense
  • Powers of Arrest
  • Correctional Operations

You Will Learn

  • Microbiology
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology
  • Restorative Dentistry
  • Communication
  • Dental Records
  • Clinical Practice
  • Collect and Record Patient’s Health History

You Will Learn

  • Current Technical and Clinical Technologies
  • Patient Communications Skills 
  • Anatomy
  • Pathology
  • Periodontics
  • Radiography
  • Community Histology
  • Oral Anatomy
  • Research
  • Physiology
  • Dental Health
  • Radiography
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Academic English Preparation

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy
  • Physiology
  • Mental Health
  • Human Diseases
  • Long Term Care
  • Acute Care
  • Palliative Care
  • Communications
  • Healthy Living and Nutrition

You Will Learn

  • Adult Physical Assessment: assessment, implementation and health promotion for patients and residents.
  • Phlebotomy
  • Medication Administration/IV Initiation
  • Charting and Documentation
  • Communications & Interpersonal Skills
  • Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics
  • Specialties: Longterm and Acute care competencies.

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Infectious Disease Control
  • Blood and Specimen Procurement & Processing
  • Laboratory Procedures
  • Laboratory Mathematics
  • Microbiology
  • Histology & Cytology
  • Medical Terminology

You Will Learn

  • Medical and Dental Procedures
  • Patient/Client Confidentiality Practices
  • Medical Ethics
  • Efficient Scheduling Techniques
  • Accounting
  • Medical Keyboarding
  • Medical Terminology
  • Pharmacology
  • Dental Team Operations
  • Responsibilities of Dental Office Administrators
  • Dental Terminology
  • Insurance Billing
  • Scheduling of Treatments
  • Office Procedures
  • Medical Transcription
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Outlook
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Word
  • Communications

You Will Learn

• The science behind eye function and vision correction
• Techniques for dispensing subnormal vision devices, contact lenses and eye glasses
• Overview of business training for operating a retail business
 

You Will Learn

  • The science behind eye function and vision correction
  • Techniques for dispensing subnormal vision devices, contact lenses and eye glasses
  • Overview of business training for operating a retail business

You Will Learn

  • How to control the inventory in the Pharmacy
  • How to enter prescriptions into the computer dispensing software
  • How to check prescriptions
  • Techniques of teaching patients how to use devices
  • How to prepare medications for nursing home and hospital patients
  • Pharmaceutical Mathematics
  • Health Sciences
  • Therapeutics
  • Non-Sterile Compounding Techniques
  • Hospital Pharmacy & Sterile Products
  • Pharmacology

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Small and Large Animal Nursery
  • Radiology
  • Immunology
  • Dentistry
  • Emergency and Critical Care
  • Theriogeneology & Genetics
  • Exotics
  • Systemic Diseases

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Communication, Documentation, and Professionalism
  • Pathophysiology (the physiology of abnormal states of the body)
  • Pharmacology
  • Medication Administration
  • Health Assessment and Care in multiple settings
  • Nutrition
  • Paramedicine Terminology
  • CPR and First Aid
  • WHIMIS
  • Non-Violent Crisis Intervention

You Will Learn

  • Microbiology
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology
  • Restorative Dentistry
  • Communication
  • Dental Records
  • Clinical Practice
  • Collect and Record Patient’s Health History

You Will Learn

  • Microbiology
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology
  • Restorative Dentistry
  • Communication
  • Dental Records
  • Clinical Practice
  • Collect and Record Patient’s Health History

You Will Learn

  • How to run your own Childcare Centre
  • Keeping Children Healthy and Safe
  • How to Guide Children’s Behavior
  • How to Encourage Creative Play
  • Observation and Assessment Skills
  • Child Development
  • Inclusive Education

You Will Learn

  • Microsoft.NET
  • HTML5
  • JavaScript
  • PHP
  • MySQL
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012
  • Advanced Computer Programming
  • JAVA Core Programming
  • Web Design and Programming
  • Database Design and Implementation
  • Professional Development 

You Will Learn

  • Current Technical and Clinical Technologies
  • Patient Communications Skills 
  • Anatomy
  • Pathology
  • Periodontics
  • Radiography
  • Community Histology
  • Oral Anatomy
  • Research
  • Physiology
  • Dental Health
  • Radiography
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Academic English Preparation

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You Will Learn

  • Network Infrastructure
  • Networking Essentials
  • Hacker Techniques
  • Active Directory
  • Hardware Fundamentals
  • Windows Server 2008
  • Linux, Cisco Router
  • Microsoft Technologies
  • Cloud computing
  • Office 365 configuration

You Will Learn

  • Bookkeeping
  • Office Procedures
  • Computer Applications (Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access, and Excel)
  • Payroll Administration and Compliance
  • Business Writing and Communications
  • Simply Accounting
  • Career Management
  • Keyboarding
  • Customer Service

You Will Learn

  • Advertising
  • Digital Marketing
  • Market Research
  • Ethics in Marketing/sales
  • New Product Development
  • Branding
  • Innovative Marketing
  • Sales Methodology
  • Sales Management
  • Promotional Strategy
  • Customer Service
  • Public Relations
  • Communications
  • Marketing Analytics
  • Computer Applications
  • Technical Sales

You Will Learn

  • The business side of tourism
  • Preparation for industry specific certifications such as World Host, Responsible Beverage, and EMERIT certified professional designation
  • Air Tariffs & Ticketing
  • Travel Fundamentals
  • Automated Reservations
  • Catering, Conventions and Sales
  • Event Planning
  • Worldwide Geography
  • Hospitality Management
  • Intro to Flight Attendant
  • Food and Beverage Management

You Will Learn

  •   Non-Violent Crisis Intervention
  •   Effective Human Relations, Practices
  •   Behaviour Management
  •   Counselling Skills
  •   Conflict Resolution
  •   Suicide Intervention
  •   Report Writing
  •   Group Facilitation
  •   Program Development and Implementation 

You Will Learn

  • Play-based learning strategies
  • Child guidance and principles of learning techniques
  • Developmentally appropriate practices
  • New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care
  • Need-specific techniques for working with children of various ages
  • Interpersonal and business practices to support career development

You Will Learn

  • Counseling Advocacy Skills
  • Social Role Valorization
  • Conflict Resolution
  • Group Facilitation/Program Planning
  • Knowledge of Community Development
  • Social Policy
  • Applied Suicide Intervention Skills
  • Non-violent Crisis Intervention
  • Hepatitis C and STBBI Intervention and Prevention
  • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Skills Training
  • Ally Training (LGBTQ Awareness & Sensitivity)

You Will Learn

  • Criminology
  • Emergency Responses
  • Search Warrants
  • Forensics
  • Self-defense
  • Powers of Arrest
  • Correctional Operations

You Will Learn

  • Microbiology
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology
  • Restorative Dentistry
  • Communication
  • Dental Records
  • Clinical Practice
  • Collect and Record Patient’s Health History

You Will Learn

  • Current Technical and Clinical Technologies
  • Patient Communications Skills 
  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Pathology
  • Periodontics
  • Radiography
  • Community
  • Histology
  • Oral Anatomy
  • Research/Biostats
  • Physiology
  • Dental Health
  • Radiography
  • Pharmacology
  • Pain Management/Local Anesthesia
  • Nutrition

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy
  • Physiology
  • Mental Health
  • Human Diseases
  • Long Term Care
  • Acute Care
  • Palliative Care
  • Communications
  • Healthy Living and Nutrition

You Will Learn

  • Adult Physical Assessment: assessment, implementation and health promotion for patients and residents.
  • Phlebotomy
  • Medication Administration/IV Initiation
  • Charting and Documentation
  • Communications & Interpersonal Skills
  • Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics
  • Specialties: Longterm and Acute care competencies.

You Will Learn

  •  Medical and Dental Procedures
  • Patient/Client Confidentiality Practices
  • Medical Ethics
  • Efficient Scheduling Techniques
  • Accounting
  • Medical Keyboarding
  • Medical Terminology
  • Pharmacology
  • Dental Team Operations
  • Responsibilities of Dental Office Administrators
  • Dental Terminology
  • Insurance Billing
  • Scheduling of Treatments
  • Office Procedures
  • Medical Transcription
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Word
  • Communications

You Will Learn

  • The science behind eye function and vision correction
  • Techniques for dispensing subnormal vision devices, contact lenses and eye glasses
  • Overview of business training for operating a retail business

 

You Will Learn

  • The science behind eye function and vision correction
  • Techniques for dispensing subnormal vision devices, contact lenses and eye glasses
  • Overview of business training for operating a retail business

You Will Learn

  • How to control the inventory in the Pharmacy
  • How to enter prescriptions into the computer dispensing software
  • How to check prescriptions
  • Techniques of teaching patients how to use devices
  • How to prepare medications for nursing home and hospital patients
  • Pharmaceutical Mathematics
  • Pharmacology
  • Non-Sterile Compounding Techniques
  • Sterile Product preparation
  • Anatomy and Physiology

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Communication, Documentation, and Professionalism
  • Pathophysiology (the physiology of abnormal states of the body)
  • Pharmacology
  • Medication Administration
  • Health Assessment and Care in multiple settings
  • Nutrition
  • Paramedicine Terminology
  • CPR and First Aid
  • WHIMIS
  • Non-Violent Crisis Intervention

You Will Learn

  • Microbiology
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology
  • Restorative Dentistry
  • Communication
  • Dental Records
  • Clinical Practice
  • Collect and Record Patient’s Health History

You Will Learn

  • Microbiology
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology
  • Restorative Dentistry
  • Communication
  • Dental Records
  • Clinical Practice
  • Collect and Record Patient’s Health History

You Will Learn

  • How to run your own Childcare Centre
  • Keeping Children Healthy and Safe
  • How to Guide Children’s Behavior
  • How to Encourage Creative Play
  • Observation and Assessment Skills
  • Child Development
  • Inclusive Education

You Will Learn

  • Microsoft.NET
  • HTML5
  • JavaScript
  • PHP
  • MySQL
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012
  • Advanced Computer Programming
  • JAVA Core Programming
  • Web Design and Programming
  • Database Design and Implementation
  • Professional Development 

You Will Learn

  • Current Technical and Clinical Technologies
  • Patient Communications Skills 
  • Anatomy
  • Pathology
  • Periodontics
  • Radiography
  • Community Histology
  • Oral Anatomy
  • Research
  • Physiology
  • Dental Health
  • Radiography
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Academic English Preparation

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy
  • Physiology
  • Veterinary Medical Terminology
  • Husbandry
  • Office Administration
  • Surgical Assisting

 

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy
  • Physiology
  • Mental Health
  • Human Diseases
  • Long Term Care
  • Acute Care
  • Palliative Care
  • Communications
  • Healthy Living and Nutrition

You Will Learn

  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Communication, Documentation, and Professionalism
  • Pathophysiology (the physiology of abnormal states of the body)
  • Pharmacology
  • Medication Administration
  • Health Assessment and Care in multiple settings
  • Nutrition
  • Paramedicine Terminology
  • CPR and First Aid
  • WHIMIS
  • Non-Violent Crisis Intervention
  • French Language Training through Université de Moncton.

Course Description

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Business Communication teaches you how to plan, organize and write effective, “reader friendly” business documents appropriate for use in today’s global business environment. You will learn how to write business letters, memos, reports and electronic messages. Emphasis will also be placed on proper grammar, punctuation and sentence structure.

CAREER MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to prepare Students for a two week On-Job-Training and for continued success in a business environment. Students will prepare a resume, research employment opportunities, apply for jobs, undertake a job interview and evaluate their own performance in the job application process.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I
This course will focus on the theory and practice of recording and reporting financial transactions for the purpose of preparing financial statements. The program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II
This course will focus on accounting for various types of businesses, such as partnership, sole proprietor and corporations, as well as liabilities and equity portions of the balance sheet. This course will build on BA110 and cover more complicated and diverse transactions and accounting issues.

COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING
The objective of this course is to provide the student with the basic accounting information necessary to understand how the business process is reflected in financial statements. The student will develop applied skills in analyzing business transactions to closing entries for a sole proprietor. To reach the course objective, the program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

APPLIED ACCOUNTING
In this course, the accounting student will apply all previous knowledge to complete a one month accounting cycle for a business. It will include actual documents, memos, instructions, and procedures of a simulated business.

INTRODUCTION to KEYBOARDING
This course will introduce students to touch keyboarding. The goal will be to have students type accurately to a speed of at least 30 words per minute.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, and financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

OFFICE PROCEDURES
This course will provide the student with the fundamental skills and knowledge required to succeed in the business office environment. Today's office environment requires professional people who are trained in technical office skills, interpersonal skills, and who can perform the associated duties with confidence, accuracy, and professionalism.

PAYROLL
This course is intended to provide students with a solid understanding of Canadian payroll practices and procedures. Payroll deductions, payroll taxes, remittances and payroll allowances and benefits to employees will be covered. Calculating net pays with all the deductions will also be covered, as well as records of employments, payroll record keeping and payroll journal entries.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

Students are given the opportunity to acquire internationally recognized Microsoft Certifications.

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Business Communication teaches you how to plan, organize and write effective, “reader friendly” business documents appropriate for use in today’s global business environment. You will learn how to write business letters, memos, reports and electronic messages. Emphasis will also be placed on proper grammar, punctuation and sentence structure.

CAREER MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to prepare Students for a two week On-Job-Training and for continued success in a business environment. Students will prepare a resume, research employment opportunities, apply for jobs, undertake a job interview and evaluate their own performance in the job application process.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I
This course will focus on the theory and practice of recording and reporting financial transactions for the purpose of preparing financial statements. The program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II
This course will focus on accounting for various types of businesses, such as partnership, sole proprietor and corporations, as well as liabilities and equity portions of the balance sheet. This course will build on BA110 and cover more complicated and diverse transactions and accounting issues.

COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING
The objective of this course is to provide the student with the basic accounting information necessary to understand how the business process is reflected in financial statements. The student will develop applied skills in analyzing business transactions to closing entries for a sole proprietor. To reach the course objective, the program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

APPLIED ACCOUNTING
In this course, the accounting student will apply all previous knowledge to complete a one month accounting cycle for a business. It will include actual documents, memos, instructions, and procedures of a simulated business.

INTRODUCTION to KEYBOARDING
This course will introduce students to touch keyboarding. The goal will be to have students type accurately to a speed of at least 30 words per minute.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, and financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

OFFICE PROCEDURES
This course will provide the student with the fundamental skills and knowledge required to succeed in the business office environment. Today's office environment requires professional people who are trained in technical office skills, interpersonal skills, and who can perform the associated duties with confidence, accuracy, and professionalism.

PAYROLL
This course is intended to provide students with a solid understanding of Canadian payroll practices and procedures. Payroll deductions, payroll taxes, remittances and payroll allowances and benefits to employees will be covered. Calculating net pays with all the deductions will also be covered, as well as records of employments, payroll record keeping and payroll journal entries.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

Students are given the opportunity to acquire internationally recognized Microsoft Certifications.

Course Descriptions

WEB DESIGN USING HTML5, CSS3 AND JAVASCRIPT
The emphasis of this module is to teach the students how to build well formatted websites using HTML5 (structure of website), Cascading Style Sheets (look and format), and JavaScript (dynamic user interaction).

Students will learn to:

  • Develop cross-browser (works in all browsers: Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, Opera) websites using XHTML, HTML5 and CSS3
  • Add dynamic user interaction using JavaScript libraries (JQuery, Prototype, Lightbox, etc)
  • Validate user input using JavaScript
  • Upload a Website to their web host
  • Configure a web server (Apache, Internet Information Services) for hosting website
  • Optimize a website for Search Engine Ranking (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.)
  • Create and maintain their own website
  • Optimize document layout for usability and accessibility
  • Validate HTML5 and CSS3 code
  • Work in a team environment with tasks and timelines, deadlines, etc.
  • Use Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 Integrated Development Environment to create websites

BUILDING WEB APPLICATIONS USING PHP AND MYSQL
In this module the students will continue to apply the techniques learned in the Web Design module with an emphasis on creating data-driven websites like a Shopping Cart, a Blog, a Content Management System, etc. using the PHP web programming language and the MySQL database server.

The students will learn to:

  • Configure Apache and PHP
  • Deploy a Web Site to the Web Server
  • Work with Strings, Numbers, and Constants
  • Work with Conditionals, Operator, Loops, and Arrays
  • Process and Validate Form Data
  • Debug and Handle Errors
  • Create dynamic, data-driven desktop Web Sites and Mobile Web Sites with MySQL
  • Handle Email and File Uploads
  • Use Sessions and Cookies
  • Secure PHP, Apache, and MySQL
  • Work with Regular Expression to Validate Inputs
  • Implement jQuery and JSON into Web Application
  • Work in a team environment with project proposals, tasks, timelines, deadlines, etc...
  • Use NetBeans Integrated Development Environment to create dynamic websites
  • Use MySQL Administration Tools to manage databases

DATABASE DESIGN AND MICROSOFT SQL SERVER 2012
This module is composed of two parts:

  1. Database Design: In this module, students will learn the techniques necessary to design and built a good SQL Server database using Entity Modeling and Relational Design techniques. Students will learn how to use the Microsoft Visio 2010 tool to design database models using the Chen and Crow’s foot models.
  2. Querying and Programming a Microsoft SQL Server 2012 database: In this module the students will learn how to implement a database from a conceptual model. Student will learn how to query, implement and maintain a database using the SQL (Structured Query Language) language. Students will be using the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio tool.

DEVELOPING ENTERPRISE WEB SOLUTIONS WITH ASP.NET 4.5
This course focuses on using the Microsoft Visual Studio® .NET environment and the Microsoft .NET platform to create an ASP.NET Web application that delivers dynamic content to a website.

The students will learn to:

  •  
  • Build dynamic SQL Server data-driven Websites
  • Create customizable Online Shopping Carts, Portals, Blogs, etc.
  • Debug and test ASP.NET web applications
  • Work with ADO.NET Data Sources and Data Controls
  • Create and consume Web Services
  • Incorporate AJAX/JQuery technology into ASP.NET applications
  • Validate user input using validation controls
  • Work with Master Pages, skins and themes
  • Authenticate and secure websites
  • Incorporate profiles, personalization, and membership services
  • Configure and deploy website to online hosting services
  • Work in a team environment (with deadlines, deliverables, and timelines) to build an SQL Server data-driven Web Application
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, and project management skills
  • Use the Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 Integrated Development Environment

OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA
This module is divided up into 2 parts:

JAVA CORE PROGRAMMING
In this module, students will learn to build Desktop Applications for different platforms (Windows, Linux, and Macintosh).

Students will learn:

  • The Core Java Programming packages
  • Object oriented software design techniques (Classes, Objects, Interfaces)
  • To design a Graphical User Interface
  • To create data-driven software
  • To use the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment for building desktop applications.

ANDROID PROGRAMMING
In this module, students will continue applying their knowledge from the Java Core module with an emphasis on building applications for the Android Platform.

Students will learn to:

  • Install and configure the Android development environment
  • Create Android activities and XML views (the screen the user sees and interacts with)
  • Handle touch/tap, long touch and swipe events
  • Work with graphic elements to accommodate various Android versions and screens sizes/resolutions
  • Work with the SQLite Database
  • Add animation to the app elements
  • Use audio and video in your app

BUILDING CROSS-PLATFORM MOBILE APPS USING JQUERY MOBILE AND PHONEGAP
The goal of this course is to provide students with the tools and knowledge to build mobile web applications using the jQuery Mobile framework and to use the PhoneGap framework to build Android Apps.

The students will learn to:

  • Create pages in jQuery Mobile
  • Add Buttons, Toolbars, and Navigation to jQuery Mobile Web Site
  • Create jQuery Mobile Forms
  • Add Dialogs and Listviews
  • Work with jQuery Mobile Themes
  • Understand the jQuery Mobile and PhoneGap API's
  • Work with jQuery Mobile Events, Methods, and Properties
  • Build, Test, Debug, and Deploy Mobile Web Apps (Device, Simulator, and Browser)
  • Use PhoneGap and jQuery Mobile to build Android Apps

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATION
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Business Communication teaches you how to plan, organize and write effective “reader friendly” business documents appropriate for use in today’s global business environment. You will learn how to write business letters, memos, reports, and electronic messages. Emphasis will also be placed on proper grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.

CAREER MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to prepare students for a two week On-Job-Training and for continued success in a business environment. Students will prepare a resume, research employment opportunities, prepare and apply for jobs, undertake a job interview, and evaluate their own performance in the job application process.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, and financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I
This course will focus on the theory and practice of recording and reporting financial transactions for the purpose of preparing financial statements. The program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

INTRODUCTION TO KEYBOARDING
This course will introduce students to touch keyboarding. The goal will be to have students type accurately to a speed of at least 30 words per minute.

BUSINESS LAW
This course will provide general overview of legal aspects of business. The law concerning contracts in various situations will be dealt with. The course is designed to give the student an understanding of business law, including consumer protection legislation, and the general legal climate in Canada.

BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS
This course introduces the students to the work performed by managers and supervisors in different industries. Students explore management concepts of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Through a series of lectures and case studies, students learn to apply the concepts to workplace situations.

HUMAN RESOURCES
This course introduces the student to the work performed by Human Resource practitioners. Students explore the concepts pertaining to Human Resource Management, such as staffing, labour relations, total compensation issues, organizational development, staff training, and work place health and safety.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course explores the essential skills required for an entrepreneur to start a business. Writing a business plan, selecting a business name, registering business, obtaining taxation and a business number are examined. Various federal, provincial, and local business regulations that an entrepreneur must take into consideration when starting a new business including laws concerning copyrights, patents, trademarks are studied. The importance of preparing a good business plan including cash flow and sales projections, and pro forma financial statements are introduced. Student entrepreneurs may also be eligible for a $15,000 grant or a repayable unsecured loan from ACOA through their Young Entrepreneur’s Connection program.

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATION
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Students in the Business Communication course learn how to plan, organize and write effective “reader friendly” business documents appropriate for use in today’s global business environment. They will learn to write business letters, memos, reports, and electronic messages. Emphasis will also be placed on proper grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.

CAREER MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to prepare Executive Office Administration Students for a two week On-Job-Training and for continued success in a business environment. Students will prepare a resume, research employment opportunities, and apply for jobs, undertake a job interview, and evaluate their own performance in the job application process.

OFFICE PROCEDURES
This course will provide the Administrative Assistant with the additional knowledge and more opportunity to apply and build on the skills required to succeed in the business office environment. Today's office environment requires professional people who are trained in technical office skills, interpersonal skills, and who can perform the associated duties with confidence, accuracy, and professionalism.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I
This course will focus on the theory and practice of recording and reporting financial transactions for the purpose of preparing financial statements. The program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING
Students will use accounting software (Simply Accounting) which provides a practical, hands-on introduction to Simply Accounting. Students learn how to set up a company’s books, enter historical information, process current transactions, perform month end and year end transactions, and produce financial statements. They will be introduced to the following modules: general, receivable, payable, payroll, inventory and project.

KEYBOARDING
This aspect of the course places emphasis on proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is also placed on speed and accuracy by the development of skills in typing a variety of business documents. Students must reach 50 words per minute in order to graduate.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

BUSINESS WRITING
This course is designed to help students upgrade or refresh their knowledge in general business correspondence by reviewing principles of grammar, correspondence writing, and rules of on-line communication.

PAYROLL
This course, which assumes an introductory knowledge of recording financial transactions in accounting on the part of the student, is intended to provide the student with an in-depth knowledge of Canadian payroll practices and procedures. The course will be taught to the Canadian Payroll administration’s curriculum and may lead to the nationally recognized certificate as a Payroll Administer. The contract of employment, employment laws, payroll deductions, payroll taxes and remittances, payroll allowances and benefits to employees, employment insurance, workers compensation, records of employment, payroll recordkeeping, payroll journal entries and end of year procedures will be covered in order to provide the necessary competencies to create and maintain payroll systems.

Course Descriptions

ADVANCED KEYBOARDING
This aspect of the course places emphasis on proper keyboarding techniques, mastery of the keyboard, and operation of the computer. Emphasis is also placed on speed and accuracy by the development of skill in typing a variety of office documentation, including letters, memos, reports and tables.

LEGAL TRANSCRIPTION
The student learns to use modern dictating equipment. Transcription skills, retention skills, and the ability to follow oral instruction are practiced. The production of typed, ready-to-mail copies from machine dictation is stressed.

CONFLICT RESOLUTION – AN INTRODUCTION
This module of the course introduces the student to conflict resolutions skills. Even in the most traditional of practices, the concept of resolution through first mediation, then arbitration, and lastly adjudication, has reached a new level of acceptance. The student is provided with the tools necessary to assist them in becoming a key member of the legal team that recognizes the importance of conflict resolution in the most expeditious and just disposition of their clients concerns.

LEGAL DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND OFFICE PROCEDURES

- OFFICE PROCEDURES
The student learns the intricacies of the law office environment. They are introduced to the various staff members, the associates and the partners within the firm. To assist them in becoming a valuable member of a team in the legal community, they learn to recognize the various duties of each position and to appreciate the responsibilities of members of the staff within the legal profession. They receive an introduction to the preparation of legal documents, with an emphasis on proper formatting, accuracy, and proofreading skills. They are taught the steps involved in opening files for clients and maintaining those files in the areas of law which they are introduced to in the other modules of the course. The student learns the basics of legal accounting. The student becomes familiar with billable time, disbursements and accounts to clients, through scenarios from typical files at a law firm. They are introduced to PC-Law, a popular legal accounting program and taught how to apply the legal accounting knowledge to that particular program. Time management, an essential skill in the legal environment, is taught with a realistic approach based on the impact of real life situations on the ability to record and bill time.

- CIVIL LITIGATION
The student learns the basic steps on a typical civil litigation file, from opening the file and interviewing clients, to commencing proceedings and drafting pleadings. The student will explore the Rules of Court of New Brunswick. They learn to distinguish between counter claims, cross-claims and third party claims; actions, applications and motions; and judgments, default judgments and summary judgments. They explore the discovery process, pre-trial procedures, trial preparation and costs to be awarded.

- FAMILY LAW
The student learns how to navigate the procedural and transactional aspects of family law that they will encounter in the workplace. Students learn how to deal with divorce, custody and access issues with compassion while maintaining their professionalism. Separation agreements, financial statements and support orders are drafted and dissected to determine the correlation between the elements comprising them.

- WILLS AND ESTATES
The student learns the basics of estate planning, with a concentration on Wills and Powers of Attorney. Basic Will clauses are introduced and students prepare Wills based on typical scenarios. The student is introduced to the necessary forms to request Letters Probate with respect to a Last Will & Testament or Letters of Administration for a person who dies intestate (without a Will).

- CORPORATE LAW
The student learns the steps involved in incorporating a company, with an emphasis on the information required for completing forms to apply for the incorporation. By-laws, resolutions, minute books and share registers are prepared and maintained for a typical “small business” corporation.

REAL ESTATE AND PROPERTY LAW
The student is introduced to the area of real property law through real life scenarios. This module emphasizes the Land Titles System in New Brunswick, one of the most technologically advanced registry systems in the country. A historical look at the registry systems in this country, in stark contrast to the on-line PLANET browser maintained by Service New Brunswick, gives the student a well-rounded appreciation of all types of registries. The Corporate, Personal Property and Real Property Registries are accessed on-line throughout the module to reinforce how the registries work. The student learns the basic steps in opening and maintaining files, closing the property transaction and reporting to the client and their financial institution. After this introduction, the students work with their peers to complete “closings” based on typical scenarios, preparing all correspondence, documents and reports required.

LEGAL THEORY
This covers such areas of the law as an introduction to the common law legal system; the criminal law process; family law; contracts; torts; corporate law; and property law, as well as a general review of New Brunswick Statutes.

LEGAL RESEARCH
Students will learn how to use the most popular subscription legal database, Quicklaw, to research cases from every jurisdiction in Canada. Students will then learn how to prepare legal briefs of caselaw and to prepare submissions to a Court in support of legal arguments. Quicklaw is the research database of choice of most law firms in Canada.

SELF-DIRECTED STUDIES
This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire duration of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Emphasis in this area is placed on giving the student competence in Microsoft Windows and in Windows related software, which, increasingly, is becoming the software of choice for most of today’s business offices. The student becomes familiar with the operation of Microsoft’s latest office software Office2007, which includes Word, Excel, Power Point, and Outlook. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively.

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATION
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, and financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

PROFESSIONAL SALES
The role of sales has changed dramatically over the last decade, with the new image of a sales person being that of someone who is highly professional and looking to provide the customer with products or services that match their needs. The success of a sales professional hinges on his or her ability to understand the exact needs and wants of the customer and to align these with his or her product offering. The variety of sales tools will be identified. Much of the focus of the course will be on taking care of the customer through exceptional customer service.

SALES MANAGEMENT
This is a comprehensive course in sales management principles and methods featuring the allocation of priorities to the company’s sales objectives and responsibilities; formulation of sales policies; the task of planning, organizing, staffing and controlling the work of the field sales force. Understanding the human dynamic in managing salespeople and discussing some of the opportunities and challenges that sales managers face in their day-to-day work. Discussing the role of sales management in the broader corporate environment and the career opportunities that are available working in the sales and sales management functions. The course also reinforces the need for sales managers to display strong ethical behaviour with customers and employees alike.

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT
This course examines the concept of customer relationship management (CRM), its evolution and implementation. The approach is analytical and managerial, and covers: understanding issues, tools, techniques and terminology; establishment, management, mining and analysis of customer databases; assessing customer evaluation and establishing metrics; identifying, defining and understanding customer segments; estimating profitability and designing targeted marketing campaigns and customer communications. Customer relationship management explores database planning, design and creation, and focuses on the role of a CRM in a firm’s marketing strategy, with emphasis on customer relationship building and service.

MARKETING
This course provides students with their first exposure to the key concepts and theories of marketing. Through a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, guest speakers and role play, along with learning exercises such as case analyses, presentations (group and solo), a test, and a major marketing project, students will gain the knowledge to work at junior levels in the marketing and communications field.

PROMOTIONAL STRATEGY
This course covers the marketing concept of promotion, in all its form. Integrated marketing communications is introduced as the coordinating force in promotion; advertising, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling and events are explored as the key promotional techniques. The promotional process is covered from the stand- point of the firm. The course will also cover the nature and the process of communications and the impact it has on the individual and the organizational consumer.

MARKETING RESEARCH
This course provides a detailed study of the objectives, principles and methods of marketing research. Marketing research is covered from the perspective of the user as well as the practitioner of the research. This course focuses principally on providing quality information which managers can act upon. Computer based applications of mathematical and statistical techniques are used.

BUSINESS MARKETING
Firms that operate in the business-to-business marketplace are increasingly recognizing the importance of marketing’s role and contribution as a critical aspect of their operation to help them achieve their goals. The business marketing world differs in many ways from the consumer world and the company competitiveness and reputation in the business-to-business marketplace is usually a direct result of their marketing competence. This course provides the knowledge and understanding of key business- to-business market principles and process and the methodology of applying the marketing drivers.

INTERNATIONAL SALES AND MARKETING
This course focuses on theoretical and practical techniques used in selling goods and services in the international marketplace. Emphasis will be on dealing with various cultures and ethnic groups that make up the international market. Attention will be paid to adapting theoretical selling skills to fit different cultural requirements of the market, in order to achieve effective partnerships culminating in long-term relations. This class also examines the international activities of firms from a marketing perspective. While Canada is a very active trading nation in terms of both importing and exporting, the focus of this course will primarily be on exporting, particularly from the perspective of small- and medium-sized companies.

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS
Students examine the exciting and fast-moving world of advertising and promotion. Emphasis is on the big picture, methods and media for communication, motivation and appeal, advertising objectives, copywriting, federal regulations, and competition.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

Course Descriptions

TRAVEL APPLICATIONS
This program provides travel students the opportunity to gain competency in Microsoft Windows XP and Office 2013. The students become familiar with the operation of Word PowerPoint, and Excel. Students also learn to use the Internet as an effective business tool, regarding social media and travel blogs.

HUMAN RELATIONS AND BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Students are provided with the opportunity to develop effective communication skills. The students prepare a resume, write business letters, and execute oral presentations. In the Human Relations component, emphasis is placed upon learning the skills required to perform effectively in organizations.

CUSTOMER SERVICE
This course will provide an understanding of the customer service industry and trends as well as help the student develop the skills and attitudes necessary to become a customer service professional. The importance of communication, problem solving, motivation and customer retention in the changing marketplace is also discussed and the mastery of these skills and abilities is emphasized.

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
Students will learn the characteristics of the hospitality industry. They will study the proper terminology, accommodation sectors, corporate philosophy, departmental and management structures and market segments. This will familiarize the students with the daily operations and provide a general overview of the hospitality components. They will also develop Human Resources, (training and motivational) skills in order to provide a positive and professional experience for our internal and external guests.

EVENT PLANNING
In this course, students will learn the principles involved in meeting planning, as well as understanding the dynamics and requirements of groups. Students will be introduced to the principle of selling, coordinating and delivering special events to the group market, in both a hotel setting and as an independent business.

FLIGHT ATTENDANT – AN INTRODUCTION
The student will gain knowledge of airlines policies and regulations, aviation technology, safety and emergency procedures, as well as in-flight service techniques.

WORLDWIDE GEOGRAPHY
Students will become familiar with worldwide tourist destinations. Knowledge of major tourist areas, transportation, cultures, local customs, climate and documentation are examined and supplemented through notes, maps, videos and geography textbook.

AIR TARIFFS & TICKETING
This segment of the course covers domestic, trans-border, and international air transportation. The focus of this course is on researching, understanding and quoting the lowest possible fare to meet the clients’ needs. This course focuses on basic fare calculations including special fares, trans-border and US fares, and an introduction to international fares.

TRAVEL FUNDAMENTALS
This section familiarizes the student with the Travel Industry as a whole including package and independent tours, coach tours, cruises, accommodations, ground transportation and travel insurance. Other aspects include rail travel in Canada, US and Europe, laws dealing with Travel & Tourism and a review of how the industry is structured.

SELF-DIRECTED STUDIES
This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire duration of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.

AUTOMATED RESERVATIONS
This aspect of the course enables the student to obtain a level of proficiency with the Sabre computer reservation system through hands-on training. This enables the graduate to become competent for entry-level positions performing computer reservation work. The skills covered include reservation procedures for airlines, car rentals, hotels, and tour wholesalers, retrieving general information and fares & ticketing.

FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT
This class focuses on the general elements applicable to today's restaurant, cafe, bar & lounge scene. Students are prepared to organize proper floor set and understand flow management, while maintaining and adhering to health and safety codes. Additionally students will learn about proper pricing techniques, in order to receive maximum revenue for their product.

OUT-OF-COUNTRY DESTINATION TRIP
The trip will give the student broader understanding of the travel experience. Qualifying students are provided the opportunity to participate in one out-of-country trip. Instructors will accompany the students to provide direction and insight.

PRACTICUM
The student that meets all the work term criteria will be placed in a work environment for a two-week period.

Course Descriptions

THE PROFESSION OF YOUTH CARE IN CANADA
This course provides an overview of the history, and present day practices of the profession in Canada. The profession will be examined from a theoretical perspective – psychoeducational, behavioral, systemic, disability, etc. – and from a practice perspective – residential, juvenile justice, school-based, community based, recreation, and parent education and support. Protocols, regulations, ethical considerations, teamwork concepts and human rights will also be discussed.

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS
This course will introduce students to the principals and practices of effective human relations. Students will have opportunity to integrate theory and skills development as they begin to recognize the process of human interaction. Giving and receiving feedback, assertiveness, and conflict resolution are among the special topics covered.

SELF CARE IN THE YOUTH CARE PROFESSION
Students will have the opportunity to explore and examine areas of personal stress and their maintaining variables in this course. Traditional and holistic methods of self-care will be examined in this applied course.

COMPUTERS FOR THE HUMAN SERVICES WORKPLACE
This course is designed to provide students with the level of computer literacy needed to function in today’s workplace. Utilizing a hands-on approach, general computer concepts, and the concepts of microcomputer operating systems, Internet, and word processing applications will be introduced. A personal email account will be introduced and used throughout the course to facilitate communication between students and instructors. Microsoft Office 2007 Suite: Word and PowerPoint will be covered.

EMPLOYMENT READINESS
The purpose of this course is to assist students to develop employment readiness skills. Among skills explored are: professional resume development, cover and thank you letters, interviewing skills, mock interview, and specific topics associated with professional behavior in the workplace

FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS IN INTERVIEWING
This course emphasizes the necessary skills to begin any helping relationship. Basic helping skills will be examined and practiced – active listening, reflecting, leading, challenging, paraphrasing, summarizing, etc. – through lectures, class discussions, and role play practice sessions.

CHILD ABUSE
This course takes an in-depth approach to educating students with regards to the different forms of abuse inflicted on children by adults. Emotional, physical, sexual abuse and neglect are defined and fully discussed, and symptoms and effects are identified. Special emphasis will be placed on describing the populations of children who are at-risk of abuse and why adults choose to be abusive to children. Interviewing skills for child victims of abuse will also be identified and practiced.

THE FAMILY – SYSTEMS, ISSUES, HELPING
This course will examine the family system; its communication patterns, rules, and life cycle. Students will have the opportunity to review historical and current practices through an extensive literature review and instructor led lectures. Students will also be introduced to the process of assessment, engagement, empowerment, and discharge as it relates to working with at-risk families.

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course will explore life span development (birth to death) with a primary focus on childhood and adolescence. Focus will be placed on developing an understanding of social, emotional, physical, cognitive, spiritual and psychological growth through exploring widely accepted theories.

BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT
This course will introduce students to a wide variety of applied behavioural techniques used to modify behaviours. Focus will be placed on methods to increase positive behaviour for success in any setting.

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE
The various psychopathologies related to the intellectual, social, emotional and physical sensory functioning of children and youth will be examined through the use of case studies and possible guest speakers. Psychopharmacological treatment will also be discussed.

YOUTH AND DEVIANCE IN CANADA
This course, facilitated through lectures, class discussions, field trips and guest speakers, will introduce the student to the concepts and theories associated with adolescence, delinquency and youth culture. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to history of delinquency, youth crime statistics, youth as victim, schools and delinquency, female deviance, and the Juvenile Justice Act.

GROUP DYNAMICS AND THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY PLANNING
This course provides opportunities for the student to utilize the skills and techniques of the group process in social and work situations. The focus is on group behavior in therapy settings and the use of various techniques, methods and approaches within the group process with children, adolescents, and families. Students will apply this theoretical knowledge to a wide array of therapeutic activity planning exercises.

COMMUNICATIONS II: REPORTING IN CHILD AND YOUTH CARE
This course will focus primarily on reports generated by Youth Care Workers. Students will have the opportunity to develop an Individualized Care Plan, Incident Reports, Weekly Reviews, Care Plan Updates, and Daily Logs through this case-study guided module.

CRISIS INTERVENTION
This course will provide students with theoretical knowledge and practical skills for managing crisis situations when in the field. Based on the premise that crisis is opportunity, students will learn intervention methods and safe practices through lectures and certifications. Certifications include, but are not limited to, Non Violent Crisis Intervention and Suicide Intervention.

INDEPENDENT DIRECTED SEMINAR
This course will assist students to develop their research and oral presentation skills in an area of mutual interest between the student and the instructor. It is intended that this seminar will be added to the student’s professional portfolio.

CHILD AND YOUTH CARE IN THE SCHOOL SETTING
This specialty course will assist students to further develop their skills for work in the educational setting. Topics discussed include professional practice, integration, special education planning, participating in the IEP process, and supporting children with exceptionalities. Up-to-date information will be provided by experts in the field when possible.

CHILD AND YOUTH CARE IN THE RESIDENTIAL SETTING
This specialty course will assist students in developing and honing their skills for work in the residential setting – group home, foster home, etc. Focus will be placed on guiding the student to develop competency based approaches that will be used to work with children, youth and their families who are experiencing out of home care situations. Up-to-date coverage will be provided by experts in each area.

YOUTH, DRUGS AND MENTAL HEALTH
This course will provide students with information regarding drug use and abuse in the youth population. Special emphasis will be placed on assisting students to develop an understanding of such topics as risk factors and protective factors for youth drug/use and abuse, models of assisting youth (stages of change model, harm reduction model, abstinence model, motivational interviewing, etc), the links between mental health issues and drug use/abuse, and the core functions of a substance abuse counselor.

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT I
The student who meets all designated requirements will be placed in a field placement for an eight-week period. The purpose of this applied course is to assist the student to integrate theory and practice through a supervised experience with a designated population.

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT II
The student who meets all designated requirements will be placed in a field placement for a twelve-week period. The purpose of this applied course is to assist the student to integrate theory and practice through a supervised experience with a designated population. When possible, this placement will be in a different location than CYC-400, Field Work I.

Course Descriptions

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
This course gives students an understanding of the early childhood education field. Aspects of children, families, play, environments, facilitator, partnerships, and quality will be examined in detail. Program variety, issues in the field, and child care regulations will also be discussed, giving students a general overview of what is required to work in this specialized field.

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS
This course will introduce students to the principles and practices of the human relationships. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and skill development as they begin to recognize the process of human interaction. Giving and receiving feedback, assertiveness, self-esteem, and conflict resolution are among the topics covered. Focus will be placed on self-exploration and experiential learning.

ART & CREATIVITY
During this course, students will explore their own creative and expressive abilities in order to relate, and develop opportunities for children to express theirs. A definition of creativity, various mediums and modes of expression, and the value of artistic display will be examined in detail.

INFANTS & TODDLERS
Working with infants and toddlers requires a specialized skill set, which will be introduced in this course of study. From birth to age two is a time of rapid development, and consistent care, observation, and responsiveness to their needs is required to ensure the foundation is set for all future learning. The many milestones that are reached during the first two years will be examined, and students will learn how to plan programming appropriate to support children in all areas of development.

HEALTH
Healthy practices are essential in the early childhood field, and during this course, students will learn what health-promotion is, how to do self-care while working in a demanding profession, and ways to prevent and manage illness. The many safety concerns involving young children will be discussed, including childhood injuries, prevention of abuse, and environmental dangers. Eating habits and food preparation will also be studied, giving students the opportunity to learn how to ensure proper nutrition for children of all ages.

PRESCHOOLERS
The preschool years are a time of extreme creativity. The value of supporting and encouraging play, strategies for enhancing children’s self-expression, and the ways to ensure an appropriate early childhood education experience for 2 to 5 year olds will be studied. Students will have the opportunity to plan programming, organize the environment, and design interest centers, which are essential skills in working with -preschool children.

CHILD GUIDANCE
This course allows students to gain an understanding of guiding young children to choose appropriate behaviours for themselves, while using natural consequences and reasonable expectations to lead them toward greater self-control. Prevention of unacceptable behaviour, reinforcement of prosocial behaviour, and methods of assisting children in attaining self-discipline will be examined. The impact of caregiving styles, direct, and indirect discipline strategies, and classroom management will give students an appreciation of the role they play in appropriate guidance of young children.

SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN
School-age children are at a unique period of development, struggling to gain independence, while maintaining the security of still being a child. Students will study the developmental issues that are unfolding, while learning to program plan, support, and care for the varying ages and stages inherent in this diverse group.

OBSERVATION & ASSESSMENT
Observation and assessment are critical skills when working with young children. Caregivers must practice systematic, objective observation of the children in their care to ensure programming and activities meet all individual needs. Students will gain an understanding of the importance of observation and assessment, what methods of observation can be used, and how to use the data obtained in order to accurately assess a child’s needs.

CHILDREN, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY
Children are a product of their family and community, and it is essential for caregivers to offer support to the child, as well as parents in their role of primary caregivers. Students will gain an understanding of the diverse family constellations, as well as the characteristics of dysfunctional families and the variables that can put children at risk. When forming a partnership, students will learn to respect the needs of families, and how best to communicate with and involve families. The community supports and resources available will also be examined.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT
Upon completion of this course, the student will have an overall view of the study of human development, learning about the transition from conception to birth, and the many milestones that cross the life span until adolescence. Physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development will be examined, giving students an understanding of the factors that influence each, and an appreciation of the importance of early foundational support.

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to offer children with special needs the best possible chance for holistic development in a normal living environment. In cooperation with parents and professionals, they will be able to develop, apply and evaluate integrated program plans that will stimulate the children to achieve their development potential and attain the objectives as part of the inclusion process.

BUSINESS OF A CHILD CARE CENTRE
This course is designed to make the student aware of the business and legal requirements for starting a childcare as a business. The students learn the legal steps in incorporating a company in New Brunswick and registering a business name. Students study the provincial regulations for childcare setup and operation. Sources of funding for business start-ups are presented to the students and each student prepares a business plan to support an application for a business loan.

ADMINISTRATION OF CHILD CARE CENTRE
Upon completion of this course, students will have a greater understanding of the administrative practices that are necessary for a successful childcare operation. The many roles and responsibilities of directors will be discussed, allowing students to better grasp the position and its function. The role of advocacy and professional practice will also be reviewed, giving students the knowledge necessary to lobby for change in a vital field.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Students gain competence in Microsoft Word and Microsoft Office software. They learn to use Word, Excel, Power Point, Access and Outlook. The students also learn to use e-mail to communicate productively. 

PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING
This course introduces the student to a wide variety of applied behavioural techniques used to modify behaviour. The course will assist the student in observing behaviour in an objective and analytical manner. Classical and operant conditioning theories and procedures will be emphasized in a practical manner. In addition, observational learning and cognitive-behavioural procedures will be explored. Effectiveness of treatment procedures and ethical issues will be discussed throughout the course.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT& ACCOUNTABILITY
This course will give students a background in professional conduct in early childhood and allow them to develop the skills necessary to be accountable in their chosen profession. They will have the opportunity to discuss industry standards, ethics, advocacy, and develop a professional portfolio, allowing them to enter the field prepared for the important role they will play.

NEW BRUNSWICK CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK FOR EARLY LEARNING AND CHILD CARE
Students will be trained in the curriculum that has been developed for use in all child care centres in New Brunswick. The four goals for early learning and care will be explored, and the implementation of programming to achieve these goals will be introduced. It is a child-focused approach that allows the teacher to provide the support and encouragement for the child’s attainment of their own knowledge in an environment that is diverse, flexible, and inclusive.

EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANTS FUNDAMENTALS
This course will give students the knowledge and skills for working within the school setting as an Educational Assistant. It will focus on the role of an EA, strategies for within the school environment, and an overview of possible expectations in this varied position.

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT
Students will have the opportunity to put their theoretical knowledge into practical use during their field placement. With appropriate supervision and guidance, they will manage the daily activities of an educator, EA, or other professional in this field, and will take on the duties and responsibilities that come with the position, giving them an accurate understanding and appreciation of their chosen career.

Course Descriptions

FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN SERVICES
Students will explore the foundation of generalist human service work practice. Through an interactive class students will discuss the profession’s historical roots, examine essential components of sound practice, and problem solving processes and review best practices. Students will explore interdisciplinary approaches and discuss ethical dilemmas.

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS
This course will introduce students to the principles and practices of the human relationship. Students will have opportunity to integrate theory and skills development as they begin to recognize the process of human interaction. Giving and receiving feedback, needs, assertiveness, self-esteem and conflict resolution are emphasized as important influences on interpersonal communication skills. Students will learn to develop collaborative and positive relationships. Focus will be placed on self-exploration and experiential learning.

LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT
This course will explore lifespan development (birth to death). Students will develop an understanding of social, emotional, physical, moral, and cognitive growth exploring widely accepted theories. Students will apply these theories to an observational learning experience.

SELF CARE
Students will have the opportunity to explore and examine areas of personal stress and their maintaining variables. Traditional and holistic methods of self-care will be examined in this applied course.

THE LEGAL SIDE OF HUMAN SERVICES
This course gives students a foundation of knowledge of the Canadian legal system necessary for them to properly advocate and support their future clients. Students will learn special considerations in human rights, consent and capacity, mental illness, and youth criminal justice. Students will also explore various provincial acts that apply to the field, observe court proceedings, and hear from several guest speakers.

FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS IN INTERVIEWING
This course emphasizes the necessary skills to begin any helping relationship. Basic helping skills will be examined and practiced – active listening, reflecting, leading, challenging, paraphrasing, summarizing, etc. – through lectures, class discussions and role play demonstrations.

COMMUNICATIONS
Through an interactive classroom environment the student will gain the basic skills and techniques necessary to communicate appropriately with staff, clients, families and other human services care providers. Focus will also be given to the importance of proper documentation and reporting. Students will learn basic computer software skills and will be participate in career planning sessions that focus on developing employability skills. Students will learn to prepare resumes and cover letters, they will be given interviewing strategies and will learn skills that will help them search and secure employment in their field. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, and journals, role playing and guest speakers.

THE FAMILY-SYSTEM, ISSUES, AND HELPING
This course will examine the family system; its communication patterns, rules, and life cycle. Students will have the opportunity to review historical and current practices through a literature review and instructor led lectures. Students will also be introduced to the process of assessment, engagement, empowerment and discharge as it relates to working with at-risk families. Students will gain skills for working with families, as well as facilitating skill development in families. Students will examine their own family system as well as gain the skills required to work effectively with traditional and non-traditional family structures.

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
Students will study the procedure and DSM-V criteria associated with being diagnosed with mental health illnesses. Areas to be explored include, but are not limited to, Bipolar Disorder, Mood Disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Anxiety Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Schizophrenia. Students will learn the symptoms and behaviours associated with the above mental illnesses, through case studies, videos, and a variety of instructor led demonstrations. Students will explore and research prevention and treatments including psychotherapy, group therapy, psychoeducational therapy, and psychopharmacological treatments.

BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT
This course introduces the student to a wide variety of applied behavioral techniques used to modify behavior. The course will assist the student in observing behavior in an objective and analytical manner. Classical and operant conditioning theories and procedures will be emphasized in a practical manner and implemented through case studies.

GROUP DYNAMICS AND THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY PLANNING
This course provides opportunities for the student to utilize the skills and techniques of the group process in social and work situations. The focus is on group behavior in therapeutic settings and the use of various techniques, methods and approaches within the group process with children, youth and their families. Students will apply this theoretical knowledge to a group therapeutic activity planning project.

ABUSE
This course will educate students on the different forms of abuse inflicted against children, adults, elders and vulnerable persons. Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of many types of abuse, such as: neglect and psychological, physical, sexual, and economic abuse. Students will learn how to identify signs of abuse and what to do if they suspect abuse. Risk factors and prevention will also be covered in respect to victims and perpetrators.

RESIDENTIAL
This course is designed to increase students’ knowledge and skills in the area of residential placements of adults, seniors and vulnerable persons. It will focus on competency based program design and implementation as best practice qualities are explored and discussed. Topics will include, but are not limited to, the role of collaborative problem solving, structure, consistency, individualized programming, staff team work, and quality care. Students will apply the concepts learned in class to a variety of case study examples.

CRISIS INTERVENTION I and II
These courses will provide students with theoretical knowledge and practical skills for managing crisis situations. Based on the premise that “Crisis is Opportunity”, Crisis Intervention I teaches students introductory intervention methods and safe practices through activities, self reflection, and script writing. Certifications include Nonviolent Crisis Intervention and Suicide Intervention. In Crisis Intervention II, Students develop a deeper understanding of crisis intervention and focus primarily on learning more advanced techniques required to implement the stages of Life Space Crisis Intervention.

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT
This hands-on course uses theoretical knowledge developed in earlier courses to develop and facilitate both recreational and therapeutic program planning based on individuals’ goals. Students also learn how to develop a thorough task analysis in order to assist clients in reaching their goals. Students will learn all aspects of program planning and develop superior skills in group and individual facilitation.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT
This course will provide students with information regarding substance use and abuse. Special emphasis will be placed on assisting students to develop an understanding of such topics as risk factors and protective factors for drug use/abuse, models of assisting (stages of change model, harm reduction model, abstinence model, motivational interviewing, etc.), the links between mental health issues and drug use/abuse and the core functions of a substance abuse counselor.

HUMAN SERVICES IN THE COMMUNITY
This course develops a strong understanding of exceptionalities and disabilities and ways in which students can support their clients in integrating positively into the community by adopting the philosophies of Social Role Valorization. Students will also gain practical experience identifying appropriate support services and intervention strategies available within the community through guest speakers, community visits, volunteer experiences and research. Students also develop an understanding of the relationships between families, community agencies and support service professionals by learning about current Canadian policies and programs.

MENTAL HEALTH
Students will study issues relating to individuals diagnosed with mild to chronic and short and long term mental health illnesses and the challenges and barriers associated with the illness. Areas to be explored include but are not limited to ADD/ADHD, Anxiety Disorder, Downs Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Schizophrenia. Students will explore treatments which include medications, natural alternatives, behaviour modification and other related interventions.

INDEPENDENT DIRECTED SEMINAR
Students will participate in an individual project which is designed for the purpose of an in-depth study of a preapproved topic within the field. Students will be provided a framework for the work required with specific deliverables due throughout the course. Students will be required to submit a written report and as well, will be required to create a workshop related to the field of study. Instructors will support students by providing an appropriate audience for the presentations.

CAREER READINESS
Students will learn basic computer software skills and will participate in career planning sessions that focus on developing employability skills. Students will learn to prepare resumes and cover letters, they will be given interviewing strategies and will learn skills that will help them search and secure employment in their field. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, journals, role playing and guest speakers.

PRACTICUM I
Students will be placed in an on the job training site for the purposes of observation. The students will be assigned placements and will observe specific aspects of the program. Daily record keeping will be a requirement where students will be writing responsive journals. They will be required to record details of the observation and will then be required to either evaluate in terms of effectiveness of actions carried out, to classify actions or behaviours, to develop a plan to support, or to reflect on the situation.

PRACTICUM II
Students who meet all of the designated requirements will be placed in a second on the job training site for 12 weeks where they will participate fully in the operations of the host. Successful completion of the practicum is a requirement of graduation.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS

Students will practice and develop verbal skills to effectively control difficult people and situations while learning to respond rather than react to a situation. The course teaches students accurate note taking skills while reinforcing the importance of notes for court purposes. Students will discuss such topics as communications, process and effective communication as it relates to verbal and non-verbal communication. Students will also explore the impact of stereotyping, prejudice and culture on communication.

BOOT CAMP

This is a physical aspect of the program that is held for the first four weeks of the program. Students are involved in a series of physical activities that are designed to build individual levels of fitness and endurance. As well the cadet will learn the core values necessary to succeed in law enforcement: uniform and department, regulation and obligations, and inspection and drill.

PHYSICAL ABILITIES REQUIREMENT EVALUATION (P.A.R.E.)

Students are required to pass the P.A.R.E. test of fitness in order to receive their diploma.

FITNESS AND LIFESTYLE

This course is a combination of classroom and practical work. Students will learn to manage their personal lifestyle through explaining aspects of health and wellness. They will be introduced to Canada’s Food Guide and making good food choices, goal setting and time management, self-esteem, attitude and intentions and their role in participation in physical activity. As well, students will participate in an active physical program as they acquire the physical competencies needed to meet the requirements of the profession.

DEFENSE TACTICS AND OFFICE SAFETY

The students will learn defensive tactics, control techniques, tackle downs and come along holds used by Police and Corrections officers. Pressure point systems and different methods of restraints will be introduced. Topics covered include: officer safety, handcuffing techniques, searching techniques, martial arts training techniques, incident management intervention models, compliance tools and collapsible baton training.

POLICING OPERATIONS

Students will be introduced to police/security duties and responsibilities and will participate in scenarios where they apply learned techniques.Students will learn crime scene protection skills, evidence gathering and note taking.

COMMUNITY POLICING

Students will be introduced to the philosophy of Community Policing and the value of creating partnerships in the community as important aspects in the policing sector. Students will be exposed to the culture and make-up of the local community area while becoming an integral member of the police community relationship/partnership process. Oulton cadets volunteer at chosen community events for a total of 20 hours during the year.

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS

During this course students will be introduced to investigative procedures. They will learn the methodology and techniques of observation as they are introduced to crime scene investigation, first officer on the scene, crime scene management, fingerprinting, interview, interrogation, investigations, and law scenarios.

LAW

The student is introduced to the Criminal Justice System in Canada. The course examines major theories related to the study of crime and various consequences received by offenders. Topics covered include but are not limited to the Criminal Code, Federal Statues, Provincial Statutes, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom, Youth Criminal Justice Act, Canadian Evidence Act, Use of Force Law, Powers of Arrest, Search and Seizure, Warrants, Driving Offenses, Sexual Offenses, Corrections and Conditional Release Act.

ETHICS

Students shall practice ethical decision making during this course. They will gain knowledge and insight to several “code of conducts” and the expectations of their actions in the field. They will explore the importance of ethics and distinguish ethics from law and religion. Students will define various types of responses to ethical situations. Emphasis will be placed on requirements concerning confidentiality in police, corrections and security work. Students will explore aspects of professionalism and its value in the profession.

CORRECTIONAL OPERATIONS

Students will be introduced to the knowledge and skills to maintain security in an institutional setting. The student will acquire knowledge in: key control, inmate movement, internal and external escort, searching, and seizure on contraband, counts, radio procedure, report writing, perimeter security, and situational management model. The student will also learn: problem solving, the CAPRA model of decision making, crisis intervention, effective listening skills, observation techniques, management of emergency situations, hostage taking and forcible confinement, defusing crisis situation, suicide awareness workshop, self-injurious behaviour and report writing. 

CANADIAN CORRECTIONS

This course will provide the student an overview of Corrections in Canada by examining various Correctional systems, both federal and provincial. Students will explore corrections and criminal justice systems and community correction. They will cover types of institutions, roles and responsibilities clarification and risk assessment of offenders.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

Students gain competence in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office software. They lear to use Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access and Outlook. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively.

PSYCHOLOGY OF POLICING AND CORRECTIONS

This course will provide the student insight into the study of crime and criminal behaviour while focusing on the various crimes. The course highlights factors that contribute to law enforcement as well as psychological factors that officers face on a daily basis. Students will identify and discuss a variety of psychological disorders and factors that may cause violence and aggression. They will learn effective interviewing techniques and recognize crime partners.

SOCIOLOGY

This course explores the ever changing laws that govern Canada while focusing on bas knowledge and skills for entry in policing, corrections and general security. The emphasis in this program is in the law, its application and techniques. Students will recognize potential problem areas and the means to control situations. It also prepares students to face the criminal aspect of the social deviances in our community and inside institutions.

PRACTICUM

Students will participate in a mandatory Practicum in order to gain first-hand experience and to practice skills and techniques learned.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS AND ETHICS

This module will provide the students with knowledge of ethics and law in dentistry and the dental assisting profession. The class will consist of instruction and practical role playing experiences that will allow the student to implement their communication skills in the dental office and with the public.

COMMUNICATIONS AND DENTAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

Students will gain an understanding of the roles of a receptionist and how to communicate effectively. Understanding the psychology of a patient, the proper maintenance of a patient file, accounts payable/receivable, payroll and insurance form procedures and processing will be taught. Basic banking procedures commonly used will also be covered.

MICROBIOLOGY

Oral microbiology will focus on the study of microorganisms existing in the oral cavity. Knowledge of microbiology and the role of infectious diseases in the dental office will be covered.

INTRO TO CLINIC

The students will complete the theory required to be able to confidently practice in a clinical setting. Sterilization, disinfection and orientation to the office and clinical set up will be taught and reinforced through clinical experience.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will include an orientation to the structures of the human body and the functions within them. Topics covered: parts of the cell to the major body systems and how they work together.

DENTAL SCIENCES

This course will educate the students in dental sciences including embryology, landmarks of the oral cavity and components of the dentition. Applying the information to a clinic setting by demonstrating the ability to complete a patient record will be achieved.

DENTAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will educate the students in dental health, allowing them to recognize, explain, and demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques to their patients. The skills required to perform preventative dental assisting tasks will be demonstrated in a clinic setting as students practice on a typodont, each other and graduate to patient care. This course also covers basic nutrition theory that will allow the student to be able to discuss the relationship between diet and good dental health with their patients. Community dental health projects will be prepared and delivered throughout the year.

PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

A dental assistant student will gain the understanding of objectives related to the classification of drugs, how they affect dental procedures and how to use drug reference material, including understanding prescriptions. The knowledge and understanding of medical emergencies and how to assist during one of these emergencies is key to a dental practice.

RADIOLOGY

Basic principles of physics and radiography will be covered, ensuring that the student understands the importance of radiology and the safety precautions required to operate a dental X-ray unit. Techniques will be taught in class and practical experience will be gained later in the program.

RESTORATIVE

Chair side intra-oral procedures and processes will be detailed in a classroom setting, demonstrated evaluated in the clinic. The student will learn to recognize and understand the procedures, instruments and materials used to complete common restorative appointments.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY/ORAL PATHOLOGY

This course will provide the student with a detailed description of the head and neck region including theory as it relates to the bones, muscles, nerves, and blood supply. This course will also present the student with material on diseases of the oral cavity and diagnostic information that a dentist would use to determine pathologies. The course consists of classroom material enhanced with a series of instructor handouts and visual materials.

DENTAL SPECIALTIES

This module is comprised of a series of seminars derived from dental specialties. Information will be delivered as it relates to the practice of a dental assistant in any specialty office. The course is supported by a series of guest speakers and office rotations.

DENTAL RECORDS

Tooth morphology and proper charting will be covered during this module. A clinical chart will be discussed in depth including details on obtaining information and being able to complete a chart in detail. Students will learn how to complete a chart and to understand the importance of being able to communicate the information to the patient.

LABORATORY PROCEDURES

Taking place in a lab setting, combined with classroom instruction, students will learn the methods of lab procedures such as taking impressions, pouring and trimming models and preparing custom trays.

PATIENT CARE CLINIC

This module will provide the student with the opportunity to learn hands on and be evaluated on all aspects of clinical dental assisting. The complete process of client care will be brought together in a “real” clinic setting as the student schedules patients to be treated in a supervised patient clinic.

RADIOLOGY LAB

The student will practice radiology techniques on a typodont, including safety, exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs.

PRACTICUM

Five weeks of supervised practical clinical experience will be achieved. Student’s time will be spent in a general dentistry practice and have hands-on practice.

Course Descriptions

PRECLINICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of dental hygiene care. Fundamentals of safe dental hygiene practice and instrumentation skills are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students’ development of the skills defined within the dental hygiene scope of practice. Skills are practiced first on manikins and later on classmates in treatment simulation sessions.

ORAL ANATOMY AND ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES
This theory course covers the recognition of the basic structures and tissues of the oral cavity in health. Emphasis is placed on procedures required to do oral assessments of clients and record findings using accepted clinical symbols according to professional practice standards.

DENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION I AND II
This theory course teaches communication techniques to facilitate management of clients in the clinical setting and to foster clients’ learning of self care practices related to general and oral health. The role of nutrition in maintenance of optimal health is discussed. As students progress to the next levels of health promotion they will discusses the physical, intellectual, and socio-economic factors which influence clients’ decisions and actions in maintaining their oral health and accessing oral health care. Emphasis is placed on individualizing oral self care messages for clients across the lifespan. Nutrition and how it relates to total client care is the focus in HYG-204.

RADIOGRAPHY I AND II
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the history, development and use of radiation in the diagnosis of dental disease. The principles of proper exposure, processing, handling and storage of dental diagnostic radiographs are covered. Radiation hygiene required to protect client and operator from hazardous exposure levels is emphasized. The laboratory portion of the course allows students to refine exposure techniques for standard intraoral views using manikins. Bisecting angle, paralleling and occlusal plane techniques are studied. Clinical simulations with classmates and exposures for clients are also part of the laboratory requirements.

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology pertinent to the dental hygienists’ role in overall health assessment of clients prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and on-going oral care.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology of the head and neck pertinent to the dental hygienists roll in the overall health assessment prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and ongoing oral care.

CLINICAL PRACTICE
During this series of clinical courses students will provide education and clinical treatment interventions to clients who require simple to complex protocols for maintenance of oral health.

THEORY OF DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE
This theory course supports clinical practice by discussing the elements of the dental hygiene process of care and how to apply it in the assessment, planning and delivery of oral care services to clients. Portions of class time are used to discuss issues related to clinical procedures, progress and performance expectations as students gain greater expertise in clinical skills.

HEALTH STATUS ASSESSMENT
This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and discusses the basic drug groups and their uses. The relationship of drug therapies for systemic illness to the implications for planning and delivery of oral care for clients is emphasized.

ORAL HISTOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY
This theory course introduces students to the study of oral tissues in health and disease at the cellular level. Emphasis is on the process of disease and the body’s natural defense mechanisms to counter damage.

PERIODONTICS
This course examines, in detail, the structures and tissues of the periodontium in health and progressing to states of disease. The factors that initiate and sustain periodontal disease are studied and interventions designed to maintain periodontal health are emphasized. The role of the dental hygienist as a primary health care provider in implementing evidence-based therapies to halt the disease process and assist in regaining and maintaining periodontal health is emphasized. During this course students will explore advanced techniques for treatment of periodontal disease and surgical correction of defects resulting from disease. Emphasis is placed on the collaborative role of the dental hygienist.

DENTAL MATERIALS AND LABORATORY PROCEDURES
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the characteristics of dental materials. The properties, proper manipulation and storage of common materials used in dentistry are studied. The laboratory sessions allow students to manipulate materials and create products related to dental diagnosis and treatment.

COMMUNICATION
This course emphasizes the importance of imparting or recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. The principles of doing academic research to prepare an oral report or to write a paper are studied and implemented. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letters, analytical reports etc.). The student will develop the skill to access relevant and credible resources in order to research a topic of interest to the field of dental hygiene.

DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE STANDARDS
This course introduces students to the ethical and legal responsibilities of dental hygiene practice. Discussion centers around the use of pertinent New Brunswick provincial health regulation legislation, Professional Practice Standards and the Dental Hygiene Code of Ethics as quality control mechanisms to protect the public from receiving substandard care are covered. Remedies available to clients harmed by practitioners are studied. The principles and procedures of employment search will be addressed. Students will learn how to write an effective resume. Strategies for making follow-up contacts with prospective employers and preparing for a job interview will be emphasized.

CLINIC FEEDBACK
During this weekly session students are encouraged to bring topics for discussion from activities and situations which arise during clinical practice. This course provides a regular forum for transfer of pertinent information among students and faculty regarding clinical practice.

COMMUNITY HEALTH
This course introduces the concept of health as applied to groups or populations. The application of the dental hygiene process of care to assess group needs and plan appropriate educational/treatment strategies is discussed. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of statistics as used to assess needs in groups or populations and their use in program planning.

SOCIAL SCIENCE
This course explores human psychological and social development over the life span. Emphasis is placed on the influence of perception, knowledge, needs and motivation on behavior. Students study the mechanisms of behavior in the dental environment and how client behavior can be modified towards habits that foster improved oral health.

ORAL PATHOLOGY
This course concentrates on the oral manifestations of systemic disease and the implications for dental hygiene interventions. Specialized radiographic and laboratory techniques used in diagnosis of oral diseases are discussed. Recognition of the indications of common diseases from diagnostic images is stressed.

PERIODONTICS II
This course is a continuation of Periodontics I (HYG 207). Students learn detailed characteristics of the structures and tissues of the periodontium as periodontal disease continues to create more advanced tissue destruction. Examination of surgical and non surgical phases of periodontal therapy and post operative periodontal health maintenance are emphasized. Treatment modalities are investigated using systematic reviews and position papers from the American Academy of Periodontology. The implications and dental hygiene care of dental implants are examined.

CLINICAL SEMINARS
The implications of medically compromised patients will be examined in relationship to oral manifestations, prevention of problems, and treatment modifications. Discussion of client case studies will expand the students’ understanding of the dental hygiene process of care and provide students with comprehensive information on the clinical management of clients, especially those with special needs, in the planning and delivery of oral care.

BIOSTATISTICS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY
Students learn basic biostatistics and how they are used to make decisions regarding delivery of publicly funded dental services to the community. The use of experimental and non-experimental research designs and statistical analyses in determining community needs, designing programs and evaluating the success of intervention strategies is addressed. Students also learn to read, understand and assess the quality of published research and the importance of this in life-long learning as a practicing professional.

COMMUNICATIONS II
Students learn how communication with peers and health care professionals differs from that with other groups. This course concentrates on completion of secondary research techniques: written and oral presentation of findings designed for peer/professional audiences.

COMMUNITY HEALTH PLACEMENTS
Field placement activities are designed to familiarize students with the realities of dental hygiene practice in specialty settings. Students will prepare for and complete assignments in designated specialties.

ORTHODONTICS THEORY AND LABORATORY
The theory portion of this course discusses the principles of assessment data collection for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Commonly used appliance systems are examined and basics of orthodontic biomechanics and tissue responses to tooth movement are studied. During the laboratory component students practice orthodontic skills on manikins and partners (limited) in simulated clinical exercises.

Course Descriptions

PRECLINICAL THEORY and PRACTICE for LONG TERM CARE and COMMUNITY PRACTICE
This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of care. Fundamentals of safe practice and instrumentation skills for long term care and community practise are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students ‘development of the skills defined within the scope of practice. Skills are practiced first on manikins and later on classmates in treatment simulation sessions. Topics such as WHMISS and infection control are addressed.

COMMUNICATIONS I
This course emphasizes the importance of imparting or recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letter and reports). Ethics and the roles of regulatory bodies in health care will be explored.

HEALTH PROMOTION I : HEALTHY LIVING and NUTRITION
This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living and the communication techniques to facilitate management of clients in the clinical setting and foster a clients learning of self-care practices related to total patient health. Students progress with their knowledge of health as they discuss the physical, intellectual, and socio-economic factors which influence clients’ decisions and actions in maintaining their health and accessing health care. Emphasis is placed on individualizing self care messages for clients across the lifespan. A component of this course will cover food handling and preparation.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This theory course discusses human anatomy and physiology, connections between body systems and the terminology to support it.

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
This theory discusses the principles of growth and development across the life cycle. Students will gain an understanding that a client needs change as the client progresses through this life cycle.

CLINICAL PRACTICE-LONG TERM CARE
Students will apply personal care skills in a long term care setting. (2 week placement)

CLINICAL PRACTICE-COMMUNITY
Students will apply skills learned in the lab setting, in the community. (1 week placement)

PRECLINICAL PRACTICE AND THEORY FOR ACUTE CARE
This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of care. Fundamentals of safe practice and instrumentation skills for acute care practice are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students development of the skills defined within the scope of practice. Such topics as hospital protocols, isolation techniques and sterilization processing will be discussed.

PALLIATIVE CARE
Students will explore the concepts of palliation within the support workers scope of practice, examining topics such as client and family needs, spirituality, culture, loss, grief and caregiver support. Included in this course is Palliative Care for Front Line Workers certificate offered through Cancer Care NS.

COMMUNICATIONS ll
A continuation of HCSW 103, this course will prepare students with more advanced communications skills including multicultural considerations; ethics, stress management and practical knowledge for inter professional communication.

THEORY OF HEALTH CARE SUPPORT IN MENTAL HEALTH
Students will gain an understanding of the role of health care support teams to specific to the needs of patients and residents experiencing mental health illness. Diseases and disorders in mental health, including those found in aging population will be explored. Included will be Non-violent Crisis Intervention and Alzheimer’s disease and Other Dementia’s Care Course.

DISEASE AND DISORDERS
This course will introduce human diseases and the fundamentals of homeostatic mechanisms. Mechanisms of disease how alterations affect healthy structure and function will be illustrated through exploring common disease states. Disease and illness will be discussed.

DISABILITIES ACROSS LIFE SPAN
This course will introduce developmental and intellectual disabilities across the human life span. Health Care Support Worker’s roles and responsibilities will be discussed; Adaptive clothing, adaptive devices and special needs will be explored.

MEDICATION AWARENESS
Students will be introduced to their role in medication awareness across the continuum, of care. Common medication terminology, labels, Over-the-Counter and prescription medications will be discussed.

COMMUNITY PLACEMENTS
This is the second of the community placements where students will apply all skills pertaining to home management.

ACUTE CARE PLACEMENTS
Field placements activities are designed to familiarize students will the realities of the acute care setting. Students will be placed in acute areas of practice for 40 hours during the semester.

PRACTICUM
Students will be placed in off-site setting for 4 weeks as they become integrated in a real life setting and practice the summative nature of the day to day work of a support worker. Students may choose any field of study for the placement (long term, acute).

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.
 

Course Descriptions

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This course introduces the sciences of anatomy and physiology and the basic structure, functions and assessment of the human body in its state of wellness. Integration of systems and maintenance of homeostasis within the body will also be discussed.

COMMUNICATIONS AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS
Through an interactive classroom environment the student will gain the basic skills and techniques necessary to communicate appropriately with staff, clients, families and other health care providers. Focus will also be given to the importance of proper documentation and reporting. Also, attention to nursing theories that pertain to communication and basic needs all humans require will be examined. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, and journals, role playing and guest speakers.

PRE-CLINCAL THEORY
Through an interactive classroom setting students will gain knowledge of theory related to the Canadian Health Care System and the foundation of nursing to appropriately deliver care. Students will know and practice the principles behind the skills that will be delivered at the bedside. As well, students will be able to use and understand the terminology used in nursing.

BEGINNING NURSING SKILLS LAB
Upon completion of this course the student will be able to perform basic nursing skills that are commonly required in the care of patients. These skills are required in acute, long term and community settings. In addition to classroom theory, the student will have an opportunity to practice and perform skills in the simulation lab. The student must be successful in both the theory and all lab components of this course.

NUTRITION AND HEALTHY LIVING
This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living and the communication techniques needed to facilitate management of patients in the clinical setting. It also fosters patients’ learning of self care practices and how these relate to total patient health. Students will also be able to identify and explain the relationship between nutrition and diabetes and describe the effects of this disease due to poor nutrition.

ADULT PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT I
This course will provide the student with the opportunity to develop health assessment skills and techniques required to properly obtain a full health assessment of a client. It includes an introduction to a health assessment, components of health interview and guidelines to performing a head-to-toe physical examination. It also encompasses a review of anatomy as it pertains to the physical examination. Emphasis will be placed on procedures required to do assessments of clients and record finding using accepted clinical symbols according to professional practice standards.

CLINICAL PRACTICE
During this series of clinical courses, students will provide care, education and interventions in practice. Clinics may be held on site or in a variety of agency/clinical settings. Clinics will be sequenced appropriately based on theory material covered. Clinical practice will be experienced in settings including, but not limited to: medical/surgical, maternal, geriatrics, pediatrics, mental health as well as a variety of community settings. *Although some clinic/lab sessions will be on site, students will be responsible for travel an costs associated with relocation, travel and other to access assigned clinical sites. Clinical rotations are scheduled throughout the program.

DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY
This course will introduce human diseases and the fundamentals of homeostatic mechanisms. Mechanisms of disease and how alterations to body systems affect healthy structure and function will be illustrated through exploring common disease states.

COMMUNICATING THROUGH CHARTNG AND DOCUMENTATION
This course emphasizes the importance of imparting and recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. The principles of doing academic research to prepare an oral report or to write a paper are studied and implemented. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letter and reports). The student will develop the skill to access relevant and creditable resources in order to research topics of interest to LPN’s.

ADVANCED PRE-CLINICAL THEORY
This course will be a continuation from semester one focusing on those skills that are more in depth and require a greater skill and knowledge level. Students will learn and practice the principles behind the skills that will be delivered at the bedside.

INTERMEDIATE NURSING SKILLS LAB
The lab experience will continue to be a time for students to integrate their knowledge and skills in providing simulated nursing care to fellow students and simulation equipment. The level of care the student will be able to provide will be of a higher level and their critical thinking will be tested with each scenario given.

SPECIALTY PRACTICE BASED HEALTH CARE I
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the process of care that is brought to the bedside while caring for those clients who are either brand new to life, suffering with life threatening illness or perhaps in the last stages of the dying process.

ADULT PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT II
A continuation of LPN 106, this course will prepare the student with more advanced interview skills as well as introduce assessment of the more involved client. Such things as history taking and interviewing for motor skills and physical and social abilities will be explored.

INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY
This course introduces the principles of Pharmacology and the basic drug groups and uses. Proper terminology and the familiarization of their uses in planning and delivery of care will be discussed.

SAFETY AT WORK

  • Non-Violent Crisis Intervention 
  • WHIMIS
  • CPR
  • First Aid

PHELBOTOMY
The course will provide the LPN student with a theoretical and working knowledge of specimen collection techniques. The topics covered in this course include: anatomy of the human blood circulation system, safety in phlebotomy, phlebotomy equipment, phlebotomy procedures, specimen consideration and special procedures.

SPECIALITY PRACTICE BASED HEALTH CARE II
This course will build upon assessment techniques learned as they apply to varied populations and settings. Students will learn the specific knowledge required to practise in aging populations, surgery and oncology. Differences in practise within the spectrum of settings for care will be explored.

LEADERSHIP/PROFESSIONALISM
During this course the student will learn the importance of a professional reputation and the importance of establishing this in their workplace every day. They will recognize how professionals view their work, how they think, act and treat others. Practical Nurses are currently in these roles having earned the respect and reputation.

COMMUNITY HEALTH
Concepts of health as applied to groups and populations are explored and applied using the nursing model of care as students develop community health knowledge and apply it is a series of community programming formats. Field placement activities are designed to familiarize students with the realities of practice in specialty settings. Students will prepare for and complete assignments in designated specialties.

PRACTICE STANDARDS FOR HEALTH CARE IN CANADA
This course introduces the ethical and legal responsibilities of nursing practise. Discussion centers on provincial and national regulations. Students will learn the code of ethics, quality controls and protection of the public.

MEDICATION/IV INITIATION
This course teaches in a simulated setting the basic concepts of pharmacological theory and the skills necessary to safely administer medications through oral, rectal and injectable sites. Also, the student will learn the proper administration techniques of IV initiation and its responsibilities and legal implications.

MENTAL HEALTH
This course explores human psychological and social development over the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on the influence of perception, knowledge, environment, needs and motivation of behaviour. The primary focus on the course is placed on applying this knowledge to understanding and working with individuals in mentally compromised states.

CLINIC FEEDBACK
During weekly sessions students will bring topics for discussion to class from clinical/ community activities to share learning with classmates and faculty. This will also be a forum for discussing pertinent issues related to patient care, process and placements that are important to address with faculty. Portions of this class will be used to discuss issues related to procedures, practice, progression and performance expectations as students gain more knowledge.

NURSING PROCESS OF CARE
This course will focus on the process of care that the students will initiate in order to bring patients back to optimal wellness. They will learn to prepare, carry out and assess whether the plan best meets the patients holistic needs.

APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS
Students learn how communication with peers and health care professionals differs from that with other groups. This course concentrates on completion of secondary research techniques: written and oral presentation of findings designed for peer/professional audiences. Basic biostatics will be taught in order for students to undertake a simple research design and analysis of a health intervention. The principles and procedures of employment search will be addressed. Students will learn how to write an effective resumé. Emphasis will be placed on strategies for making follow-up contacts with prospective employers and job interview preparation skills.

PRACTICUM
Students will be placed in offsite settings for 4 weeks as they become integrated in a real life setting and practise the summative nature of the day to day work of a practical nurse. Students may be required to gain membership to the association in order to perform all duties required for completion of the program.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.
 

Course Descriptions

INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE
This module serves as a basic introduction to the field of Medical Laboratory Science. Topics covered include the following:

  • Laboratory disciplines
  • Quality Assessment
  • Professionalism
  • Client/Patient Services
  • Communication
  • Employment Strategies

 

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I / TERMINOLOGY
The student will be introduced to the different body systems, the structure and function of the major organs within each system and the pathophysiology of common diseases and conditions associated with each. The student will become familiar with clinical procedures, laboratory tests and abbreviations related to each system and other specialized areas of medicine.

SOFTWARE
Emphasis in this area is placed on giving the student knowledge in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office software, which is becoming the software of choice for most of today’s offices. Using Microsoft’s latest office software Office 2007, the student becomes familiar with Word and Excel. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively and the Internet as an effective research tool.

LABORATORY MATHEMATICS
Students will learn the basic mathematics used in a medical laboratory environment including:

  • Mathematical essentials
  • Measurement systems and conversion procedures
  • Dilutions, solutions, and concentrations
  • Charts, tables, and graphs
  • Introductory statistics

BASIC LABORATORY PROCEDURES
This module will provide the medical laboratory assistant student with the knowledge of labware, basic laboratory instrumentation, reagent preparation and basic procedures in hematology and urinalysis, including the clinical practice.

INFECTIOUS CONTROL AND SAFETY
The student will review and develop a working knowledge of:

  • Standard precautions
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Utilization of safety devices
  • WHMIS
  • Spill containment and clean up procedures
  • Incident reporting
  • Occupational health and safety guidelines
  • Infection Control
  • Appropriate methods for disinfection and sterilization

KEYBOARDING
Keyboarding is a foundation skill required for effective computer usage. By use of a valuable all-in-one keyboarding program, the student will develop proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is placed on speed and accuracy.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
The student will continue to learn about the different body systems, the structure and function of the major organs within each system and the pathophysiology of common diseases and conditions associated with each. The student will become familiar with clinical procedures, laboratory tests and abbreviations related to each system and other specialized areas of medicine.

SPECIMEN PROCUREMENT
This course focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of specimen collection techniques. The topics covered in this module include:

  • Anatomy of the human blood circulation system
  • Preparation for specimen collection
  • Patient interaction
  • Specimen procurement procedures for venipuncture, capillary specimens and urine collections
  • Specimen identification
  • Specimen delivery

SPECIMEN PROCESSING
The student will develop a working knowledge of various pre and post analytical processes such as:

  • Specimen reception
  • Verification of specimen integrity
  • Pre analytic processes
  • Specimen dispatching
  • Specimen storage
  • Basic office procedures including telephone techniques, faxing, filing and time management

BASIC LABORATORY PROCEDURES II
This module, continued from MLA 105, will provide the medical laboratory assistant student with the knowledge and clinical practice of basic clinical chemistry and immunohematology.

INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY
The module introduces the student to basic microbiology and clinical procedures. The course includes the theoretical and practical aspects of:

  • Clinical procedures used for microbiological specimens
  • Culture media
  • Inoculation
  • Incubation
  • Microbiology staining procedures

INTRODUCTION TO HISTOLOGY AND CYTOLOGY
The student will acquire basic knowledge pertaining to histology and cytology techniques such as:

  • Specimen reception
  • Specimen fixation, grossing, decalcification, processing and embedding
  • Microtomy
  • Staining and coverslipping
  • Preparation of gynecologic and non-gynecologic cytology specimens

SELF DIRECTED STUDIES
This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. Time will be assigned during the schedule each week. The student does not receive a mark for this module.

PRACTICUM
The student who meets all the work term criteria (has successfully passed all course material) will be placed in a health care facility for a 6-week practicum session. Specific objectives in all aspects of program and national competencies must be met in order to complete this module. Successful completion is mandatory for graduation from the program.
 

Course Descriptions

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
Spelling, pronunciation and meanings of medical terminology are taught in this course. The identification of a medical word through structural analysis (prefixes, root words, and suffixes) also is taught. This course includes an overview of anatomy and physiology, which is learned while studying each body system. Simple, non-technical explanation of medical terms is incorporated with descriptions of anatomy, physiology, and pathology (no previous knowledge of biology is presumed or needed). The student becomes familiar with clinical procedures, laboratory tests, and abbreviations related to each body system and other specialized areas of medicine.

HOSPITAL PROCEDURES, PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDITECH
This course will introduce the student to the role of the Medical Administrator/Ward Clerk working in a hospital setting. Basic concepts of pharmacology will be taught and common classification of medications and their therapeutic usages. They will learn how to use drug reference material. The student will be introduced to the patient chart, patient Kardex, basic Meditech system principles, and forms associated with different hospital tests and procedures.

INTRODUCTION TO SIMPLY ACCOUNTING
This course provides students with minimal experience in the field of bookkeeping or accounting the ability to learn the skills and terminology necessary to work with computerized accounting in a small business. Through a progressive set of lectures and challenge exercises in each chapter, students gain the knowledge and get the practice to complete basic computerized accounting work.

MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES
Students are introduced to proper techniques to ensure patient/client confidentiality; efficiently schedule patient/client appointments; medical ethics; screen, triage, manage incoming and outgoing calls; records management such as creating, maintaining, and proper disposal of medical charts; discuss the importance of security, privacy, and confidentiality of health records and explain how to preserve them; understanding different components of the medical charts; and other administrative office procedures. Students will also learn how to use the Physician’s Manual and simulated billing and order entry software. Also covered are details of the Workplace Health Safety and Compensation Commission of New Brunswick billing system, and private billing procedures.

MEDICAL KEYBOARDING
This aspect of the course places emphasis on proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is also placed on speed and accuracy by the development of skills in typing a variety of medical documents. Students must reach 50 words per minute in order to graduate.

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION
The student learns to use modern transcription equipment and will develop speed and accuracy during medical transcription. Transcription skills, retention skills, proof- reading/editing medical reports, and the ability to follow oral instructions are practiced. Emphasis is focused on accuracy and speed. The student will learn to efficiently transcribe and create appropriate medical documents such as: history and physical reports, consultations, chart/progress notes, X-ray reports, operative reports, and business letters.

DENTAL OFFICE PROCEDURES
The student will receive comprehensive education and training in the application of charting, tooth numbering systems, dental terminology, types of dental treatment, dental specialties and complete dental insurance details.

SELF-DIRECTED STUDIES
This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire duration of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Emphasis in this area is placed on giving the student competence in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office software, which is becoming the software of choice for most of today’s medical offices. The student becomes familiar with the operation of Microsoft’s latest office software Office 2013, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively and the Internet as an effective office tool.

COMMUNICATIONS FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
This module covers the most important rules of medical grammar, punctuation, capitalization and writing numbers. Students will test their understanding by completing exercises correlating to every rule and subject covered in the module. The module is designed to enhance the confidence of the student as to the mastery of the rules of English grammar and punctuation.

PRACTICUM
The student that meets all the work term criteria will be placed in a work environment for a six-week period.
 

Course Descriptions

DISPENSING THEORY I

This introductory course to dispensing will look at the history of eye glasses and their design. It will also include an introduction to the instruments used in a dispensary and how they work.

FABRICATION AND DISPENSING LAB I

This is a practical application course, putting to use the knowledge learned in Dispensing Theory I and an introduction to the assembly of spectacles.

CONTACT LENS THEORY I

This introductory theory course will give the student a basic knowledge of the history of contact lenses, their design, materials and contact lens terminology. Included is optics specific to contact lens fitting. Instrumentation used for fitting and health assessment will be introduced.

CONTACT LENS LAB I

This is an introductory class that will familiarize students with measurement taking using a keratometer, and verify parameters and the condition of hard and soft contact lenses as well as an introduction to the slit-lamp and its use.

OCULAR SCIENCE l

This is an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the eye and its surrounding area. Anatomical defects and the disease process will be discussed.

OPTICS I

This is an introduction to physical optics. Lens types, concepts and calculations used for lens fabrication will be explored.

COMMUNICATION AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

This is a communications course focusing on verbal and non-verbal communication skills. Cross cultural differences and how to relate to them will be discussed in this course as well.

DISPENSING THEORY II

In this dispensing theory course, the proper methods for frame adjustments and the tools used to adjust them will be studied. Rx interpretation and the relationship between frame, lens and Rx selection will be introduced.

FABRICATION AND DISPENSING LAB II

This is a hands on course of tasks discussed in dispensing theory and a continuation of fabrication of spectacles along with instruction on use of tools and measuring devices found in an on-site lab.

CONTACT LENS THEORY II

This course continues the students' learning of fitting procedures for hard and soft contact lenses. It will also give the student an understanding of the different illuminations performed using a slit-lamp. Fitting assessment, wear schedules, and indicators for contact lens wear are studied as well.

CONTACT LENS LAB II

This course will focus on the slit-lam and its illuminations. Students will also learn to fit hard spherical and back toric lenses as well as soft lens fitting for a spherical lens.

OCULAR SCIENCE II

This course is a continuation of the understanding of anatomy and physiology of the eye and its surrounding area. Systemic disease that affects the eye will also be explored.

OPTICS II

This course will look at the theory of reflection and refraction. Other topics will include simple optical systems and lens image formation.

STANDARDS OF PRACTICE I

This course will look at ethics, legislation, privacy, consent and licensing. Workplace safety regarding current procedures for infectious disease control and prevention are also reviewed.

CUSTOMER SERVICE

This course will focus on customer service skills and sensitivity training with respect to diversity and culture. Seminars and role play will be a large part of this course.

CLINICAL

This course will have two components. The first is in college, at the dispensary supervised by the Instructors, and the second will be in a work place supervised by Licensed Opticians, Optometrist or Ophthalmologists. Logs will be kept of fitting and skills learnt.

DISPENSING THEORY III

The third in our courses on dispensing eyewear will focus on multi-focal and task specific lens designs. We will look at aphakia and special considerations for dispensing to the aphakic eye. How lenses are ground generated will also be studied.

FABRICATION AND DISPENSING LAB III

This course complements dispensing theory III and continues to have the student practice frame adjustments and measurements for task specific glasses. Continued lab and spectacle assembly are practiced to better the student in a finishing lab.

CONTACT LENS THEORY III

This continuation of the two prior contact lens theory courses continues to study advanced hard and soft lens design and fitting. The student will also study complications due to contact lens wear, special lens fitting considerations and modifications with respect to contact lenses.

CONTACT LENS LAB III

This lab course compliments Contact Lens Theory III. Measurements of contact lens parameters and power, tolerances accepted for manufacturing, specialty lenses for conditions such as Keratoconus and bi-toric hard lens fitting will be examined.

OCULAR SCIENCE III

This course continues to examine anatomy and physiology of the eye and its surrounding area. Muscles of the eye both internal and external along with their function and dysfunctions will be studied.

OPTICS III

This course will study the principles and calculations used to design and order a patient/clients contact lenses based on power and measurements and look at aberrations with regards to contact lenses.

DISPENSING THEORY IV

In this course, low vision and methods for enabling use of what vision is available will be studied. Also being studied will be anisometripia and methods of correction for this condition.

FABRICATION AND DISPENSING LAB IV

This course will be a review of all aspects discussed regarding dispensing and lab work. A large amount of the focus will be in the clinic.

Course Descriptions

PHR – 102 PHARMACEUTICAL MATHEMATICS I (60 hours)

The student will review mathematical fundamentals and develop a working knowledge of the various systems of metric, apothecary, and imperial weights and measures encountered in the pharmacy which will enable the student to accurately prepare prescriptions. The student will become familiar with strength designations and will perform various dosage calculations and interpret drug orders.

PHR – 103 KEYBOARDING (36 hours)

Keyboarding is a foundation skill required for effective computer usage. By use of an all–in–one self–paced keyboarding instruction program, the student will develop proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is placed on speed and accuracy. A typing speed of 40 wpm is required for completion of this module.

PHR – 104 DRUG NAMES AND CLASSES (39 hours)

This course will take place throughout the program, enabling the student to become familiar with the brand name, the generic name, the pronunciation and the drug classification of the top 400 drugs commonly used in Canada.

PHR – 105 BASIC CONCEPTS IN PHARMACOLOGY (60 hours)

Pharmacology is one of the most challenging subjects for those embarking on careers in pharmacy and the health sciences. In this introductory module, the student will be introduced to the history and practice of pharmacy and the historical and current role that pharmacy, the pharmaceutical industry, and government play in the delivery of health care. The evolving role of the pharmacy technician will be examined and the student will be introduced to terminology related to the pharmacy profession. Also discussed will be Canadian drug regulation and approval along with drug classes, schedules and categories. Various dosage forms, including their advantages and disadvantages, along with methods of drug delivery and what happens after a drug has been administered will be presented. Knowledge of the routes of administration allows the student to comprehend how a particular drug reaches its target site.

PHR – 106 INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT OFFICE (40 hours)

Emphasis in this module is placed on giving the student fundamental competence in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office 2007 software which, increasingly, is becoming the software of choice for most of today’s businesses. The student will also learn to use e-mail to communicate productively and the Internet as an effective business tool. Emphasis is placed upon learning the knowledge and skills required to enable individuals to perform efficiently and collaboratively as a member of the healthcare team.

PHR – 107 DISPENSING LAB I (40 hours)

This module will introduce the student to pharmacy dispensing software and will cover the basics of pharmaceutical dispensing: entering a prescription, collecting and managing the patient profile, and processing a prescription. At the completion of the course, the student will be able to perform the basics of dispensing while utilizing a pharmacy dispensing software system.

PHR – 201 APPLIED ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (96 hours)

This course is unique in offering the foundational knowledge of anatomy and physiology accompanied by the corresponding medical terminology. The identification of medical words is taught through word analysis (prefixes, root words and suffixes). Emphasis will be placed on the structure and function of the major body systems and the pathophysiology of common diseases and conditions associated with each system. The student will become familiar with clinical procedures, laboratory tests and abbreviations related to each system and other specialized areas of medicine. Completion of this course will allow the student to confidently communicate with other health care professionals and patients and will aid the student in their understanding of pharmacological concepts.

PHR – 202 PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS I (48 hours)

A comprehensive, interdisciplinary perspective drawing upon core concepts of anatomy, physiology and pathology will be used in order to make drug therapy more understandable. The student will expand his/her previously learned core concepts in pharmacology via a disease and body system approach. The student will learn the therapeutic effects of prescription medications, non-prescription medications and alternative therapies commonly used in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases that affect the nervous, cardiovascular and urinary systems. Using the prototype approach to drug therapy, the student will learn the brand and generic names and classifications of common medications in Canada along with their mechanisms of action, major side-effects, contraindications, dosage forms and routes of administration.

PHR – 203 NON–STERILE COMPOUNDING TECHNIQUES (180 hours)

In this module, the student will develop the complex skills and the professional demeanour necessary to take on the increasingly important role of compounding various pharmaceutical products to meet the specific needs of the patient. The student will learn to compound non–sterile products, including calculation of the correct amount of each ingredient and the use of the correct compounding equipment with the proper techniques. WHMIS protocols will also be learned. Practice will include compounding lotions, creams, ointments, solutions, suspensions, gels and capsules along with preparing other non–traditional compounds such as suppositories, lollipops, lip balms and gummi–bears. Proper and timely cleaning and maintenance of compounding equipment will also be stressed. Emphasis is placed on accuracy and the preparation of a pharmaceutically elegant product.

PHR – 204 PHARMACEUTICAL MATHEMATICS II (54 hours)

Advanced calculations in IV, TPN and chemotherapy preparations along with pediatric dosing and preparing dilutions will be included in this module in order to prepare the student for employment in a hospital pharmacy. Accuracy is stressed throughout the course along with techniques to detect and reduce medication errors.

PHR – 205 THE PROFESSIONAL PHARMACY TECHNICIAN (24 hours)

Principles relating to the role of the pharmacy technician, professional manner and image, attitude, initiative, accountability, adapting to change, accepting criticism, motivation, ethics, interpersonal relations, group dynamics, team building, conflict resolution, leadership, teamwork, problem–solving and other workplace issues are investigated. Through simulations, activities and role–playing of patient–technician and technician–healthcare team situations, the student will learn the knowledge and skills required to enable them to perform professionally and confidently as a member of the healthcare team.

PHR – 207 DISPENSING LAB II (40 hours)

This module will build the student’s proficiency in using pharmacy dispensing software as they move on to completing the entire dispensing process with simulated prescriptions and medications. Successful completion of this course will include processing 100 uncomplicated prescriptions without error.

PHR – 301 RETAIL AND LONG–TERM CARE PHARMACY (81 hours)

The student will practice receiving, dispensing and releasing prescriptions through simulations, role–playing, and other techniques. Emphasis is placed on the correct dispensing techniques, including computer entry, measuring, labeling, packaging, product presentation, and prescription processing. The student will build his/her skills of receiving, dispensing and releasing prescriptions. The role of community and long–term care pharmacies, including the various equipment and devices used in these environments, will also be explored. Students will gain efficiency, speed and accuracy in selecting and processing pharmaceutical products using drug interchangeability information, third–party and formulary restrictions and other resources. He/she will also learn inventory management of medications, including narcotics and controlled drugs, along with various clerical functions.

PHR – 302 PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS II (75 hours)

This continuation of pharmacology and therapeutics will cover the therapeutic effects of prescription medications, non–prescription medications and alternative therapies commonly used in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases that affect various body systems such as the immune, respiratory, visual, auditory, gastrointestinal, reproductive and endocrine systems. Using the prototype approach to drug therapy, the students will learn the brand and generic names and classifications of common medications in Canada along with their mechanisms of action, major side-effects, contraindications, dosage forms and routes of administration.

PHR – 303 HOSPITAL PHARMACY (45 hours)

The student will be introduced to the hospital environment including its structure, organization, and the role in health–care delivery. The roles of the hospital pharmacist, pharmacy technician, and other health care professionals will be discussed. The various drug–distribution systems used in hospitals will be presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. The student will be introduced to medication order processing as well as the role of a drug formulary in a hospital setting. Purchasing and inventory control and record–keeping requirements are also discussed.

PHR – 304 STERILE PRODUCT PREPARATION (68 hours)

In both health care facilities and community pharmacies, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians aseptically prepare sterile products. Students will be introduced to the basic principles of microbiology as they relate to the practice of pharmacy along with the concepts of sterility, aseptic technique, sterilization methods, infection control and incompatibilities. The student will gain practical experience in the correct preparation, measuring, computer entry, labelling and packaging of the sterile hospital prescription, including IV Admixtures, TPNs and ophthalmic preparations, according to appropriate standards of practice relating to the preparation of sterile products in the pharmacy. Emphasis is placed on accurate dispensing techniques, including methods of checking work for accuracy, while also ensuring sterility of the product.

PHR – 305 COMMUNICATION & CUSTOMER CARE (38 hours)

The student will develop good verbal and written communication skills while caring for the customer. The communication process, types and methods of communication, and barriers to communication will be discussed. Caring for customers and patients and maintaining confidentiality will be emphasized. Verbal communication will be enhanced through effective use of the telephone and simulating patient–technician/technician–healthcare situations. Throughout the course, the student will become familiar with the operation of Microsoft’s Office 2007 software as a means of written communication, will use e–mail to communicate productively, and will use reputable Internet sources for research.

PHR – 306 EMPLOYMENT PREPARATION (15 hours)

This module will prepare the student for employment. The student will produce an effective and professional resume, cover letter and thank you letter in preparation for gaining employment as a pharmacy technician. The student will gain an understanding of current hiring practices as well as effective interview and job search techniques while participating in role–playing exercises to further his/her skills. A mock employment interview will be conducted during the course in order to prepare the student for gaining employment.

PHR – 307 DISPENSING LAB III (105 hours)

This final module on dispensing will allow the student to practice drug distribution and dispensing within a simulated retail and hospital environment, including performing an independent double check on prescriptions/medication orders, filing and scanning prescriptions, blister packaging, compounding, interacting with the customer, enhancing communication skills, teaching device usage to patients, practicing inventory control and collaborating inter-professionally with the pharmacist. Completion of 100 prescriptions without error in each dispensing position will be one requirement of successfully completing this course.

PHR – 401 CLINICAL RETAIL PHARMACY EXPERIENCE (CRPE) (160 hours)

At the completion of the program, the student will participate in a four–week retail pharmacy experience in order to continue his/her training as a pharmacy technician. Specific objectives must be met in order to complete this module successfully. Successful completion of this module is mandatory for graduation from the program.

PHR – 402 CLINICAL HOSPITAL PHARMACY EXPERIENCE (CHPE) (160 hours)

At the completion of the program, the student will participate in a four–week hospital pharmacy experience in order to continue his/her training as a pharmacy technician. Specific objectives must be met in order to complete this module successfully. Successful completion of this module is mandatory for graduation from the program.

BUS – 665 SELF – DIRECTED STUDIES

This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one–on–one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire length of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.
 

Course Descriptions

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

This course provides a comparative review of the gross and microscopic anatomy as well as basic physiology of selected species. Topics will include organs, organ systems, and organ system functions within the animal body. Students will also learn the fundamentals of medical terminology.

LAB PROCEDURES I

The student will learn and be able to identify the various internal and external parasites encountered in veterinary medicine, as well as components of urine, and the importance of testing. The student will also perform urinalysis and parasite testing.

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT

This course will deal with client relations, scheduling appointments, telephone techniques, client education, record keeping and effective communication. There will be a strong focus on veterinary medical terminology. The student will also receive an introduction to Veterinary Practice Management Software. There will be discussion on euthanasia, grief and the human-animal bond. Upon completion of this course, students will be effective veterinary receptionists and demonstrate excellent customer service techniques.

CALCULATIONS

Students will learn how to problem solve, to understand drug labels and calculate drug dosages, to calculate IV fluid rates, and become familiar with various units of measure and conversion between units.

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

Basic animal behaviors such as how sick and healthy animals communicate as well as inappropriate behaviors are covered in this course. Housetraining and interacting with animals in a clinic situation will be emphasized. Learn to understand normal behavior of domestic animals and recognize signs of pain, aggression, or fear as encountered in veterinary practices and interacting with these animals appropriately.

SMALL ANIMAL NUTRITION/LARGE ANIMAL NUTRITION

After learning the basic principles of nutrition, students will then be shown how to apply this knowledge when reading labels, or advising clients on what diets are available for different life stages and disease processes. Topics discussed will include: nutritional goals, nutrients vs. ingredients, pet food production, forage recognition, equine diets, special diets, and client counselling.

CLINICAL EXERCISES (SPCA/CLINIC)

This course includes field trips to the local SPCA to help facilitate the practical skills acquired within the animal nursing 1 and 11 courses. While here the student gains hands-on experience with basic husbandry, restraint, medication administration, as well as wound cares.

ANIMAL NURSING I

This course will provide the student with the knowledge and practical skills necessary to develop various small animal nursing skills. The student will learn how to restrain and safely examine animals as well as administer medications, collect diagnostic samples for interpretation, and perform minor procedures including pedicure, ear cleanings, and urinary catheterizations.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This course is a continuation of the material learned in Anatomy and Physiology 101. The student will continue to learn of gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy and physiology of selected species.

LAB PROCEDURES II

The student will learn the basic components of blood. Emphasis will be placed on the erythron and clotting functions. The student will learn to perform basic hematology testing involved in a Complete Blood Count.

DISSECTION

The student will dissect preserved/fresh specimens and identify various organs and structures.

IMMUNOLOGY AND DISEASES

An introduction to the immune system including the structure and function of lymph nodes, bone marrow and leukocytes. Topics include the immune response, active and passive immunity, hypersensitivities, and auto immunity. Emphasis is placed on why we vaccinate, what we vaccinate for, vaccine protocols and why vaccines sometimes fail.

SURGERY II (THEORY)

This course will provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively monitor the anesthetized patient as well as upon surgical recovery. Learners will develop skills in the function and the use of anesthetic equipment, care, induction, and maintenance of anesthetic patients, selecting anesthetic drug protocols and troubleshooting.

CLINICAL EXERCISES

This course serves as an introduction to surgical instrumentation, preparation of surgical packs and sterilization techniques. Students will learn pre-anesthetic and pre-surgical patient preparation, sterile techniques including standard operating room conduct, opening surgical packs, as well as aseptically gowning and gloving.

SMALL ANIMAL NURSING II

This course is a continuation of the material learned in small animal nursing 140. The student will learn the skills necessary to provide quality nursing care to small animals. Material covered will include fluid therapy as well as how to administer it, wound classification, wound care and management, proper bandaging techniques as well as the basics in alternative medicine. This course has a practical component where skills are learned and assessed in combination with other courses practical skills and assessments.

LAB PROCEDURES III

The student will further study the components of blood. Emphasis will be placed on the leukogram and clinical chemistries. Care and use of various laboratory instruments will also be covered. The student will learn to perform a complete hematology panel, as well as using the various in-house blood analyzers.

THERIO AND GENETICS

Students will learn the relationship between our animal’s environment, brain, and reproductive organs. The different hormones responsible for initiating as well as controlling the reproductive cycle will be explained. Expected behavior during the estrus cycle, appropriate timing and techniques for breeding and parturition will be discussed. Basic genetics will be covered to give the student an understanding of the definitions associated with inheritance, monohybrid and dihybrid cross and how to use the Punnett square. Outbreeding, backbreeding, inbreeding, line breeding, X-linked genes and chromosomal abnormalities will be taught.

DENTISTRY

Detailed dental anatomy, charting of the mouth, understanding the cause and importance of periodontal disease, as well as treatment options and home care are all discussed. Also during the clinical exercise (VT 421 and 521), students will perform real dental cleanings on anesthetized animals.

INTRO TO PHARMACOLOGY

Introduces students to the terminology, routes of administration and mathematics unique to pharmacology.

SURGERY III

Students will be introduced to the common surgical procedures performed in the veterinary hospital. Reasons for the procedures as well as the technician’s role before, during and after each procedure will be explained.

CLINICAL EXERCISES

Students participate in actual surgeries acting as Prep nurse, OR nurse, and Surgical assistant. These are real surgeries being done on site in our NBVMA accredited clinic thus allowing first year students to become accustomed to our clinic before entering second year.

SURGERY PREP INTRO

The student will be given this time to prepare his/her assigned patient for surgery. A complete physical exam and pre-surgical blood work will be completed in this time. This will be at the end of the first year.

LAB PROCEDURES IV

The student will learn the principles and procedures behind basic cytology and microbiology. Emphasis will be placed on proper collection and preparation methods for sample evaluation.

EMERGENCY AND CRITICAL CARE

This course will educate students about the various emergencies that may be encountered in clinic and the technician’s role in these situations, including anesthetic emergencies, toxicological emergencies and cardiac arrest. We will also cover dealing with the critically ill patient, including anesthesia, medications and nutrition.

COMMON DISEASES

The student will learn about common diseases (acquired and genetic) affecting small animals. Emphasis will be placed on client education and care of the ill patient.

EXOTICS

The student will learn about the principles of animal research and the regulatory bodies that govern research. The student will learn receiving, testing and quarantine procedures. As well, the student will learn how to perform physical examinations, basic care procedures, administer medications, and collect samples for testing on species such as rabbits, ferrets, guinea pigs, mice, rats, gerbils, hamsters, avian species, non- human primates, reptiles and wildlife.

RADIOLOGY

In this course students gain an understanding and will be able to demonstrate radiology safety measures, proper care and maintenance of radiographic equipment, patient positioning, and processing of radiographs. Students will be taught how to recognize common technical errors on processed radiographs and how to correct them. The student will gain experience and develop skills with both stationary small animal and mobile large animal x-ray equipment.

PHARMACOLOGY

This course will examine common medications used in veterinary medicine, prescription dispensing, handling, storing and documentation of controlled substances, routes and methods of drug administration. Students will develop a working knowledge of veterinary medications, terminology, proper handling, administration and possible side effects of drugs and prescription dispensing protocol.

CLINIC EXERCISES

Students participate in actual surgeries acting as Prep nurse, OR nurse, Surgical assistant, and Anesthetist. These are real surgeries being done on site in our NBVMA accredited clinic thus allowing students to practice their skills through real hands on experience.

SURGERY PREP

The student will be given this time to prepare his/her assigned patient for surgery. A complete physical exam and pre-surgical blood work will be completed in this time.

POST OP

Through a combination of photos and notes taken by instructors, all surgeries are discussed and examined as a group to allow students to learn from each other’s experiences.

LARGE ANIMAL NURSING

Through a combination of lectures and field trips, students will learn how to safely handle and work around cattle, horses and sheep. As well, methods for blood collection, parenteral injections and administering oral medications will be taught.

LAB V MICRO

In this course, students will learn the basics of Mycology, Microbiology and Virology, as well as how to collect, store and culture various micro-organisms.

PRACTICUM

The student is placed on a 6-week practicum session.
 

Course Descriptions

HARDWARE FUNDAMENTALS
By course end a student should have an understanding of basic PC hardware, and should know how to recognize, clean, handle, install, diagnose, understand the function of, and know the different types of each of the following components:

  • CPU’s
  • CD and DVD media drives
  • RAM
  • Sound and Video card
  • Motherboards
  • Monitors
  • Cases, and power supplies
  • Modems & NICs
  • ROM / CMOS, firmware
  • Printers
  • Expansion buses
  • Cables and connectors
  • Floppy drives
  • Laptops and docking stations
  • IDE drives
  • Network hubs, cabling, wireless
  • SCSI devices
  • Fans and Heat sinks
  • Keyboards, mice


OPERATING SYSTEM ESSENTIALS
This module introduces students to the world of computer operating systems. Focus will be aimed at preparing students to support Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7 client systems in a home or office environment.

The primary goal of this module is to ensure students have advanced knowledge in preparing computers for operating system deployments, using the built-in administrative utilities to extract the optimal performance and security from the operating system and the ability to recognize problems and recover from them effectively. Equal emphasis will be shown to administration of home computers as to computers in a corporate environment. Among the many topics covered, students will become skilled at performing routing procedures at the command line.

This module, in combination with the Hardware Fundamentals module, is designed to help prepare students for CompTIA’s A+ certification exams (220-801 and 220-802), Microsoft Technology Associate certification exam for Operating System Essentials (98- 349) and Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist exam for Windows 7 configuration (70-680).

MICROSOFT NETWORKING ESSENTIALS
Upon completion the student will be able to:

  • Understand the concepts of Internet, intranet, and extranet, including: VPN, security zones, & firewalls.
  • Understand local area networks (LANs) & wide area networks (WANs) covering: perimeter networks; addressing; reserved address ranges for local use (including local loopback ip), VLANs; wired LAN and wireless LAN, leased lines, dial-up, ISDN, VPN, T1, T3, E1, E3, DSL, Cable, etc. and their characteristics (speed, availability).
  • Understand wireless networking. Types of wireless networking standards and their characteristics (802.11A,B,G,N including different Ghz ranges), types of network security (WPA/WEP/802.1X etc.), point-to-point (P2P) wireless, wireless bridging

UNDERSTANDING NETWORK HARDWARE

  • Understand switches, including managed or unmanaged switches; VLAN capabilities; Layer 2 and Layer 3 switches, security options; hardware redundancy; support; backplane speed; switching types, MAC table; understanding capabilities of hubs vs. Switches.
  • Understand router transmission speed, directly connected routes, static routing, dynamic routing (routing protocols), default routes; routing table and how it selects best route(s); routing table memory, NAT, software routing in Windows Server
  • Understand media types: cable types and their characteristics, including media segment length and speed; fibre optic; twisted pair shielded or nonshielded; catxx cabling, wireless; susceptibility to external interference (machinery, power cables, etc); susceptibility to electricity (lightning), susceptibility to interception.
  • Understand the OSI model and the TCP model; examples of devices, protocols, applications and which OSI/TCP layer they belong to; TCP and UDP; well-known ports for most used purposes, packets and frames.
  • Understand IPv4 & IPv6 including such topics as: subnetting; IPconfig; why use IPv6; addressing; ipv4toipv6 tunnelling protocols to ensure backwards compatibility; dual IP stack; subnet mask; gateway; ports; packets; reserved address ranges for local use (including local loopback IP);
  • Understand names resolution methods such as: DNS, WINS, steps in the name resolution process, and networking services like: DHCP, remote access
  • Finally coverage of troubleshooting tools such as ping; tracert; pathping; Telnet; IPconfig, and netstat.

This module is designed to assist students in their preparation for the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) certification exam (98-366).

ACTIVE DIRECTORY
This module teaches students, through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, textbook exercises, and classroom labs, the skills and knowledge which form the foundation of preparation necessary for administering an Active Directory Domain Services implementation on Windows Server 2008.

The module begins by examining planning an Active Directory deployment including advanced concepts in DNS deployment. Subsequent topics are devoted to user and group administration, physical considerations when deploying Active Directory and group policy deployment.
This module will also include a one week hands-on project where students are presented with a real-world case study and prepare that enterprise network in class.

This module is designed to assist students in their preparation for the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) certification exam (70-640).

WINDOWS SERVER NETWORK SERVICES
This module examines the setup and administration of networking services essential to the proper operation of a Windows domain environment.

The module examines configuring Windows Server as a web server, a DNS server, a DHCP server, a network router, a remote access server, a file and print server and other associated topic areas.

This module will also include a one week hands-on project where students are presented with a real-world case study and prepare that enterprise network in class

LINUX
Students will be introduced to installing, configuring and managing both Debian-based and Red Hat-based distributions of Linux. Topics covered include command-line administration, user and group maintenance, and file system manipulation. Students will become familiar with both the KDE and GNOME desktop environments.

SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS
This module provides further refinement of the core concepts in securing a Windows Server from the numerous dangers that threaten them. The ability to detect risk and recommend security countermeasures is a key skill that will be developed throughout this module. Students will learn to detect and categorizes various forms of malware as well as detect and combat social engineering and phishing attacks.

The user authentication process will be studied as well as the forms of access control available to Windows Server administrators. The fundamentals of cryptography including encryption, digital certificates and the public key infrastructure are also covered in detail.

This module is designed to assist students in their preparation for the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) certification exam (98-367).

ETHICAL HACKING
Students will develop the foundations to secure a network and to become a better network administrator. This course prepares students to defend their corporate environment against malicious attackers by exploring the world of hacking. Students will learn the techniques and methods used by real hackers to compromise systems in order to discover ways their environments might be vulnerable to these attacks.

Among the hacking techniques discussed will be reconnaissance methods, using automated scanning tools to profile a network or computer system, using malware to compromise system security, password cracking, denial of service and distributed denial of service attacks, and compromising wireless security. The material in this course will also help prepare a student for CompTIA’s Security+ certification exam and the EC-Council’s Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) exam.

CISCO ROUTERS
Students learn configuration of Cisco routers and switches using Cisco’s IOS. The following topics will be covered: introduction to Internetworking Technology, concepts and commands required to configure Cisco Routers and switches in small to medium multi-protocol networks, experience configuring fully operational Cisco routers and switches, apply Cisco IOS software commands to start up and configure a newly installed router and switch, perform all basic configuration procedures to build a multi- router, multi-group network that uses LAN and WAN interfaces for the most commonly used routing and routed protocols. The student will be able to challenge for Cisco’s CCNA and CCENT certifications.
 

Course Descriptions

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY
This course introduces the sciences of anatomy and physiology and the basic structure, functions and assessment of the human body in its state of wellness. Integration of systems and maintenance of homeostasis within the body will also be discussed.

COMMUNICATION AND PROFESSIONALISM
Through an interactive classroom environment the student will gain the basic skills and techniques necessary to communicate appropriately with staff, patients, clients, families and other health care providers and emergency personnel. Focus will also be given to the importance of proper documentation and reporting. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, and journals, role playing and guest speakers. Skills in the class are practiced throughout remaining courses and semesters.

PRE-CLINICAL PARAMEDICAL THEORY
Through an interactive classroom setting, students will gain knowledge of theory related to the foundation of appropriate response and delivery of care. Students will know and practice the principles behind the skills required for health assessment that will be delivered in medical and traumatic situations. As well, students will be able to use and understand the terminology used in paramedicine.

SKILLS LAB I
This course will include an introduction to the skills required to be able to gather patient information, assess the patient's condition, and initiate medical interventions. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to perform basic skills that are commonly required in the care of patients. These skills are required in acute, long term and community settings. The student must be successful in both the theory and all lab components of this course.

NUTRITION & HEALTHY LIVING
This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living. It also fosters patients' learning and practice of self care practices and how these relate to total patient health. This class will include in class theory as well as activities.

CLINICAL PRACTICE
During this series of clinical courses, students will provide care, education and interventions in practice. Clinics may be held on site or in a variety of agency/clinical settings. Clinics will be sequenced appropriately based on theory material covered. Clinical practice will be experienced in a variety of community and institutional settings in order to introduce students to different populations and health settings.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
This theory course will introduce human diseases and the fundamentals of homeostatic mechanisms. Mechanisms of disease and how alterations to body systems affect healthy structure and function will be illustrated through exploring common disease states. This is an extensive course that will be delivered in modules covering of the systems and related interventions and responses to each condition, disease or symptom in a systematic approach.

PRACTICE STANDARDS FOR HEALTH CARE IN CANADA
This course introduces the ethical and legal responsibilities of practise. Discussion centers on provincial and national regulations. Students will learn the code of ethics, quality controls and protection of the public along with in depth discussion on professional responsibilities.

PARAMEDICAL PRACTISE II
This course is continued from the Paramedical Practise I course. Students will gain an understanding of the theory required for the treatment of more complex cases.

SKILLS LAB II
The lab experience will continue to be a time for students to integrate their knowledge and skills in providing simulated care to fellow students and simulation equipment. The level of care the students will be able to provide will be of a higher level and their critical thinking will be tested with each scenario given.

SPECIALTY PRACTISE HEALTH CARE
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the process of care that is required in trauma, mental health and other specialty areas of practise.

PHARMACOLOGY
This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and the basic drug groups and uses. Proper terminology and the familiarization of their uses in planning and delivery of care will be discussed. Topics covered will include: drug nomenclature, legal issues, pharmaco-kinetics and principles of pharmacology.

MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION/IV
This course teaches the basic concepts of pharmacological theory and the skills necessary to safely administer medications through oral, rectal and injectable sites. The student will also learn the proper administration techniques of IV initiation and it's responsibilities and legal implications.

CLINICAL FEEDBACK
During weekly sessions students ill bring topics for discussion to class from clinical/community activities to share learning with classmates and faculty. This will also be a forum for discussing pertinent issues related to patient care, process and placements that are important to address with faculty. Portions of this class will be used to discuss issues related to procedures, practise, progression and performance expectations as students gain more knowledge.

PRACTICUM
Students will be placed in offsite settings for 12-16 weeks as they become integrated in a real life setting and practise the summative nature of the day to day work of a paramedic. Students may be required to gain membership to the association in order to perform all duties required for completion of the program. This portion of the program is intended to allow students to gain exposure to a variety of settings under the supervision of a mentor.

Students will be expected to perform effectively as a paramedic team member, demonstration professional patient and inter-professional relationships and work practises.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

*Although some clinic/lab sessions will be on site, students will be responsible for travel and costs associated with relocation, travel and other, to access assigned clinical sites. Clinical rotations are scheduled throughout the program.

*Fees for interim licence, provincial registration and licensure and national exam fees are not included. Eligibility for exam writing and licensure for employment is dependent on program accreditation. Students must acknowledge program status.

*Because of the nature of work of a paramedic, understanding the mental and physical demands of the profession is the key to your success.

Additional training to include: Back in Form, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, WHIMIS, CPR and First Aid.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS AND ETHICS

This module will provide the students with knowledge of ethics and law in dentistry and the dental assisting profession. The class will consist of instruction and practical role playing experiences that will allow the student to implement their communication skills in the dental office and with the public.

COMMUNICATIONS AND DENTAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

Students will gain an understanding of the roles of a receptionist and how to communicate effectively. Understanding the psychology of a patient, the proper maintenance of a patient file, accounts payable/receivable, payroll and insurance form procedures and processing will be taught. Basic banking procedures commonly used will also be covered.

MICROBIOLOGY

Oral microbiology will focus on the study of microorganisms existing in the oral cavity. Knowledge of microbiology and the role of infectious diseases in the dental office will be covered.

INTRO TO CLINIC

The students will complete the theory required to be able to confidently practice in a clinical setting. Sterilization, disinfection and orientation to the office and clinical set up will be taught and reinforced through clinical experience.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will include an orientation to the structures of the human body and the functions within them. Topics covered: parts of the cell to the major body systems and how they work together.

DENTAL SCIENCES

This course will educate the students in dental sciences including embryology, landmarks of the oral cavity and components of the dentition. Applying the information to a clinic setting by demonstrating the ability to complete a patient record will be achieved.

DENTAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will educate the students in dental health, allowing them to recognize, explain, and demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques to their patients. The skills required to perform preventative dental assisting tasks will be demonstrated in a clinic setting as students practice on a typodont, each other and graduate to patient care. This course also covers basic nutrition theory that will allow the student to be able to discuss the relationship between diet and good dental health with their patients. Community dental health projects will be prepared and delivered throughout the year.

PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

A dental assistant student will gain the understanding of objectives related to the classification of drugs, how they affect dental procedures and how to use drug reference material, including understanding prescriptions. The knowledge and understanding of medical emergencies and how to assist during one of these emergencies is key to a dental practice.

RADIOLOGY

Basic principles of physics and radiography will be covered, ensuring that the student understands the importance of radiology and the safety precautions required to operate a dental X-ray unit. Techniques will be taught in class and practical experience will be gained later in the program.

RESTORATIVE

Chair side intra-oral procedures and processes will be detailed in a classroom setting, demonstrated evaluated in the clinic. The student will learn to recognize and understand the procedures, instruments and materials used to complete common restorative appointments.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY/ORAL PATHOLOGY

This course will provide the student with a detailed description of the head and neck region including theory as it relates to the bones, muscles, nerves, and blood supply. This course will also present the student with material on diseases of the oral cavity and diagnostic information that a dentist would use to determine pathologies. The course consists of classroom material enhanced with a series of instructor handouts and visual materials.

DENTAL SPECIALTIES

This module is comprised of a series of seminars derived from dental specialties. Information will be delivered as it relates to the practice of a dental assistant in any specialty office. The course is supported by a series of guest speakers and office rotations.

DENTAL RECORDS

Tooth morphology and proper charting will be covered during this module. A clinical chart will be discussed in depth including details on obtaining information and being able to complete a chart in detail. Students will learn how to complete a chart and to understand the importance of being able to communicate the information to the patient.

LABORATORY PROCEDURES

Taking place in a lab setting, combined with classroom instruction, students will learn the methods of lab procedures such as taking impressions, pouring and trimming models and preparing custom trays.

PATIENT CARE CLINIC

This module will provide the student with the opportunity to learn hands on and be evaluated on all aspects of clinical dental assisting. The complete process of client care will be brought together in a “real” clinic setting as the student schedules patients to be treated in a supervised patient clinic.

RADIOLOGY LAB

The student will practice radiology techniques on a typodont, including safety, exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs.

PRACTICUM

Five weeks of supervised practical clinical experience will be achieved. Student’s time will be spent in a general dentistry practice and have hands-on practice.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS AND ETHICS

This module will provide the students with knowledge of ethics and law in dentistry and the dental assisting profession. The class will consist of instruction and practical role playing experiences that will allow the student to implement their communication skills in the dental office and with the public.

COMMUNICATIONS AND DENTAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

Students will gain an understanding of the roles of a receptionist and how to communicate effectively. Understanding the psychology of a patient, the proper maintenance of a patient file, accounts payable/receivable, payroll and insurance form procedures and processing will be taught. Basic banking procedures commonly used will also be covered.

MICROBIOLOGY

Oral microbiology will focus on the study of microorganisms existing in the oral cavity. Knowledge of microbiology and the role of infectious diseases in the dental office will be covered.

INTRO TO CLINIC

The students will complete the theory required to be able to confidently practice in a clinical setting. Sterilization, disinfection and orientation to the office and clinical set up will be taught and reinforced through clinical experience.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will include an orientation to the structures of the human body and the functions within them. Topics covered: parts of the cell to the major body systems and how they work together.

DENTAL SCIENCES

This course will educate the students in dental sciences including embryology, landmarks of the oral cavity and components of the dentition. Applying the information to a clinic setting by demonstrating the ability to complete a patient record will be achieved.

DENTAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will educate the students in dental health, allowing them to recognize, explain, and demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques to their patients. The skills required to perform preventative dental assisting tasks will be demonstrated in a clinic setting as students practice on a typodont, each other and graduate to patient care. This course also covers basic nutrition theory that will allow the student to be able to discuss the relationship between diet and good dental health with their patients. Community dental health projects will be prepared and delivered throughout the year.

PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

A dental assistant student will gain the understanding of objectives related to the classification of drugs, how they affect dental procedures and how to use drug reference material, including understanding prescriptions. The knowledge and understanding of medical emergencies and how to assist during one of these emergencies is key to a dental practice.

RADIOLOGY

Basic principles of physics and radiography will be covered, ensuring that the student understands the importance of radiology and the safety precautions required to operate a dental X-ray unit. Techniques will be taught in class and practical experience will be gained later in the program.

RESTORATIVE

Chair side intra-oral procedures and processes will be detailed in a classroom setting, demonstrated evaluated in the clinic. The student will learn to recognize and understand the procedures, instruments and materials used to complete common restorative appointments.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY/ORAL PATHOLOGY

This course will provide the student with a detailed description of the head and neck region including theory as it relates to the bones, muscles, nerves, and blood supply. This course will also present the student with material on diseases of the oral cavity and diagnostic information that a dentist would use to determine pathologies. The course consists of classroom material enhanced with a series of instructor handouts and visual materials.

DENTAL SPECIALTIES

This module is comprised of a series of seminars derived from dental specialties. Information will be delivered as it relates to the practice of a dental assistant in any specialty office. The course is supported by a series of guest speakers and office rotations.

DENTAL RECORDS

Tooth morphology and proper charting will be covered during this module. A clinical chart will be discussed in depth including details on obtaining information and being able to complete a chart in detail. Students will learn how to complete a chart and to understand the importance of being able to communicate the information to the patient.

LABORATORY PROCEDURES

Taking place in a lab setting, combined with classroom instruction, students will learn the methods of lab procedures such as taking impressions, pouring and trimming models and preparing custom trays.

PATIENT CARE CLINIC

This module will provide the student with the opportunity to learn hands on and be evaluated on all aspects of clinical dental assisting. The complete process of client care will be brought together in a “real” clinic setting as the student schedules patients to be treated in a supervised patient clinic.

RADIOLOGY LAB

The student will practice radiology techniques on a typodont, including safety, exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs.

PRACTICUM

Five weeks of supervised practical clinical experience will be achieved. Student’s time will be spent in a general dentistry practice and have hands-on practice.

Course Descriptions

WEB DESIGN USING HTML5, CSS3 AND JAVASCRIPT

The emphasis of this module is to teach the students how to build well formatted websites using HTML5 (structure of website), Cascading Style Sheets (look and format), and JavaScript (dynamic user interaction).

Students will learn to:

  • Develop cross-browser (works in all browsers: Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, Opera) websites using XHTML, HTML5 and CSS3
  • Add dynamic user interaction using JavaScript libraries (JQuery, Prototype, Lightbox, etc)
  • Validate user input using JavaScript
  • Upload a Website to their web host
  • Configure a web server (Apache, Internet Information Services) for hosting website
  • Optimize a website for Search Engine Ranking (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.)
  • Create and maintain their own website
  • Optimize document layout for usability and accessibility
  • Validate HTML5 and CSS3 code
  • Work in a team environment with tasks and timelines, deadlines, etc.
  • Use Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 Integrated Development Environment to create websites

Students receive one year free domain name and web hosting to host their personal website, portfolio and projects

BUILDING WEB APPLICATIONS USING PHP AND MYSQL

In this module the students will continue to apply the techniques learned in the previous module (XHTML, HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript) with an emphasis on creating data-driven websites like a Shopping Cart, a Blog, a Content Management System, etc using the PHP web programming language and the MySQL database server.

The students will learn to:

  • Create data-driven dynamic websites using PHP
  • Integrating database content to generate dynamic Web pages
  • Configure the Apache Web server for hosting HTML and PHP websites
  • Use MySQL database server and querying techniques
  • Work in a team environment to build an Online Shopping Cart Website
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, project management skills
  • Use NetBeans Integrated Development Environment to create dynamic websites
  • Use MySQL Administration Tools to manage databases
  • Use the WordPress blogging tool and publishing platform

DATABASE DESIGN AND MICROSOFT SQL SERVER 2012

This module is composed of two parts:

  1. Database Design In this module, students will learn the techniques necessary to design and built a good SQL Server database using Entity Modeling and Relational Design techniques. Students will learn how to use the Microsoft Visio 2010 tool to design database models using the Chen and Crow’s foot models
  2. Querying and Programming a Microsoft SQL Server 2012 database In this module the students will learn how to implement a database from a conceptual model. Student will learn how to query, implement and maintain a database using the SQL (Structured Query Language) language. Students will be using the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio tool.

DEVELOPING ENTERPRISE WEB SOLUTIONS WITH ASP.NET 4.5

This course focuses on using the Microsoft Visual Studio® .NET environment and the Microsoft .NET platform to create an ASP.NET Web application that delivers dynamic content to a website.

The students will learn to:

  • A hands-on approach to build ASP.NET Application for the Web
  • Build dynamic SQL Server data-driven Websites
  • Create customizable Online Shopping Carts, Portals, Blogs, etc.
  • Debug and test ASP.NET web applications
  • Work with ADO.NET Data Sources and Data Controls
  • Create and consume XML Web Services
  • Incorporate AJAX/JQuery technology into ASP.NET applications
  • Validate user input using validation controls
  • Work with Master Pages, skins and themes
  • Authenticate and secure websites
  • Incorporate profiles, personalization, and membership services
  • Configure and deploy website to online hosting services
  • Work in a team environment (with deadlines, deliverables, timelines) to build an SQL Server data-driven Web Application
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, project management skills • Use the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Integrated Development Environment

OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA

This module is divided up into 2 parts:

JAVA CORE PROGRAMMING

In this module, students will learn to build Desktop Applications for different platforms (Windows, Linux, and Macintosh).

Students will learn:

  • The Core Java Programming packages
  • Object oriented software design techniques (Classes, Objects, Interfaces)
  • To design a Graphical User Interface
  • To create data-driven software
  • To use the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment for building desktop applications.

JAVA SERVLETS AND JSP WEB PROGRAMMING

In this module, students will continue applying their knowledge from the Java Core module with an emphasis on building applications for the web.

Students will learn to:

  • Build a data-driven web application using Java Server Pages and Java Servlets
  • Build a Model-View-Controller application
  • Configure Apache Tomcat Web server
  • Package and deploy web applications to web server
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, project management skills
  • Use the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment for building websites
  • Introduction to the Spring MVC Framework

Course Descriptions

PRECLINICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of dental hygiene care. Fundamentals of safe dental hygiene practice and instrumentation skills are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students’ development of the skills defined within the dental hygiene scope of practice. Skills are practiced first on manikins and later on classmates in treatment simulation sessions.

ORAL ANATOMY AND ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES
This theory course covers the recognition of the basic structures and tissues of the oral cavity in health. Emphasis is placed on procedures required to do oral assessments of clients and record findings using accepted clinical symbols according to professional practice standards.

DENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION I AND II
This theory course teaches communication techniques to facilitate management of clients in the clinical setting and to foster clients’ learning of self care practices related to general and oral health. The role of nutrition in maintenance of optimal health is discussed. As students progress to the next levels of health promotion they will discusses the physical, intellectual, and socio-economic factors which influence clients’ decisions and actions in maintaining their oral health and accessing oral health care. Emphasis is placed on individualizing oral self care messages for clients across the lifespan. Nutrition and how it relates to total client care is the focus in HYG-204.

RADIOGRAPHY I AND II
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the history, development and use of radiation in the diagnosis of dental disease. The principles of proper exposure, processing, handling and storage of dental diagnostic radiographs are covered. Radiation hygiene required to protect client and operator from hazardous exposure levels is emphasized. The laboratory portion of the course allows students to refine exposure techniques for standard intraoral views using manikins. Bisecting angle, paralleling and occlusal plane techniques are studied. Clinical simulations with classmates and exposures for clients are also part of the laboratory requirements.

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology pertinent to the dental hygienists’ role in overall health assessment of clients prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and on-going oral care.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology of the head and neck pertinent to the dental hygienists roll in the overall health assessment prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and ongoing oral care.

CLINICAL PRACTICE
During this series of clinical courses students will provide education and clinical treatment interventions to clients who require simple to complex protocols for maintenance of oral health.

THEORY OF DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE
This theory course supports clinical practice by discussing the elements of the dental hygiene process of care and how to apply it in the assessment, planning and delivery of oral care services to clients. Portions of class time are used to discuss issues related to clinical procedures, progress and performance expectations as students gain greater expertise in clinical skills.

HEALTH STATUS ASSESSMENT
This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and discusses the basic drug groups and their uses. The relationship of drug therapies for systemic illness to the implications for planning and delivery of oral care for clients is emphasized.

ORAL HISTOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY
This theory course introduces students to the study of oral tissues in health and disease at the cellular level. Emphasis is on the process of disease and the body’s natural defense mechanisms to counter damage.

PERIODONTICS
This course examines, in detail, the structures and tissues of the periodontium in health and progressing to states of disease. The factors that initiate and sustain periodontal disease are studied and interventions designed to maintain periodontal health are emphasized. The role of the dental hygienist as a primary health care provider in implementing evidence-based therapies to halt the disease process and assist in regaining and maintaining periodontal health is emphasized. During this course students will explore advanced techniques for treatment of periodontal disease and surgical correction of defects resulting from disease. Emphasis is placed on the collaborative role of the dental hygienist.

DENTAL MATERIALS AND LABORATORY PROCEDURES
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the characteristics of dental materials. The properties, proper manipulation and storage of common materials used in dentistry are studied. The laboratory sessions allow students to manipulate materials and create products related to dental diagnosis and treatment.

COMMUNICATION
This course emphasizes the importance of imparting or recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. The principles of doing academic research to prepare an oral report or to write a paper are studied and implemented. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letters, analytical reports etc.). The student will develop the skill to access relevant and credible resources in order to research a topic of interest to the field of dental hygiene.

DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE STANDARDS
This course introduces students to the ethical and legal responsibilities of dental hygiene practice. Discussion centers around the use of pertinent New Brunswick provincial health regulation legislation, Professional Practice Standards and the Dental Hygiene Code of Ethics as quality control mechanisms to protect the public from receiving substandard care are covered. Remedies available to clients harmed by practitioners are studied. The principles and procedures of employment search will be addressed. Students will learn how to write an effective resume. Strategies for making follow-up contacts with prospective employers and preparing for a job interview will be emphasized.

CLINIC FEEDBACK
During this weekly session students are encouraged to bring topics for discussion from activities and situations which arise during clinical practice. This course provides a regular forum for transfer of pertinent information among students and faculty regarding clinical practice.

COMMUNITY HEALTH
This course introduces the concept of health as applied to groups or populations. The application of the dental hygiene process of care to assess group needs and plan appropriate educational/treatment strategies is discussed. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of statistics as used to assess needs in groups or populations and their use in program planning.

SOCIAL SCIENCE
This course explores human psychological and social development over the life span. Emphasis is placed on the influence of perception, knowledge, needs and motivation on behavior. Students study the mechanisms of behavior in the dental environment and how client behavior can be modified towards habits that foster improved oral health.

ORAL PATHOLOGY
This course concentrates on the oral manifestations of systemic disease and the implications for dental hygiene interventions. Specialized radiographic and laboratory techniques used in diagnosis of oral diseases are discussed. Recognition of the indications of common diseases from diagnostic images is stressed.

PERIODONTICS II
This course is a continuation of Periodontics I (HYG 207). Students learn detailed characteristics of the structures and tissues of the periodontium as periodontal disease continues to create more advanced tissue destruction. Examination of surgical and non surgical phases of periodontal therapy and post operative periodontal health maintenance are emphasized. Treatment modalities are investigated using systematic reviews and position papers from the American Academy of Periodontology. The implications and dental hygiene care of dental implants are examined.

CLINICAL SEMINARS
The implications of medically compromised patients will be examined in relationship to oral manifestations, prevention of problems, and treatment modifications. Discussion of client case studies will expand the students’ understanding of the dental hygiene process of care and provide students with comprehensive information on the clinical management of clients, especially those with special needs, in the planning and delivery of oral care.

BIOSTATISTICS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY
Students learn basic biostatistics and how they are used to make decisions regarding delivery of publicly funded dental services to the community. The use of experimental and non-experimental research designs and statistical analyses in determining community needs, designing programs and evaluating the success of intervention strategies is addressed. Students also learn to read, understand and assess the quality of published research and the importance of this in life-long learning as a practicing professional.

COMMUNICATIONS II
Students learn how communication with peers and health care professionals differs from that with other groups. This course concentrates on completion of secondary research techniques: written and oral presentation of findings designed for peer/professional audiences.

COMMUNITY HEALTH PLACEMENTS
Field placement activities are designed to familiarize students with the realities of dental hygiene practice in specialty settings. Students will prepare for and complete assignments in designated specialties.

ORTHODONTICS THEORY AND LABORATORY
The theory portion of this course discusses the principles of assessment data collection for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Commonly used appliance systems are examined and basics of orthodontic biomechanics and tissue responses to tooth movement are studied. During the laboratory component students practice orthodontic skills on manikins and partners (limited) in simulated clinical exercises.

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Business Communication teaches you how to plan, organize and write effective, “reader friendly” business documents appropriate for use in today’s global business environment. You will learn how to write business letters, memos, reports and electronic messages. Emphasis will also be placed on proper grammar, punctuation and sentence structure.

CAREER MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to prepare Students for a two week On-Job-Training and for continued success in a business environment. Students will prepare a resume, research employment opportunities, apply for jobs, undertake a job interview and evaluate their own performance in the job application process.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I
This course will focus on the theory and practice of recording and reporting financial transactions for the purpose of preparing financial statements. The program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II
This course will focus on accounting for various types of businesses, such as partnership, sole proprietor and corporations, as well as liabilities and equity portions of the balance sheet. This course will build on BA110 and cover more complicated and diverse transactions and accounting issues.

COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING
The objective of this course is to provide the student with the basic accounting information necessary to understand how the business process is reflected in financial statements. The student will develop applied skills in analyzing business transactions to closing entries for a sole proprietor. To reach the course objective, the program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

APPLIED ACCOUNTING
In this course, the accounting student will apply all previous knowledge to complete a one month accounting cycle for a business. It will include actual documents, memos, instructions, and procedures of a simulated business.

INTRODUCTION to KEYBOARDING
This course will introduce students to touch keyboarding. The goal will be to have students type accurately to a speed of at least 30 words per minute.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, and financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

OFFICE PROCEDURES
This course will provide the student with the fundamental skills and knowledge required to succeed in the business office environment. Today's office environment requires professional people who are trained in technical office skills, interpersonal skills, and who can perform the associated duties with confidence, accuracy, and professionalism.

PAYROLL
This course is intended to provide students with a solid understanding of Canadian payroll practices and procedures. Payroll deductions, payroll taxes, remittances and payroll allowances and benefits to employees will be covered. Calculating net pays with all the deductions will also be covered, as well as records of employments, payroll record keeping and payroll journal entries.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

Students are given the opportunity to acquire internationally recognized Microsoft Certifications.

Course Descriptions

WEB DESIGN USING HTML5, CSS3 AND JAVASCRIPT
The emphasis of this module is to teach the students how to build well formatted websites using HTML5 (structure of website), Cascading Style Sheets (look and format), and JavaScript (dynamic user interaction).

Students will learn to:

  • Develop cross-browser (works in all browsers: Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, Opera) websites using XHTML, HTML5 and CSS3
  • Add dynamic user interaction using JavaScript libraries (JQuery, Prototype, Lightbox, etc)
  • Validate user input using JavaScript
  • Upload a Website to their web host
  • Configure a web server (Apache, Internet Information Services) for hosting website
  • Optimize a website for Search Engine Ranking (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.)
  • Create and maintain their own website
  • Optimize document layout for usability and accessibility
  • Validate HTML5 and CSS3 code
  • Work in a team environment with tasks and timelines, deadlines, etc.
  • Use Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 Integrated Development Environment to create websites

BUILDING WEB APPLICATIONS USING PHP AND MYSQL
In this module the students will continue to apply the techniques learned in the Web Design module with an emphasis on creating data-driven websites like a Shopping Cart, a Blog, a Content Management System, etc. using the PHP web programming language and the MySQL database server.

The students will learn to:

  • Configure Apache and PHP
  • Deploy a Web Site to the Web Server
  • Work with Strings, Numbers, and Constants
  • Work with Conditionals, Operator, Loops, and Arrays
  • Process and Validate Form Data
  • Debug and Handle Errors
  • Create dynamic, data-driven desktop Web Sites and Mobile Web Sites with MySQL
  • Handle Email and File Uploads
  • Use Sessions and Cookies
  • Secure PHP, Apache, and MySQL
  • Work with Regular Expression to Validate Inputs
  • Implement jQuery and JSON into Web Application
  • Work in a team environment with project proposals, tasks, timelines, deadlines, etc...
  • Use NetBeans Integrated Development Environment to create dynamic websites
  • Use MySQL Administration Tools to manage databases

DATABASE DESIGN AND MICROSOFT SQL SERVER 2012
This module is composed of two parts:

  1. Database Design: In this module, students will learn the techniques necessary to design and built a good SQL Server database using Entity Modeling and Relational Design techniques. Students will learn how to use the Microsoft Visio 2010 tool to design database models using the Chen and Crow’s foot models.
  2. Querying and Programming a Microsoft SQL Server 2012 database: In this module the students will learn how to implement a database from a conceptual model. Student will learn how to query, implement and maintain a database using the SQL (Structured Query Language) language. Students will be using the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio tool.

DEVELOPING ENTERPRISE WEB SOLUTIONS WITH ASP.NET 4.5
This course focuses on using the Microsoft Visual Studio® .NET environment and the Microsoft .NET platform to create an ASP.NET Web application that delivers dynamic content to a website.

The students will learn to:

  •  
  • Build dynamic SQL Server data-driven Websites
  • Create customizable Online Shopping Carts, Portals, Blogs, etc.
  • Debug and test ASP.NET web applications
  • Work with ADO.NET Data Sources and Data Controls
  • Create and consume Web Services
  • Incorporate AJAX/JQuery technology into ASP.NET applications
  • Validate user input using validation controls
  • Work with Master Pages, skins and themes
  • Authenticate and secure websites
  • Incorporate profiles, personalization, and membership services
  • Configure and deploy website to online hosting services
  • Work in a team environment (with deadlines, deliverables, and timelines) to build an SQL Server data-driven Web Application
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, and project management skills
  • Use the Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 Integrated Development Environment

OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA
This module is divided up into 2 parts:

JAVA CORE PROGRAMMING
In this module, students will learn to build Desktop Applications for different platforms (Windows, Linux, and Macintosh).

Students will learn:

  • The Core Java Programming packages
  • Object oriented software design techniques (Classes, Objects, Interfaces)
  • To design a Graphical User Interface
  • To create data-driven software
  • To use the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment for building desktop applications.

ANDROID PROGRAMMING
In this module, students will continue applying their knowledge from the Java Core module with an emphasis on building applications for the Android Platform.

Students will learn to:

  • Install and configure the Android development environment
  • Create Android activities and XML views (the screen the user sees and interacts with)
  • Handle touch/tap, long touch and swipe events
  • Work with graphic elements to accommodate various Android versions and screens sizes/resolutions
  • Work with the SQLite Database
  • Add animation to the app elements
  • Use audio and video in your app

BUILDING CROSS-PLATFORM MOBILE APPS USING JQUERY MOBILE AND PHONEGAP
The goal of this course is to provide students with the tools and knowledge to build mobile web applications using the jQuery Mobile framework and to use the PhoneGap framework to build Android Apps.

The students will learn to:

  • Create pages in jQuery Mobile
  • Add Buttons, Toolbars, and Navigation to jQuery Mobile Web Site
  • Create jQuery Mobile Forms
  • Add Dialogs and Listviews
  • Work with jQuery Mobile Themes
  • Understand the jQuery Mobile and PhoneGap API's
  • Work with jQuery Mobile Events, Methods, and Properties
  • Build, Test, Debug, and Deploy Mobile Web Apps (Device, Simulator, and Browser)
  • Use PhoneGap and jQuery Mobile to build Android Apps

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATION
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Business Communication teaches you how to plan, organize and write effective “reader friendly” business documents appropriate for use in today’s global business environment. You will learn how to write business letters, memos, reports, and electronic messages. Emphasis will also be placed on proper grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.

CAREER MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to prepare students for a two week On-Job-Training and for continued success in a business environment. Students will prepare a resume, research employment opportunities, prepare and apply for jobs, undertake a job interview, and evaluate their own performance in the job application process.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, and financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I
This course will focus on the theory and practice of recording and reporting financial transactions for the purpose of preparing financial statements. The program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

INTRODUCTION TO KEYBOARDING
This course will introduce students to touch keyboarding. The goal will be to have students type accurately to a speed of at least 30 words per minute.

BUSINESS LAW
This course will provide general overview of legal aspects of business. The law concerning contracts in various situations will be dealt with. The course is designed to give the student an understanding of business law, including consumer protection legislation, and the general legal climate in Canada.

BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS
This course introduces the students to the work performed by managers and supervisors in different industries. Students explore management concepts of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Through a series of lectures and case studies, students learn to apply the concepts to workplace situations.

HUMAN RESOURCES
This course introduces the student to the work performed by Human Resource practitioners. Students explore the concepts pertaining to Human Resource Management, such as staffing, labour relations, total compensation issues, organizational development, staff training, and work place health and safety.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This course explores the essential skills required for an entrepreneur to start a business. Writing a business plan, selecting a business name, registering business, obtaining taxation and a business number are examined. Various federal, provincial, and local business regulations that an entrepreneur must take into consideration when starting a new business including laws concerning copyrights, patents, trademarks are studied. The importance of preparing a good business plan including cash flow and sales projections, and pro forma financial statements are introduced. Student entrepreneurs may also be eligible for a $15,000 grant or a repayable unsecured loan from ACOA through their Young Entrepreneur’s Connection program.

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATION
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Students in the Business Communication course learn how to plan, organize and write effective “reader friendly” business documents appropriate for use in today’s global business environment. They will learn to write business letters, memos, reports, and electronic messages. Emphasis will also be placed on proper grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.

CAREER MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to prepare Executive Office Administration Students for a two week On-Job-Training and for continued success in a business environment. Students will prepare a resume, research employment opportunities, and apply for jobs, undertake a job interview, and evaluate their own performance in the job application process.

OFFICE PROCEDURES
This course will provide the Administrative Assistant with the additional knowledge and more opportunity to apply and build on the skills required to succeed in the business office environment. Today's office environment requires professional people who are trained in technical office skills, interpersonal skills, and who can perform the associated duties with confidence, accuracy, and professionalism.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I
This course will focus on the theory and practice of recording and reporting financial transactions for the purpose of preparing financial statements. The program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING
Students will use accounting software (Simply Accounting) which provides a practical, hands-on introduction to Simply Accounting. Students learn how to set up a company’s books, enter historical information, process current transactions, perform month end and year end transactions, and produce financial statements. They will be introduced to the following modules: general, receivable, payable, payroll, inventory and project.

KEYBOARDING
This aspect of the course places emphasis on proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is also placed on speed and accuracy by the development of skills in typing a variety of business documents. Students must reach 50 words per minute in order to graduate.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

BUSINESS WRITING
This course is designed to help students upgrade or refresh their knowledge in general business correspondence by reviewing principles of grammar, correspondence writing, and rules of on-line communication.

PAYROLL
This course, which assumes an introductory knowledge of recording financial transactions in accounting on the part of the student, is intended to provide the student with an in-depth knowledge of Canadian payroll practices and procedures. The course will be taught to the Canadian Payroll administration’s curriculum and may lead to the nationally recognized certificate as a Payroll Administer. The contract of employment, employment laws, payroll deductions, payroll taxes and remittances, payroll allowances and benefits to employees, employment insurance, workers compensation, records of employment, payroll recordkeeping, payroll journal entries and end of year procedures will be covered in order to provide the necessary competencies to create and maintain payroll systems.

Course Descriptions

ADVANCED KEYBOARDING
This aspect of the course places emphasis on proper keyboarding techniques, mastery of the keyboard, and operation of the computer. Emphasis is also placed on speed and accuracy by the development of skill in typing a variety of office documentation, including letters, memos, reports and tables.

LEGAL TRANSCRIPTION
The student learns to use modern dictating equipment. Transcription skills, retention skills, and the ability to follow oral instruction are practiced. The production of typed, ready-to-mail copies from machine dictation is stressed.

CONFLICT RESOLUTION – AN INTRODUCTION
This module of the course introduces the student to conflict resolutions skills. Even in the most traditional of practices, the concept of resolution through first mediation, then arbitration, and lastly adjudication, has reached a new level of acceptance. The student is provided with the tools necessary to assist them in becoming a key member of the legal team that recognizes the importance of conflict resolution in the most expeditious and just disposition of their clients concerns.

LEGAL DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND OFFICE PROCEDURES

- OFFICE PROCEDURES
The student learns the intricacies of the law office environment. They are introduced to the various staff members, the associates and the partners within the firm. To assist them in becoming a valuable member of a team in the legal community, they learn to recognize the various duties of each position and to appreciate the responsibilities of members of the staff within the legal profession. They receive an introduction to the preparation of legal documents, with an emphasis on proper formatting, accuracy, and proofreading skills. They are taught the steps involved in opening files for clients and maintaining those files in the areas of law which they are introduced to in the other modules of the course. The student learns the basics of legal accounting. The student becomes familiar with billable time, disbursements and accounts to clients, through scenarios from typical files at a law firm. They are introduced to PC-Law, a popular legal accounting program and taught how to apply the legal accounting knowledge to that particular program. Time management, an essential skill in the legal environment, is taught with a realistic approach based on the impact of real life situations on the ability to record and bill time.

- CIVIL LITIGATION
The student learns the basic steps on a typical civil litigation file, from opening the file and interviewing clients, to commencing proceedings and drafting pleadings. The student will explore the Rules of Court of New Brunswick. They learn to distinguish between counter claims, cross-claims and third party claims; actions, applications and motions; and judgments, default judgments and summary judgments. They explore the discovery process, pre-trial procedures, trial preparation and costs to be awarded.

- FAMILY LAW
The student learns how to navigate the procedural and transactional aspects of family law that they will encounter in the workplace. Students learn how to deal with divorce, custody and access issues with compassion while maintaining their professionalism. Separation agreements, financial statements and support orders are drafted and dissected to determine the correlation between the elements comprising them.

- WILLS AND ESTATES
The student learns the basics of estate planning, with a concentration on Wills and Powers of Attorney. Basic Will clauses are introduced and students prepare Wills based on typical scenarios. The student is introduced to the necessary forms to request Letters Probate with respect to a Last Will & Testament or Letters of Administration for a person who dies intestate (without a Will).

- CORPORATE LAW
The student learns the steps involved in incorporating a company, with an emphasis on the information required for completing forms to apply for the incorporation. By-laws, resolutions, minute books and share registers are prepared and maintained for a typical “small business” corporation.

REAL ESTATE AND PROPERTY LAW
The student is introduced to the area of real property law through real life scenarios. This module emphasizes the Land Titles System in New Brunswick, one of the most technologically advanced registry systems in the country. A historical look at the registry systems in this country, in stark contrast to the on-line PLANET browser maintained by Service New Brunswick, gives the student a well-rounded appreciation of all types of registries. The Corporate, Personal Property and Real Property Registries are accessed on-line throughout the module to reinforce how the registries work. The student learns the basic steps in opening and maintaining files, closing the property transaction and reporting to the client and their financial institution. After this introduction, the students work with their peers to complete “closings” based on typical scenarios, preparing all correspondence, documents and reports required.

LEGAL THEORY
This covers such areas of the law as an introduction to the common law legal system; the criminal law process; family law; contracts; torts; corporate law; and property law, as well as a general review of New Brunswick Statutes.

LEGAL RESEARCH
Students will learn how to use the most popular subscription legal database, Quicklaw, to research cases from every jurisdiction in Canada. Students will then learn how to prepare legal briefs of caselaw and to prepare submissions to a Court in support of legal arguments. Quicklaw is the research database of choice of most law firms in Canada.

SELF-DIRECTED STUDIES
This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire duration of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Emphasis in this area is placed on giving the student competence in Microsoft Windows and in Windows related software, which, increasingly, is becoming the software of choice for most of today’s business offices. The student becomes familiar with the operation of Microsoft’s latest office software Office2007, which includes Word, Excel, Power Point, and Outlook. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively.

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATION
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, and financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

PROFESSIONAL SALES
The role of sales has changed dramatically over the last decade, with the new image of a sales person being that of someone who is highly professional and looking to provide the customer with products or services that match their needs. The success of a sales professional hinges on his or her ability to understand the exact needs and wants of the customer and to align these with his or her product offering. The variety of sales tools will be identified. Much of the focus of the course will be on taking care of the customer through exceptional customer service.

SALES MANAGEMENT
This is a comprehensive course in sales management principles and methods featuring the allocation of priorities to the company’s sales objectives and responsibilities; formulation of sales policies; the task of planning, organizing, staffing and controlling the work of the field sales force. Understanding the human dynamic in managing salespeople and discussing some of the opportunities and challenges that sales managers face in their day-to-day work. Discussing the role of sales management in the broader corporate environment and the career opportunities that are available working in the sales and sales management functions. The course also reinforces the need for sales managers to display strong ethical behaviour with customers and employees alike.

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT
This course examines the concept of customer relationship management (CRM), its evolution and implementation. The approach is analytical and managerial, and covers: understanding issues, tools, techniques and terminology; establishment, management, mining and analysis of customer databases; assessing customer evaluation and establishing metrics; identifying, defining and understanding customer segments; estimating profitability and designing targeted marketing campaigns and customer communications. Customer relationship management explores database planning, design and creation, and focuses on the role of a CRM in a firm’s marketing strategy, with emphasis on customer relationship building and service.

MARKETING
This course provides students with their first exposure to the key concepts and theories of marketing. Through a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, guest speakers and role play, along with learning exercises such as case analyses, presentations (group and solo), a test, and a major marketing project, students will gain the knowledge to work at junior levels in the marketing and communications field.

PROMOTIONAL STRATEGY
This course covers the marketing concept of promotion, in all its form. Integrated marketing communications is introduced as the coordinating force in promotion; advertising, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling and events are explored as the key promotional techniques. The promotional process is covered from the stand- point of the firm. The course will also cover the nature and the process of communications and the impact it has on the individual and the organizational consumer.

MARKETING RESEARCH
This course provides a detailed study of the objectives, principles and methods of marketing research. Marketing research is covered from the perspective of the user as well as the practitioner of the research. This course focuses principally on providing quality information which managers can act upon. Computer based applications of mathematical and statistical techniques are used.

BUSINESS MARKETING
Firms that operate in the business-to-business marketplace are increasingly recognizing the importance of marketing’s role and contribution as a critical aspect of their operation to help them achieve their goals. The business marketing world differs in many ways from the consumer world and the company competitiveness and reputation in the business-to-business marketplace is usually a direct result of their marketing competence. This course provides the knowledge and understanding of key business- to-business market principles and process and the methodology of applying the marketing drivers.

INTERNATIONAL SALES AND MARKETING
This course focuses on theoretical and practical techniques used in selling goods and services in the international marketplace. Emphasis will be on dealing with various cultures and ethnic groups that make up the international market. Attention will be paid to adapting theoretical selling skills to fit different cultural requirements of the market, in order to achieve effective partnerships culminating in long-term relations. This class also examines the international activities of firms from a marketing perspective. While Canada is a very active trading nation in terms of both importing and exporting, the focus of this course will primarily be on exporting, particularly from the perspective of small- and medium-sized companies.

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONS
Students examine the exciting and fast-moving world of advertising and promotion. Emphasis is on the big picture, methods and media for communication, motivation and appeal, advertising objectives, copywriting, federal regulations, and competition.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

Course Descriptions

TRAVEL APPLICATIONS
This program provides travel students the opportunity to gain competency in Microsoft Windows XP and Office 2013. The students become familiar with the operation of Word PowerPoint, and Excel. Students also learn to use the Internet as an effective business tool, regarding social media and travel blogs.

HUMAN RELATIONS AND BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Students are provided with the opportunity to develop effective communication skills. The students prepare a resume, write business letters, and execute oral presentations. In the Human Relations component, emphasis is placed upon learning the skills required to perform effectively in organizations.

CUSTOMER SERVICE
This course will provide an understanding of the customer service industry and trends as well as help the student develop the skills and attitudes necessary to become a customer service professional. The importance of communication, problem solving, motivation and customer retention in the changing marketplace is also discussed and the mastery of these skills and abilities is emphasized.

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
Students will learn the characteristics of the hospitality industry. They will study the proper terminology, accommodation sectors, corporate philosophy, departmental and management structures and market segments. This will familiarize the students with the daily operations and provide a general overview of the hospitality components. They will also develop Human Resources, (training and motivational) skills in order to provide a positive and professional experience for our internal and external guests.

EVENT PLANNING
In this course, students will learn the principles involved in meeting planning, as well as understanding the dynamics and requirements of groups. Students will be introduced to the principle of selling, coordinating and delivering special events to the group market, in both a hotel setting and as an independent business.

FLIGHT ATTENDANT – AN INTRODUCTION
The student will gain knowledge of airlines policies and regulations, aviation technology, safety and emergency procedures, as well as in-flight service techniques.

WORLDWIDE GEOGRAPHY
Students will become familiar with worldwide tourist destinations. Knowledge of major tourist areas, transportation, cultures, local customs, climate and documentation are examined and supplemented through notes, maps, videos and geography textbook.

AIR TARIFFS & TICKETING
This segment of the course covers domestic, trans-border, and international air transportation. The focus of this course is on researching, understanding and quoting the lowest possible fare to meet the clients’ needs. This course focuses on basic fare calculations including special fares, trans-border and US fares, and an introduction to international fares.

TRAVEL FUNDAMENTALS
This section familiarizes the student with the Travel Industry as a whole including package and independent tours, coach tours, cruises, accommodations, ground transportation and travel insurance. Other aspects include rail travel in Canada, US and Europe, laws dealing with Travel & Tourism and a review of how the industry is structured.

SELF-DIRECTED STUDIES
This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire duration of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.

AUTOMATED RESERVATIONS
This aspect of the course enables the student to obtain a level of proficiency with the Sabre computer reservation system through hands-on training. This enables the graduate to become competent for entry-level positions performing computer reservation work. The skills covered include reservation procedures for airlines, car rentals, hotels, and tour wholesalers, retrieving general information and fares & ticketing.

FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT
This class focuses on the general elements applicable to today's restaurant, cafe, bar & lounge scene. Students are prepared to organize proper floor set and understand flow management, while maintaining and adhering to health and safety codes. Additionally students will learn about proper pricing techniques, in order to receive maximum revenue for their product.

OUT-OF-COUNTRY DESTINATION TRIP
The trip will give the student broader understanding of the travel experience. Qualifying students are provided the opportunity to participate in one out-of-country trip. Instructors will accompany the students to provide direction and insight.

PRACTICUM
The student that meets all the work term criteria will be placed in a work environment for a two-week period.

Course Descriptions

THE PROFESSION OF YOUTH CARE IN CANADA
This course provides an overview of the history, and present day practices of the profession in Canada. The profession will be examined from a theoretical perspective – psychoeducational, behavioral, systemic, disability, etc. – and from a practice perspective – residential, juvenile justice, school-based, community based, recreation, and parent education and support. Protocols, regulations, ethical considerations, teamwork concepts and human rights will also be discussed.

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS
This course will introduce students to the principals and practices of effective human relations. Students will have opportunity to integrate theory and skills development as they begin to recognize the process of human interaction. Giving and receiving feedback, assertiveness, and conflict resolution are among the special topics covered.

SELF CARE IN THE YOUTH CARE PROFESSION
Students will have the opportunity to explore and examine areas of personal stress and their maintaining variables in this course. Traditional and holistic methods of self-care will be examined in this applied course.

COMPUTERS FOR THE HUMAN SERVICES WORKPLACE
This course is designed to provide students with the level of computer literacy needed to function in today’s workplace. Utilizing a hands-on approach, general computer concepts, and the concepts of microcomputer operating systems, Internet, and word processing applications will be introduced. A personal email account will be introduced and used throughout the course to facilitate communication between students and instructors. Microsoft Office 2007 Suite: Word and PowerPoint will be covered.

EMPLOYMENT READINESS
The purpose of this course is to assist students to develop employment readiness skills. Among skills explored are: professional resume development, cover and thank you letters, interviewing skills, mock interview, and specific topics associated with professional behavior in the workplace

FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS IN INTERVIEWING
This course emphasizes the necessary skills to begin any helping relationship. Basic helping skills will be examined and practiced – active listening, reflecting, leading, challenging, paraphrasing, summarizing, etc. – through lectures, class discussions, and role play practice sessions.

CHILD ABUSE
This course takes an in-depth approach to educating students with regards to the different forms of abuse inflicted on children by adults. Emotional, physical, sexual abuse and neglect are defined and fully discussed, and symptoms and effects are identified. Special emphasis will be placed on describing the populations of children who are at-risk of abuse and why adults choose to be abusive to children. Interviewing skills for child victims of abuse will also be identified and practiced.

THE FAMILY – SYSTEMS, ISSUES, HELPING
This course will examine the family system; its communication patterns, rules, and life cycle. Students will have the opportunity to review historical and current practices through an extensive literature review and instructor led lectures. Students will also be introduced to the process of assessment, engagement, empowerment, and discharge as it relates to working with at-risk families.

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course will explore life span development (birth to death) with a primary focus on childhood and adolescence. Focus will be placed on developing an understanding of social, emotional, physical, cognitive, spiritual and psychological growth through exploring widely accepted theories.

BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT
This course will introduce students to a wide variety of applied behavioural techniques used to modify behaviours. Focus will be placed on methods to increase positive behaviour for success in any setting.

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE
The various psychopathologies related to the intellectual, social, emotional and physical sensory functioning of children and youth will be examined through the use of case studies and possible guest speakers. Psychopharmacological treatment will also be discussed.

YOUTH AND DEVIANCE IN CANADA
This course, facilitated through lectures, class discussions, field trips and guest speakers, will introduce the student to the concepts and theories associated with adolescence, delinquency and youth culture. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to history of delinquency, youth crime statistics, youth as victim, schools and delinquency, female deviance, and the Juvenile Justice Act.

GROUP DYNAMICS AND THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY PLANNING
This course provides opportunities for the student to utilize the skills and techniques of the group process in social and work situations. The focus is on group behavior in therapy settings and the use of various techniques, methods and approaches within the group process with children, adolescents, and families. Students will apply this theoretical knowledge to a wide array of therapeutic activity planning exercises.

COMMUNICATIONS II: REPORTING IN CHILD AND YOUTH CARE
This course will focus primarily on reports generated by Youth Care Workers. Students will have the opportunity to develop an Individualized Care Plan, Incident Reports, Weekly Reviews, Care Plan Updates, and Daily Logs through this case-study guided module.

CRISIS INTERVENTION
This course will provide students with theoretical knowledge and practical skills for managing crisis situations when in the field. Based on the premise that crisis is opportunity, students will learn intervention methods and safe practices through lectures and certifications. Certifications include, but are not limited to, Non Violent Crisis Intervention and Suicide Intervention.

INDEPENDENT DIRECTED SEMINAR
This course will assist students to develop their research and oral presentation skills in an area of mutual interest between the student and the instructor. It is intended that this seminar will be added to the student’s professional portfolio.

CHILD AND YOUTH CARE IN THE SCHOOL SETTING
This specialty course will assist students to further develop their skills for work in the educational setting. Topics discussed include professional practice, integration, special education planning, participating in the IEP process, and supporting children with exceptionalities. Up-to-date information will be provided by experts in the field when possible.

CHILD AND YOUTH CARE IN THE RESIDENTIAL SETTING
This specialty course will assist students in developing and honing their skills for work in the residential setting – group home, foster home, etc. Focus will be placed on guiding the student to develop competency based approaches that will be used to work with children, youth and their families who are experiencing out of home care situations. Up-to-date coverage will be provided by experts in each area.

YOUTH, DRUGS AND MENTAL HEALTH
This course will provide students with information regarding drug use and abuse in the youth population. Special emphasis will be placed on assisting students to develop an understanding of such topics as risk factors and protective factors for youth drug/use and abuse, models of assisting youth (stages of change model, harm reduction model, abstinence model, motivational interviewing, etc), the links between mental health issues and drug use/abuse, and the core functions of a substance abuse counselor.

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT I
The student who meets all designated requirements will be placed in a field placement for an eight-week period. The purpose of this applied course is to assist the student to integrate theory and practice through a supervised experience with a designated population.

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT II
The student who meets all designated requirements will be placed in a field placement for a twelve-week period. The purpose of this applied course is to assist the student to integrate theory and practice through a supervised experience with a designated population. When possible, this placement will be in a different location than CYC-400, Field Work I.

Course Descriptions

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
This course gives students an understanding of the early childhood education field. Aspects of children, families, play, environments, facilitator, partnerships, and quality will be examined in detail. Program variety, issues in the field, and child care regulations will also be discussed, giving students a general overview of what is required to work in this specialized field.

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS
This course will introduce students to the principles and practices of the human relationships. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and skill development as they begin to recognize the process of human interaction. Giving and receiving feedback, assertiveness, self-esteem, and conflict resolution are among the topics covered. Focus will be placed on self-exploration and experiential learning.

ART & CREATIVITY
During this course, students will explore their own creative and expressive abilities in order to relate, and develop opportunities for children to express theirs. A definition of creativity, various mediums and modes of expression, and the value of artistic display will be examined in detail.

INFANTS & TODDLERS
Working with infants and toddlers requires a specialized skill set, which will be introduced in this course of study. From birth to age two is a time of rapid development, and consistent care, observation, and responsiveness to their needs is required to ensure the foundation is set for all future learning. The many milestones that are reached during the first two years will be examined, and students will learn how to plan programming appropriate to support children in all areas of development.

HEALTH
Healthy practices are essential in the early childhood field, and during this course, students will learn what health-promotion is, how to do self-care while working in a demanding profession, and ways to prevent and manage illness. The many safety concerns involving young children will be discussed, including childhood injuries, prevention of abuse, and environmental dangers. Eating habits and food preparation will also be studied, giving students the opportunity to learn how to ensure proper nutrition for children of all ages.

PRESCHOOLERS
The preschool years are a time of extreme creativity. The value of supporting and encouraging play, strategies for enhancing children’s self-expression, and the ways to ensure an appropriate early childhood education experience for 2 to 5 year olds will be studied. Students will have the opportunity to plan programming, organize the environment, and design interest centers, which are essential skills in working with -preschool children.

CHILD GUIDANCE
This course allows students to gain an understanding of guiding young children to choose appropriate behaviours for themselves, while using natural consequences and reasonable expectations to lead them toward greater self-control. Prevention of unacceptable behaviour, reinforcement of prosocial behaviour, and methods of assisting children in attaining self-discipline will be examined. The impact of caregiving styles, direct, and indirect discipline strategies, and classroom management will give students an appreciation of the role they play in appropriate guidance of young children.

SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN
School-age children are at a unique period of development, struggling to gain independence, while maintaining the security of still being a child. Students will study the developmental issues that are unfolding, while learning to program plan, support, and care for the varying ages and stages inherent in this diverse group.

OBSERVATION & ASSESSMENT
Observation and assessment are critical skills when working with young children. Caregivers must practice systematic, objective observation of the children in their care to ensure programming and activities meet all individual needs. Students will gain an understanding of the importance of observation and assessment, what methods of observation can be used, and how to use the data obtained in order to accurately assess a child’s needs.

CHILDREN, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY
Children are a product of their family and community, and it is essential for caregivers to offer support to the child, as well as parents in their role of primary caregivers. Students will gain an understanding of the diverse family constellations, as well as the characteristics of dysfunctional families and the variables that can put children at risk. When forming a partnership, students will learn to respect the needs of families, and how best to communicate with and involve families. The community supports and resources available will also be examined.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT
Upon completion of this course, the student will have an overall view of the study of human development, learning about the transition from conception to birth, and the many milestones that cross the life span until adolescence. Physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development will be examined, giving students an understanding of the factors that influence each, and an appreciation of the importance of early foundational support.

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to offer children with special needs the best possible chance for holistic development in a normal living environment. In cooperation with parents and professionals, they will be able to develop, apply and evaluate integrated program plans that will stimulate the children to achieve their development potential and attain the objectives as part of the inclusion process.

BUSINESS OF A CHILD CARE CENTRE
This course is designed to make the student aware of the business and legal requirements for starting a childcare as a business. The students learn the legal steps in incorporating a company in New Brunswick and registering a business name. Students study the provincial regulations for childcare setup and operation. Sources of funding for business start-ups are presented to the students and each student prepares a business plan to support an application for a business loan.

ADMINISTRATION OF CHILD CARE CENTRE
Upon completion of this course, students will have a greater understanding of the administrative practices that are necessary for a successful childcare operation. The many roles and responsibilities of directors will be discussed, allowing students to better grasp the position and its function. The role of advocacy and professional practice will also be reviewed, giving students the knowledge necessary to lobby for change in a vital field.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Students gain competence in Microsoft Word and Microsoft Office software. They learn to use Word, Excel, Power Point, Access and Outlook. The students also learn to use e-mail to communicate productively. 

PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING
This course introduces the student to a wide variety of applied behavioural techniques used to modify behaviour. The course will assist the student in observing behaviour in an objective and analytical manner. Classical and operant conditioning theories and procedures will be emphasized in a practical manner. In addition, observational learning and cognitive-behavioural procedures will be explored. Effectiveness of treatment procedures and ethical issues will be discussed throughout the course.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT& ACCOUNTABILITY
This course will give students a background in professional conduct in early childhood and allow them to develop the skills necessary to be accountable in their chosen profession. They will have the opportunity to discuss industry standards, ethics, advocacy, and develop a professional portfolio, allowing them to enter the field prepared for the important role they will play.

NEW BRUNSWICK CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK FOR EARLY LEARNING AND CHILD CARE
Students will be trained in the curriculum that has been developed for use in all child care centres in New Brunswick. The four goals for early learning and care will be explored, and the implementation of programming to achieve these goals will be introduced. It is a child-focused approach that allows the teacher to provide the support and encouragement for the child’s attainment of their own knowledge in an environment that is diverse, flexible, and inclusive.

EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANTS FUNDAMENTALS
This course will give students the knowledge and skills for working within the school setting as an Educational Assistant. It will focus on the role of an EA, strategies for within the school environment, and an overview of possible expectations in this varied position.

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT
Students will have the opportunity to put their theoretical knowledge into practical use during their field placement. With appropriate supervision and guidance, they will manage the daily activities of an educator, EA, or other professional in this field, and will take on the duties and responsibilities that come with the position, giving them an accurate understanding and appreciation of their chosen career.

Course Descriptions

FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN SERVICES
Students will explore the foundation of generalist human service work practice. Through an interactive class students will discuss the profession’s historical roots, examine essential components of sound practice, and problem solving processes and review best practices. Students will explore interdisciplinary approaches and discuss ethical dilemmas.

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS
This course will introduce students to the principles and practices of the human relationship. Students will have opportunity to integrate theory and skills development as they begin to recognize the process of human interaction. Giving and receiving feedback, needs, assertiveness, self-esteem and conflict resolution are emphasized as important influences on interpersonal communication skills. Students will learn to develop collaborative and positive relationships. Focus will be placed on self-exploration and experiential learning.

LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT
This course will explore lifespan development (birth to death). Students will develop an understanding of social, emotional, physical, moral, and cognitive growth exploring widely accepted theories. Students will apply these theories to an observational learning experience.

SELF CARE
Students will have the opportunity to explore and examine areas of personal stress and their maintaining variables. Traditional and holistic methods of self-care will be examined in this applied course.

THE LEGAL SIDE OF HUMAN SERVICES
This course gives students a foundation of knowledge of the Canadian legal system necessary for them to properly advocate and support their future clients. Students will learn special considerations in human rights, consent and capacity, mental illness, and youth criminal justice. Students will also explore various provincial acts that apply to the field, observe court proceedings, and hear from several guest speakers.

FUNDAMENTAL SKILLS IN INTERVIEWING
This course emphasizes the necessary skills to begin any helping relationship. Basic helping skills will be examined and practiced – active listening, reflecting, leading, challenging, paraphrasing, summarizing, etc. – through lectures, class discussions and role play demonstrations.

COMMUNICATIONS
Through an interactive classroom environment the student will gain the basic skills and techniques necessary to communicate appropriately with staff, clients, families and other human services care providers. Focus will also be given to the importance of proper documentation and reporting. Students will learn basic computer software skills and will be participate in career planning sessions that focus on developing employability skills. Students will learn to prepare resumes and cover letters, they will be given interviewing strategies and will learn skills that will help them search and secure employment in their field. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, and journals, role playing and guest speakers.

THE FAMILY-SYSTEM, ISSUES, AND HELPING
This course will examine the family system; its communication patterns, rules, and life cycle. Students will have the opportunity to review historical and current practices through a literature review and instructor led lectures. Students will also be introduced to the process of assessment, engagement, empowerment and discharge as it relates to working with at-risk families. Students will gain skills for working with families, as well as facilitating skill development in families. Students will examine their own family system as well as gain the skills required to work effectively with traditional and non-traditional family structures.

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
Students will study the procedure and DSM-V criteria associated with being diagnosed with mental health illnesses. Areas to be explored include, but are not limited to, Bipolar Disorder, Mood Disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Anxiety Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Schizophrenia. Students will learn the symptoms and behaviours associated with the above mental illnesses, through case studies, videos, and a variety of instructor led demonstrations. Students will explore and research prevention and treatments including psychotherapy, group therapy, psychoeducational therapy, and psychopharmacological treatments.

BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT
This course introduces the student to a wide variety of applied behavioral techniques used to modify behavior. The course will assist the student in observing behavior in an objective and analytical manner. Classical and operant conditioning theories and procedures will be emphasized in a practical manner and implemented through case studies.

GROUP DYNAMICS AND THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY PLANNING
This course provides opportunities for the student to utilize the skills and techniques of the group process in social and work situations. The focus is on group behavior in therapeutic settings and the use of various techniques, methods and approaches within the group process with children, youth and their families. Students will apply this theoretical knowledge to a group therapeutic activity planning project.

ABUSE
This course will educate students on the different forms of abuse inflicted against children, adults, elders and vulnerable persons. Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of many types of abuse, such as: neglect and psychological, physical, sexual, and economic abuse. Students will learn how to identify signs of abuse and what to do if they suspect abuse. Risk factors and prevention will also be covered in respect to victims and perpetrators.

RESIDENTIAL
This course is designed to increase students’ knowledge and skills in the area of residential placements of adults, seniors and vulnerable persons. It will focus on competency based program design and implementation as best practice qualities are explored and discussed. Topics will include, but are not limited to, the role of collaborative problem solving, structure, consistency, individualized programming, staff team work, and quality care. Students will apply the concepts learned in class to a variety of case study examples.

CRISIS INTERVENTION I and II
These courses will provide students with theoretical knowledge and practical skills for managing crisis situations. Based on the premise that “Crisis is Opportunity”, Crisis Intervention I teaches students introductory intervention methods and safe practices through activities, self reflection, and script writing. Certifications include Nonviolent Crisis Intervention and Suicide Intervention. In Crisis Intervention II, Students develop a deeper understanding of crisis intervention and focus primarily on learning more advanced techniques required to implement the stages of Life Space Crisis Intervention.

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT
This hands-on course uses theoretical knowledge developed in earlier courses to develop and facilitate both recreational and therapeutic program planning based on individuals’ goals. Students also learn how to develop a thorough task analysis in order to assist clients in reaching their goals. Students will learn all aspects of program planning and develop superior skills in group and individual facilitation.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT
This course will provide students with information regarding substance use and abuse. Special emphasis will be placed on assisting students to develop an understanding of such topics as risk factors and protective factors for drug use/abuse, models of assisting (stages of change model, harm reduction model, abstinence model, motivational interviewing, etc.), the links between mental health issues and drug use/abuse and the core functions of a substance abuse counselor.

HUMAN SERVICES IN THE COMMUNITY
This course develops a strong understanding of exceptionalities and disabilities and ways in which students can support their clients in integrating positively into the community by adopting the philosophies of Social Role Valorization. Students will also gain practical experience identifying appropriate support services and intervention strategies available within the community through guest speakers, community visits, volunteer experiences and research. Students also develop an understanding of the relationships between families, community agencies and support service professionals by learning about current Canadian policies and programs.

MENTAL HEALTH
Students will study issues relating to individuals diagnosed with mild to chronic and short and long term mental health illnesses and the challenges and barriers associated with the illness. Areas to be explored include but are not limited to ADD/ADHD, Anxiety Disorder, Downs Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Schizophrenia. Students will explore treatments which include medications, natural alternatives, behaviour modification and other related interventions.

INDEPENDENT DIRECTED SEMINAR
Students will participate in an individual project which is designed for the purpose of an in-depth study of a preapproved topic within the field. Students will be provided a framework for the work required with specific deliverables due throughout the course. Students will be required to submit a written report and as well, will be required to create a workshop related to the field of study. Instructors will support students by providing an appropriate audience for the presentations.

CAREER READINESS
Students will learn basic computer software skills and will participate in career planning sessions that focus on developing employability skills. Students will learn to prepare resumes and cover letters, they will be given interviewing strategies and will learn skills that will help them search and secure employment in their field. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, journals, role playing and guest speakers.

PRACTICUM I
Students will be placed in an on the job training site for the purposes of observation. The students will be assigned placements and will observe specific aspects of the program. Daily record keeping will be a requirement where students will be writing responsive journals. They will be required to record details of the observation and will then be required to either evaluate in terms of effectiveness of actions carried out, to classify actions or behaviours, to develop a plan to support, or to reflect on the situation.

PRACTICUM II
Students who meet all of the designated requirements will be placed in a second on the job training site for 12 weeks where they will participate fully in the operations of the host. Successful completion of the practicum is a requirement of graduation.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS

Students will practice and develop verbal skills to effectively control difficult people and situations while learning to respond rather than react to a situation. The course teaches students accurate note taking skills while reinforcing the importance of notes for court purposes. Students will discuss such topics as communications, process and effective communication as it relates to verbal and non-verbal communication. Students will also explore the impact of stereotyping, prejudice and culture on communication.

BOOT CAMP

This is a physical aspect of the program that is held for the first four weeks of the program. Students are involved in a series of physical activities that are designed to build individual levels of fitness and endurance. As well the cadet will learn the core values necessary to succeed in law enforcement: uniform and department, regulation and obligations, and inspection and drill.

PHYSICAL ABILITIES REQUIREMENT EVALUATION (P.A.R.E.)

Students are required to pass the P.A.R.E. test of fitness in order to receive their diploma.

FITNESS AND LIFESTYLE

This course is a combination of classroom and practical work. Students will learn to manage their personal lifestyle through explaining aspects of health and wellness. They will be introduced to Canada’s Food Guide and making good food choices, goal setting and time management, self-esteem, attitude and intentions and their role in participation in physical activity. As well, students will participate in an active physical program as they acquire the physical competencies needed to meet the requirements of the profession.

DEFENSE TACTICS AND OFFICE SAFETY

The students will learn defensive tactics, control techniques, tackle downs and come along holds used by Police and Corrections officers. Pressure point systems and different methods of restraints will be introduced. Topics covered include: officer safety, handcuffing techniques, searching techniques, martial arts training techniques, incident management intervention models, compliance tools and collapsible baton training.

POLICING OPERATIONS

Students will be introduced to police/security duties and responsibilities and will participate in scenarios where they apply learned techniques.Students will learn crime scene protection skills, evidence gathering and note taking.

COMMUNITY POLICING

Students will be introduced to the philosophy of Community Policing and the value of creating partnerships in the community as important aspects in the policing sector. Students will be exposed to the culture and make-up of the local community area while becoming an integral member of the police community relationship/partnership process. Oulton cadets volunteer at chosen community events for a total of 20 hours during the year.

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS

During this course students will be introduced to investigative procedures. They will learn the methodology and techniques of observation as they are introduced to crime scene investigation, first officer on the scene, crime scene management, fingerprinting, interview, interrogation, investigations, and law scenarios.

LAW

The student is introduced to the Criminal Justice System in Canada. The course examines major theories related to the study of crime and various consequences received by offenders. Topics covered include but are not limited to the Criminal Code, Federal Statues, Provincial Statutes, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom, Youth Criminal Justice Act, Canadian Evidence Act, Use of Force Law, Powers of Arrest, Search and Seizure, Warrants, Driving Offenses, Sexual Offenses, Corrections and Conditional Release Act.

ETHICS

Students shall practice ethical decision making during this course. They will gain knowledge and insight to several “code of conducts” and the expectations of their actions in the field. They will explore the importance of ethics and distinguish ethics from law and religion. Students will define various types of responses to ethical situations. Emphasis will be placed on requirements concerning confidentiality in police, corrections and security work. Students will explore aspects of professionalism and its value in the profession.

CORRECTIONAL OPERATIONS

Students will be introduced to the knowledge and skills to maintain security in an institutional setting. The student will acquire knowledge in: key control, inmate movement, internal and external escort, searching, and seizure on contraband, counts, radio procedure, report writing, perimeter security, and situational management model. The student will also learn: problem solving, the CAPRA model of decision making, crisis intervention, effective listening skills, observation techniques, management of emergency situations, hostage taking and forcible confinement, defusing crisis situation, suicide awareness workshop, self-injurious behaviour and report writing. 

CANADIAN CORRECTIONS

This course will provide the student an overview of Corrections in Canada by examining various Correctional systems, both federal and provincial. Students will explore corrections and criminal justice systems and community correction. They will cover types of institutions, roles and responsibilities clarification and risk assessment of offenders.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

Students gain competence in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office software. They lear to use Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access and Outlook. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively.

PSYCHOLOGY OF POLICING AND CORRECTIONS

This course will provide the student insight into the study of crime and criminal behaviour while focusing on the various crimes. The course highlights factors that contribute to law enforcement as well as psychological factors that officers face on a daily basis. Students will identify and discuss a variety of psychological disorders and factors that may cause violence and aggression. They will learn effective interviewing techniques and recognize crime partners.

SOCIOLOGY

This course explores the ever changing laws that govern Canada while focusing on bas knowledge and skills for entry in policing, corrections and general security. The emphasis in this program is in the law, its application and techniques. Students will recognize potential problem areas and the means to control situations. It also prepares students to face the criminal aspect of the social deviances in our community and inside institutions.

PRACTICUM

Students will participate in a mandatory Practicum in order to gain first-hand experience and to practice skills and techniques learned.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS AND ETHICS

This module will provide the students with knowledge of ethics and law in dentistry and the dental assisting profession. The class will consist of instruction and practical role playing experiences that will allow the student to implement their communication skills in the dental office and with the public.

COMMUNICATIONS AND DENTAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

Students will gain an understanding of the roles of a receptionist and how to communicate effectively. Understanding the psychology of a patient, the proper maintenance of a patient file, accounts payable/receivable, payroll and insurance form procedures and processing will be taught. Basic banking procedures commonly used will also be covered.

MICROBIOLOGY

Oral microbiology will focus on the study of microorganisms existing in the oral cavity. Knowledge of microbiology and the role of infectious diseases in the dental office will be covered.

INTRO TO CLINIC

The students will complete the theory required to be able to confidently practice in a clinical setting. Sterilization, disinfection and orientation to the office and clinical set up will be taught and reinforced through clinical experience.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will include an orientation to the structures of the human body and the functions within them. Topics covered: parts of the cell to the major body systems and how they work together.

DENTAL SCIENCES

This course will educate the students in dental sciences including embryology, landmarks of the oral cavity and components of the dentition. Applying the information to a clinic setting by demonstrating the ability to complete a patient record will be achieved.

DENTAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will educate the students in dental health, allowing them to recognize, explain, and demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques to their patients. The skills required to perform preventative dental assisting tasks will be demonstrated in a clinic setting as students practice on a typodont, each other and graduate to patient care. This course also covers basic nutrition theory that will allow the student to be able to discuss the relationship between diet and good dental health with their patients. Community dental health projects will be prepared and delivered throughout the year.

PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

A dental assistant student will gain the understanding of objectives related to the classification of drugs, how they affect dental procedures and how to use drug reference material, including understanding prescriptions. The knowledge and understanding of medical emergencies and how to assist during one of these emergencies is key to a dental practice.

RADIOLOGY

Basic principles of physics and radiography will be covered, ensuring that the student understands the importance of radiology and the safety precautions required to operate a dental X-ray unit. Techniques will be taught in class and practical experience will be gained later in the program.

RESTORATIVE

Chair side intra-oral procedures and processes will be detailed in a classroom setting, demonstrated evaluated in the clinic. The student will learn to recognize and understand the procedures, instruments and materials used to complete common restorative appointments.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY/ORAL PATHOLOGY

This course will provide the student with a detailed description of the head and neck region including theory as it relates to the bones, muscles, nerves, and blood supply. This course will also present the student with material on diseases of the oral cavity and diagnostic information that a dentist would use to determine pathologies. The course consists of classroom material enhanced with a series of instructor handouts and visual materials.

DENTAL SPECIALTIES

This module is comprised of a series of seminars derived from dental specialties. Information will be delivered as it relates to the practice of a dental assistant in any specialty office. The course is supported by a series of guest speakers and office rotations.

DENTAL RECORDS

Tooth morphology and proper charting will be covered during this module. A clinical chart will be discussed in depth including details on obtaining information and being able to complete a chart in detail. Students will learn how to complete a chart and to understand the importance of being able to communicate the information to the patient.

LABORATORY PROCEDURES

Taking place in a lab setting, combined with classroom instruction, students will learn the methods of lab procedures such as taking impressions, pouring and trimming models and preparing custom trays.

PATIENT CARE CLINIC

This module will provide the student with the opportunity to learn hands on and be evaluated on all aspects of clinical dental assisting. The complete process of client care will be brought together in a “real” clinic setting as the student schedules patients to be treated in a supervised patient clinic.

RADIOLOGY LAB

The student will practice radiology techniques on a typodont, including safety, exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs.

PRACTICUM

Five weeks of supervised practical clinical experience will be achieved. Student’s time will be spent in a general dentistry practice and have hands-on practice.

Course Descriptions

PRECLINICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of dental hygiene care. Fundamentals of safe dental hygiene practice and instrumentation skills are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students’ development of the skills defined within the dental hygiene scope of practice. Skills are practiced first on manikins and later on classmates in treatment simulation sessions.

ORAL ANATOMY AND ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES
This theory course covers the recognition of the basic structures and tissues of the oral cavity in health. Emphasis is placed on procedures required to do oral assessments of clients and record findings using accepted clinical symbols according to professional practice standards.

DENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION I AND II
This theory course teaches communication techniques to facilitate management of clients in the clinical setting and to foster clients’ learning of self care practices related to general and oral health. The role of nutrition in maintenance of optimal health is discussed. As students progress to the next levels of health promotion they will discusses the physical, intellectual, and socio-economic factors which influence clients’ decisions and actions in maintaining their oral health and accessing oral health care. Emphasis is placed on individualizing oral self care messages for clients across the lifespan. Nutrition and how it relates to total client care is the focus in HYG-204.

RADIOGRAPHY I AND II
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the history, development and use of radiation in the diagnosis of dental disease. The principles of proper exposure, processing, handling and storage of dental diagnostic radiographs are covered. Radiation hygiene required to protect client and operator from hazardous exposure levels is emphasized. The laboratory portion of the course allows students to refine exposure techniques for standard intraoral views using manikins. Bisecting angle, paralleling and occlusal plane techniques are studied. Clinical simulations with classmates and exposures for clients are also part of the laboratory requirements.

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology pertinent to the dental hygienists’ role in overall health assessment of clients prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and on-going oral care.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology of the head and neck pertinent to the dental hygienists roll in the overall health assessment prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and ongoing oral care.

CLINICAL PRACTICE
During this series of clinical courses students will provide education and clinical treatment interventions to clients who require simple to complex protocols for maintenance of oral health.

THEORY OF DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE
This theory course supports clinical practice by discussing the elements of the dental hygiene process of care and how to apply it in the assessment, planning and delivery of oral care services to clients. Portions of class time are used to discuss issues related to clinical procedures, progress and performance expectations as students gain greater expertise in clinical skills.

HEALTH STATUS ASSESSMENT
This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and discusses the basic drug groups and their uses. The relationship of drug therapies for systemic illness to the implications for planning and delivery of oral care for clients is emphasized.

ORAL HISTOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY
This theory course introduces students to the study of oral tissues in health and disease at the cellular level. Emphasis is on the process of disease and the body’s natural defense mechanisms to counter damage.

PERIODONTICS
This course examines, in detail, the structures and tissues of the periodontium in health and progressing to states of disease. The factors that initiate and sustain periodontal disease are studied and interventions designed to maintain periodontal health are emphasized. The role of the dental hygienist as a primary health care provider in implementing evidence-based therapies to halt the disease process and assist in regaining and maintaining periodontal health is emphasized. During this course students will explore advanced techniques for treatment of periodontal disease and surgical correction of defects resulting from disease. Emphasis is placed on the collaborative role of the dental hygienist.

DENTAL MATERIALS AND LABORATORY PROCEDURES
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the characteristics of dental materials. The properties, proper manipulation and storage of common materials used in dentistry are studied. The laboratory sessions allow students to manipulate materials and create products related to dental diagnosis and treatment.

COMMUNICATION
This course emphasizes the importance of imparting or recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. The principles of doing academic research to prepare an oral report or to write a paper are studied and implemented. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letters, analytical reports etc.). The student will develop the skill to access relevant and credible resources in order to research a topic of interest to the field of dental hygiene.

DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE STANDARDS
This course introduces students to the ethical and legal responsibilities of dental hygiene practice. Discussion centers around the use of pertinent New Brunswick provincial health regulation legislation, Professional Practice Standards and the Dental Hygiene Code of Ethics as quality control mechanisms to protect the public from receiving substandard care are covered. Remedies available to clients harmed by practitioners are studied. The principles and procedures of employment search will be addressed. Students will learn how to write an effective resume. Strategies for making follow-up contacts with prospective employers and preparing for a job interview will be emphasized.

CLINIC FEEDBACK
During this weekly session students are encouraged to bring topics for discussion from activities and situations which arise during clinical practice. This course provides a regular forum for transfer of pertinent information among students and faculty regarding clinical practice.

COMMUNITY HEALTH
This course introduces the concept of health as applied to groups or populations. The application of the dental hygiene process of care to assess group needs and plan appropriate educational/treatment strategies is discussed. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of statistics as used to assess needs in groups or populations and their use in program planning.

SOCIAL SCIENCE
This course explores human psychological and social development over the life span. Emphasis is placed on the influence of perception, knowledge, needs and motivation on behavior. Students study the mechanisms of behavior in the dental environment and how client behavior can be modified towards habits that foster improved oral health.

ORAL PATHOLOGY
This course concentrates on the oral manifestations of systemic disease and the implications for dental hygiene interventions. Specialized radiographic and laboratory techniques used in diagnosis of oral diseases are discussed. Recognition of the indications of common diseases from diagnostic images is stressed.

PERIODONTICS II
This course is a continuation of Periodontics I (HYG 207). Students learn detailed characteristics of the structures and tissues of the periodontium as periodontal disease continues to create more advanced tissue destruction. Examination of surgical and non surgical phases of periodontal therapy and post operative periodontal health maintenance are emphasized. Treatment modalities are investigated using systematic reviews and position papers from the American Academy of Periodontology. The implications and dental hygiene care of dental implants are examined.

CLINICAL SEMINARS
The implications of medically compromised patients will be examined in relationship to oral manifestations, prevention of problems, and treatment modifications. Discussion of client case studies will expand the students’ understanding of the dental hygiene process of care and provide students with comprehensive information on the clinical management of clients, especially those with special needs, in the planning and delivery of oral care.

BIOSTATISTICS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY
Students learn basic biostatistics and how they are used to make decisions regarding delivery of publicly funded dental services to the community. The use of experimental and non-experimental research designs and statistical analyses in determining community needs, designing programs and evaluating the success of intervention strategies is addressed. Students also learn to read, understand and assess the quality of published research and the importance of this in life-long learning as a practicing professional.

COMMUNICATIONS II
Students learn how communication with peers and health care professionals differs from that with other groups. This course concentrates on completion of secondary research techniques: written and oral presentation of findings designed for peer/professional audiences.

COMMUNITY HEALTH PLACEMENTS
Field placement activities are designed to familiarize students with the realities of dental hygiene practice in specialty settings. Students will prepare for and complete assignments in designated specialties.

ORTHODONTICS THEORY AND LABORATORY
The theory portion of this course discusses the principles of assessment data collection for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Commonly used appliance systems are examined and basics of orthodontic biomechanics and tissue responses to tooth movement are studied. During the laboratory component students practice orthodontic skills on manikins and partners (limited) in simulated clinical exercises.

Course Descriptions

PRECLINICAL THEORY and PRACTICE for LONG TERM CARE and COMMUNITY PRACTICE
This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of care. Fundamentals of safe practice and instrumentation skills for long term care and community practise are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students ‘development of the skills defined within the scope of practice. Skills are practiced first on manikins and later on classmates in treatment simulation sessions. Topics such as WHMISS and infection control are addressed.

COMMUNICATIONS I
This course emphasizes the importance of imparting or recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letter and reports). Ethics and the roles of regulatory bodies in health care will be explored.

HEALTH PROMOTION I : HEALTHY LIVING and NUTRITION
This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living and the communication techniques to facilitate management of clients in the clinical setting and foster a clients learning of self-care practices related to total patient health. Students progress with their knowledge of health as they discuss the physical, intellectual, and socio-economic factors which influence clients’ decisions and actions in maintaining their health and accessing health care. Emphasis is placed on individualizing self care messages for clients across the lifespan. A component of this course will cover food handling and preparation.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This theory course discusses human anatomy and physiology, connections between body systems and the terminology to support it.

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
This theory discusses the principles of growth and development across the life cycle. Students will gain an understanding that a client needs change as the client progresses through this life cycle.

CLINICAL PRACTICE-LONG TERM CARE
Students will apply personal care skills in a long term care setting. (2 week placement)

CLINICAL PRACTICE-COMMUNITY
Students will apply skills learned in the lab setting, in the community. (1 week placement)

PRECLINICAL PRACTICE AND THEORY FOR ACUTE CARE
This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of care. Fundamentals of safe practice and instrumentation skills for acute care practice are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students development of the skills defined within the scope of practice. Such topics as hospital protocols, isolation techniques and sterilization processing will be discussed.

PALLIATIVE CARE
Students will explore the concepts of palliation within the support workers scope of practice, examining topics such as client and family needs, spirituality, culture, loss, grief and caregiver support. Included in this course is Palliative Care for Front Line Workers certificate offered through Cancer Care NS.

COMMUNICATIONS ll
A continuation of HCSW 103, this course will prepare students with more advanced communications skills including multicultural considerations; ethics, stress management and practical knowledge for inter professional communication.

THEORY OF HEALTH CARE SUPPORT IN MENTAL HEALTH
Students will gain an understanding of the role of health care support teams to specific to the needs of patients and residents experiencing mental health illness. Diseases and disorders in mental health, including those found in aging population will be explored. Included will be Non-violent Crisis Intervention and Alzheimer’s disease and Other Dementia’s Care Course.

DISEASE AND DISORDERS
This course will introduce human diseases and the fundamentals of homeostatic mechanisms. Mechanisms of disease how alterations affect healthy structure and function will be illustrated through exploring common disease states. Disease and illness will be discussed.

DISABILITIES ACROSS LIFE SPAN
This course will introduce developmental and intellectual disabilities across the human life span. Health Care Support Worker’s roles and responsibilities will be discussed; Adaptive clothing, adaptive devices and special needs will be explored.

MEDICATION AWARENESS
Students will be introduced to their role in medication awareness across the continuum, of care. Common medication terminology, labels, Over-the-Counter and prescription medications will be discussed.

COMMUNITY PLACEMENTS
This is the second of the community placements where students will apply all skills pertaining to home management.

ACUTE CARE PLACEMENTS
Field placements activities are designed to familiarize students will the realities of the acute care setting. Students will be placed in acute areas of practice for 40 hours during the semester.

PRACTICUM
Students will be placed in off-site setting for 4 weeks as they become integrated in a real life setting and practice the summative nature of the day to day work of a support worker. Students may choose any field of study for the placement (long term, acute).

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.
 

Course Descriptions

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This course introduces the sciences of anatomy and physiology and the basic structure, functions and assessment of the human body in its state of wellness. Integration of systems and maintenance of homeostasis within the body will also be discussed.

COMMUNICATIONS AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS
Through an interactive classroom environment the student will gain the basic skills and techniques necessary to communicate appropriately with staff, clients, families and other health care providers. Focus will also be given to the importance of proper documentation and reporting. Also, attention to nursing theories that pertain to communication and basic needs all humans require will be examined. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, and journals, role playing and guest speakers.

PRE-CLINCAL THEORY
Through an interactive classroom setting students will gain knowledge of theory related to the Canadian Health Care System and the foundation of nursing to appropriately deliver care. Students will know and practice the principles behind the skills that will be delivered at the bedside. As well, students will be able to use and understand the terminology used in nursing.

BEGINNING NURSING SKILLS LAB
Upon completion of this course the student will be able to perform basic nursing skills that are commonly required in the care of patients. These skills are required in acute, long term and community settings. In addition to classroom theory, the student will have an opportunity to practice and perform skills in the simulation lab. The student must be successful in both the theory and all lab components of this course.

NUTRITION AND HEALTHY LIVING
This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living and the communication techniques needed to facilitate management of patients in the clinical setting. It also fosters patients’ learning of self care practices and how these relate to total patient health. Students will also be able to identify and explain the relationship between nutrition and diabetes and describe the effects of this disease due to poor nutrition.

ADULT PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT I
This course will provide the student with the opportunity to develop health assessment skills and techniques required to properly obtain a full health assessment of a client. It includes an introduction to a health assessment, components of health interview and guidelines to performing a head-to-toe physical examination. It also encompasses a review of anatomy as it pertains to the physical examination. Emphasis will be placed on procedures required to do assessments of clients and record finding using accepted clinical symbols according to professional practice standards.

CLINICAL PRACTICE
During this series of clinical courses, students will provide care, education and interventions in practice. Clinics may be held on site or in a variety of agency/clinical settings. Clinics will be sequenced appropriately based on theory material covered. Clinical practice will be experienced in settings including, but not limited to: medical/surgical, maternal, geriatrics, pediatrics, mental health as well as a variety of community settings. *Although some clinic/lab sessions will be on site, students will be responsible for travel an costs associated with relocation, travel and other to access assigned clinical sites. Clinical rotations are scheduled throughout the program.

DISEASES OF THE HUMAN BODY
This course will introduce human diseases and the fundamentals of homeostatic mechanisms. Mechanisms of disease and how alterations to body systems affect healthy structure and function will be illustrated through exploring common disease states.

COMMUNICATING THROUGH CHARTNG AND DOCUMENTATION
This course emphasizes the importance of imparting and recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. The principles of doing academic research to prepare an oral report or to write a paper are studied and implemented. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letter and reports). The student will develop the skill to access relevant and creditable resources in order to research topics of interest to LPN’s.

ADVANCED PRE-CLINICAL THEORY
This course will be a continuation from semester one focusing on those skills that are more in depth and require a greater skill and knowledge level. Students will learn and practice the principles behind the skills that will be delivered at the bedside.

INTERMEDIATE NURSING SKILLS LAB
The lab experience will continue to be a time for students to integrate their knowledge and skills in providing simulated nursing care to fellow students and simulation equipment. The level of care the student will be able to provide will be of a higher level and their critical thinking will be tested with each scenario given.

SPECIALTY PRACTICE BASED HEALTH CARE I
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the process of care that is brought to the bedside while caring for those clients who are either brand new to life, suffering with life threatening illness or perhaps in the last stages of the dying process.

ADULT PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT II
A continuation of LPN 106, this course will prepare the student with more advanced interview skills as well as introduce assessment of the more involved client. Such things as history taking and interviewing for motor skills and physical and social abilities will be explored.

INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY
This course introduces the principles of Pharmacology and the basic drug groups and uses. Proper terminology and the familiarization of their uses in planning and delivery of care will be discussed.

SAFETY AT WORK

  • Non-Violent Crisis Intervention 
  • WHIMIS
  • CPR
  • First Aid

PHELBOTOMY
The course will provide the LPN student with a theoretical and working knowledge of specimen collection techniques. The topics covered in this course include: anatomy of the human blood circulation system, safety in phlebotomy, phlebotomy equipment, phlebotomy procedures, specimen consideration and special procedures.

SPECIALITY PRACTICE BASED HEALTH CARE II
This course will build upon assessment techniques learned as they apply to varied populations and settings. Students will learn the specific knowledge required to practise in aging populations, surgery and oncology. Differences in practise within the spectrum of settings for care will be explored.

LEADERSHIP/PROFESSIONALISM
During this course the student will learn the importance of a professional reputation and the importance of establishing this in their workplace every day. They will recognize how professionals view their work, how they think, act and treat others. Practical Nurses are currently in these roles having earned the respect and reputation.

COMMUNITY HEALTH
Concepts of health as applied to groups and populations are explored and applied using the nursing model of care as students develop community health knowledge and apply it is a series of community programming formats. Field placement activities are designed to familiarize students with the realities of practice in specialty settings. Students will prepare for and complete assignments in designated specialties.

PRACTICE STANDARDS FOR HEALTH CARE IN CANADA
This course introduces the ethical and legal responsibilities of nursing practise. Discussion centers on provincial and national regulations. Students will learn the code of ethics, quality controls and protection of the public.

MEDICATION/IV INITIATION
This course teaches in a simulated setting the basic concepts of pharmacological theory and the skills necessary to safely administer medications through oral, rectal and injectable sites. Also, the student will learn the proper administration techniques of IV initiation and its responsibilities and legal implications.

MENTAL HEALTH
This course explores human psychological and social development over the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on the influence of perception, knowledge, environment, needs and motivation of behaviour. The primary focus on the course is placed on applying this knowledge to understanding and working with individuals in mentally compromised states.

CLINIC FEEDBACK
During weekly sessions students will bring topics for discussion to class from clinical/ community activities to share learning with classmates and faculty. This will also be a forum for discussing pertinent issues related to patient care, process and placements that are important to address with faculty. Portions of this class will be used to discuss issues related to procedures, practice, progression and performance expectations as students gain more knowledge.

NURSING PROCESS OF CARE
This course will focus on the process of care that the students will initiate in order to bring patients back to optimal wellness. They will learn to prepare, carry out and assess whether the plan best meets the patients holistic needs.

APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS
Students learn how communication with peers and health care professionals differs from that with other groups. This course concentrates on completion of secondary research techniques: written and oral presentation of findings designed for peer/professional audiences. Basic biostatics will be taught in order for students to undertake a simple research design and analysis of a health intervention. The principles and procedures of employment search will be addressed. Students will learn how to write an effective resumé. Emphasis will be placed on strategies for making follow-up contacts with prospective employers and job interview preparation skills.

PRACTICUM
Students will be placed in offsite settings for 4 weeks as they become integrated in a real life setting and practise the summative nature of the day to day work of a practical nurse. Students may be required to gain membership to the association in order to perform all duties required for completion of the program.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.
 

Course Descriptions

INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE
This module serves as a basic introduction to the field of Medical Laboratory Science. Topics covered include the following:

  • Laboratory disciplines
  • Quality Assessment
  • Professionalism
  • Client/Patient Services
  • Communication
  • Employment Strategies

 

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I / TERMINOLOGY
The student will be introduced to the different body systems, the structure and function of the major organs within each system and the pathophysiology of common diseases and conditions associated with each. The student will become familiar with clinical procedures, laboratory tests and abbreviations related to each system and other specialized areas of medicine.

SOFTWARE
Emphasis in this area is placed on giving the student knowledge in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office software, which is becoming the software of choice for most of today’s offices. Using Microsoft’s latest office software Office 2007, the student becomes familiar with Word and Excel. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively and the Internet as an effective research tool.

LABORATORY MATHEMATICS
Students will learn the basic mathematics used in a medical laboratory environment including:

  • Mathematical essentials
  • Measurement systems and conversion procedures
  • Dilutions, solutions, and concentrations
  • Charts, tables, and graphs
  • Introductory statistics

BASIC LABORATORY PROCEDURES
This module will provide the medical laboratory assistant student with the knowledge of labware, basic laboratory instrumentation, reagent preparation and basic procedures in hematology and urinalysis, including the clinical practice.

INFECTIOUS CONTROL AND SAFETY
The student will review and develop a working knowledge of:

  • Standard precautions
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Utilization of safety devices
  • WHMIS
  • Spill containment and clean up procedures
  • Incident reporting
  • Occupational health and safety guidelines
  • Infection Control
  • Appropriate methods for disinfection and sterilization

KEYBOARDING
Keyboarding is a foundation skill required for effective computer usage. By use of a valuable all-in-one keyboarding program, the student will develop proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is placed on speed and accuracy.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
The student will continue to learn about the different body systems, the structure and function of the major organs within each system and the pathophysiology of common diseases and conditions associated with each. The student will become familiar with clinical procedures, laboratory tests and abbreviations related to each system and other specialized areas of medicine.

SPECIMEN PROCUREMENT
This course focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of specimen collection techniques. The topics covered in this module include:

  • Anatomy of the human blood circulation system
  • Preparation for specimen collection
  • Patient interaction
  • Specimen procurement procedures for venipuncture, capillary specimens and urine collections
  • Specimen identification
  • Specimen delivery

SPECIMEN PROCESSING
The student will develop a working knowledge of various pre and post analytical processes such as:

  • Specimen reception
  • Verification of specimen integrity
  • Pre analytic processes
  • Specimen dispatching
  • Specimen storage
  • Basic office procedures including telephone techniques, faxing, filing and time management

BASIC LABORATORY PROCEDURES II
This module, continued from MLA 105, will provide the medical laboratory assistant student with the knowledge and clinical practice of basic clinical chemistry and immunohematology.

INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY
The module introduces the student to basic microbiology and clinical procedures. The course includes the theoretical and practical aspects of:

  • Clinical procedures used for microbiological specimens
  • Culture media
  • Inoculation
  • Incubation
  • Microbiology staining procedures

INTRODUCTION TO HISTOLOGY AND CYTOLOGY
The student will acquire basic knowledge pertaining to histology and cytology techniques such as:

  • Specimen reception
  • Specimen fixation, grossing, decalcification, processing and embedding
  • Microtomy
  • Staining and coverslipping
  • Preparation of gynecologic and non-gynecologic cytology specimens

SELF DIRECTED STUDIES
This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. Time will be assigned during the schedule each week. The student does not receive a mark for this module.

PRACTICUM
The student who meets all the work term criteria (has successfully passed all course material) will be placed in a health care facility for a 6-week practicum session. Specific objectives in all aspects of program and national competencies must be met in order to complete this module. Successful completion is mandatory for graduation from the program.
 

Course Descriptions

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
Spelling, pronunciation and meanings of medical terminology are taught in this course. The identification of a medical word through structural analysis (prefixes, root words, and suffixes) also is taught. This course includes an overview of anatomy and physiology, which is learned while studying each body system. Simple, non-technical explanation of medical terms is incorporated with descriptions of anatomy, physiology, and pathology (no previous knowledge of biology is presumed or needed). The student becomes familiar with clinical procedures, laboratory tests, and abbreviations related to each body system and other specialized areas of medicine.

HOSPITAL PROCEDURES, PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDITECH
This course will introduce the student to the role of the Medical Administrator/Ward Clerk working in a hospital setting. Basic concepts of pharmacology will be taught and common classification of medications and their therapeutic usages. They will learn how to use drug reference material. The student will be introduced to the patient chart, patient Kardex, basic Meditech system principles, and forms associated with different hospital tests and procedures.

INTRODUCTION TO SIMPLY ACCOUNTING
This course provides students with minimal experience in the field of bookkeeping or accounting the ability to learn the skills and terminology necessary to work with computerized accounting in a small business. Through a progressive set of lectures and challenge exercises in each chapter, students gain the knowledge and get the practice to complete basic computerized accounting work.

MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES
Students are introduced to proper techniques to ensure patient/client confidentiality; efficiently schedule patient/client appointments; medical ethics; screen, triage, manage incoming and outgoing calls; records management such as creating, maintaining, and proper disposal of medical charts; discuss the importance of security, privacy, and confidentiality of health records and explain how to preserve them; understanding different components of the medical charts; and other administrative office procedures. Students will also learn how to use the Physician’s Manual and simulated billing and order entry software. Also covered are details of the Workplace Health Safety and Compensation Commission of New Brunswick billing system, and private billing procedures.

MEDICAL KEYBOARDING
This aspect of the course places emphasis on proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is also placed on speed and accuracy by the development of skills in typing a variety of medical documents. Students must reach 50 words per minute in order to graduate.

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION
The student learns to use modern transcription equipment and will develop speed and accuracy during medical transcription. Transcription skills, retention skills, proof- reading/editing medical reports, and the ability to follow oral instructions are practiced. Emphasis is focused on accuracy and speed. The student will learn to efficiently transcribe and create appropriate medical documents such as: history and physical reports, consultations, chart/progress notes, X-ray reports, operative reports, and business letters.

DENTAL OFFICE PROCEDURES
The student will receive comprehensive education and training in the application of charting, tooth numbering systems, dental terminology, types of dental treatment, dental specialties and complete dental insurance details.

SELF-DIRECTED STUDIES
This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire duration of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Emphasis in this area is placed on giving the student competence in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office software, which is becoming the software of choice for most of today’s medical offices. The student becomes familiar with the operation of Microsoft’s latest office software Office 2013, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively and the Internet as an effective office tool.

COMMUNICATIONS FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
This module covers the most important rules of medical grammar, punctuation, capitalization and writing numbers. Students will test their understanding by completing exercises correlating to every rule and subject covered in the module. The module is designed to enhance the confidence of the student as to the mastery of the rules of English grammar and punctuation.

PRACTICUM
The student that meets all the work term criteria will be placed in a work environment for a six-week period.
 

Course Descriptions

DISPENSING THEORY I

This introductory course to dispensing will look at the history of eye glasses and their design. It will also include an introduction to the instruments used in a dispensary and how they work.

FABRICATION AND DISPENSING LAB I

This is a practical application course, putting to use the knowledge learned in Dispensing Theory I and an introduction to the assembly of spectacles.

CONTACT LENS THEORY I

This introductory theory course will give the student a basic knowledge of the history of contact lenses, their design, materials and contact lens terminology. Included is optics specific to contact lens fitting. Instrumentation used for fitting and health assessment will be introduced.

CONTACT LENS LAB I

This is an introductory class that will familiarize students with measurement taking using a keratometer, and verify parameters and the condition of hard and soft contact lenses as well as an introduction to the slit-lamp and its use.

OCULAR SCIENCE l

This is an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the eye and its surrounding area. Anatomical defects and the disease process will be discussed.

OPTICS I

This is an introduction to physical optics. Lens types, concepts and calculations used for lens fabrication will be explored.

COMMUNICATION AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

This is a communications course focusing on verbal and non-verbal communication skills. Cross cultural differences and how to relate to them will be discussed in this course as well.

DISPENSING THEORY II

In this dispensing theory course, the proper methods for frame adjustments and the tools used to adjust them will be studied. Rx interpretation and the relationship between frame, lens and Rx selection will be introduced.

FABRICATION AND DISPENSING LAB II

This is a hands on course of tasks discussed in dispensing theory and a continuation of fabrication of spectacles along with instruction on use of tools and measuring devices found in an on-site lab.

CONTACT LENS THEORY II

This course continues the students' learning of fitting procedures for hard and soft contact lenses. It will also give the student an understanding of the different illuminations performed using a slit-lamp. Fitting assessment, wear schedules, and indicators for contact lens wear are studied as well.

CONTACT LENS LAB II

This course will focus on the slit-lam and its illuminations. Students will also learn to fit hard spherical and back toric lenses as well as soft lens fitting for a spherical lens.

OCULAR SCIENCE II

This course is a continuation of the understanding of anatomy and physiology of the eye and its surrounding area. Systemic disease that affects the eye will also be explored.

OPTICS II

This course will look at the theory of reflection and refraction. Other topics will include simple optical systems and lens image formation.

STANDARDS OF PRACTICE I

This course will look at ethics, legislation, privacy, consent and licensing. Workplace safety regarding current procedures for infectious disease control and prevention are also reviewed.

CUSTOMER SERVICE

This course will focus on customer service skills and sensitivity training with respect to diversity and culture. Seminars and role play will be a large part of this course.

CLINICAL

This course will have two components. The first is in college, at the dispensary supervised by the Instructors, and the second will be in a work place supervised by Licensed Opticians, Optometrist or Ophthalmologists. Logs will be kept of fitting and skills learnt.

DISPENSING THEORY III

The third in our courses on dispensing eyewear will focus on multi-focal and task specific lens designs. We will look at aphakia and special considerations for dispensing to the aphakic eye. How lenses are ground generated will also be studied.

FABRICATION AND DISPENSING LAB III

This course complements dispensing theory III and continues to have the student practice frame adjustments and measurements for task specific glasses. Continued lab and spectacle assembly are practiced to better the student in a finishing lab.

CONTACT LENS THEORY III

This continuation of the two prior contact lens theory courses continues to study advanced hard and soft lens design and fitting. The student will also study complications due to contact lens wear, special lens fitting considerations and modifications with respect to contact lenses.

CONTACT LENS LAB III

This lab course compliments Contact Lens Theory III. Measurements of contact lens parameters and power, tolerances accepted for manufacturing, specialty lenses for conditions such as Keratoconus and bi-toric hard lens fitting will be examined.

OCULAR SCIENCE III

This course continues to examine anatomy and physiology of the eye and its surrounding area. Muscles of the eye both internal and external along with their function and dysfunctions will be studied.

OPTICS III

This course will study the principles and calculations used to design and order a patient/clients contact lenses based on power and measurements and look at aberrations with regards to contact lenses.

DISPENSING THEORY IV

In this course, low vision and methods for enabling use of what vision is available will be studied. Also being studied will be anisometripia and methods of correction for this condition.

FABRICATION AND DISPENSING LAB IV

This course will be a review of all aspects discussed regarding dispensing and lab work. A large amount of the focus will be in the clinic.

Course Descriptions

PHR – 102 PHARMACEUTICAL MATHEMATICS I (60 hours)

The student will review mathematical fundamentals and develop a working knowledge of the various systems of metric, apothecary, and imperial weights and measures encountered in the pharmacy which will enable the student to accurately prepare prescriptions. The student will become familiar with strength designations and will perform various dosage calculations and interpret drug orders.

PHR – 103 KEYBOARDING (36 hours)

Keyboarding is a foundation skill required for effective computer usage. By use of an all–in–one self–paced keyboarding instruction program, the student will develop proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is placed on speed and accuracy. A typing speed of 40 wpm is required for completion of this module.

PHR – 104 DRUG NAMES AND CLASSES (39 hours)

This course will take place throughout the program, enabling the student to become familiar with the brand name, the generic name, the pronunciation and the drug classification of the top 400 drugs commonly used in Canada.

PHR – 105 BASIC CONCEPTS IN PHARMACOLOGY (60 hours)

Pharmacology is one of the most challenging subjects for those embarking on careers in pharmacy and the health sciences. In this introductory module, the student will be introduced to the history and practice of pharmacy and the historical and current role that pharmacy, the pharmaceutical industry, and government play in the delivery of health care. The evolving role of the pharmacy technician will be examined and the student will be introduced to terminology related to the pharmacy profession. Also discussed will be Canadian drug regulation and approval along with drug classes, schedules and categories. Various dosage forms, including their advantages and disadvantages, along with methods of drug delivery and what happens after a drug has been administered will be presented. Knowledge of the routes of administration allows the student to comprehend how a particular drug reaches its target site.

PHR – 106 INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT OFFICE (40 hours)

Emphasis in this module is placed on giving the student fundamental competence in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office 2007 software which, increasingly, is becoming the software of choice for most of today’s businesses. The student will also learn to use e-mail to communicate productively and the Internet as an effective business tool. Emphasis is placed upon learning the knowledge and skills required to enable individuals to perform efficiently and collaboratively as a member of the healthcare team.

PHR – 107 DISPENSING LAB I (40 hours)

This module will introduce the student to pharmacy dispensing software and will cover the basics of pharmaceutical dispensing: entering a prescription, collecting and managing the patient profile, and processing a prescription. At the completion of the course, the student will be able to perform the basics of dispensing while utilizing a pharmacy dispensing software system.

PHR – 201 APPLIED ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (96 hours)

This course is unique in offering the foundational knowledge of anatomy and physiology accompanied by the corresponding medical terminology. The identification of medical words is taught through word analysis (prefixes, root words and suffixes). Emphasis will be placed on the structure and function of the major body systems and the pathophysiology of common diseases and conditions associated with each system. The student will become familiar with clinical procedures, laboratory tests and abbreviations related to each system and other specialized areas of medicine. Completion of this course will allow the student to confidently communicate with other health care professionals and patients and will aid the student in their understanding of pharmacological concepts.

PHR – 202 PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS I (48 hours)

A comprehensive, interdisciplinary perspective drawing upon core concepts of anatomy, physiology and pathology will be used in order to make drug therapy more understandable. The student will expand his/her previously learned core concepts in pharmacology via a disease and body system approach. The student will learn the therapeutic effects of prescription medications, non-prescription medications and alternative therapies commonly used in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases that affect the nervous, cardiovascular and urinary systems. Using the prototype approach to drug therapy, the student will learn the brand and generic names and classifications of common medications in Canada along with their mechanisms of action, major side-effects, contraindications, dosage forms and routes of administration.

PHR – 203 NON–STERILE COMPOUNDING TECHNIQUES (180 hours)

In this module, the student will develop the complex skills and the professional demeanour necessary to take on the increasingly important role of compounding various pharmaceutical products to meet the specific needs of the patient. The student will learn to compound non–sterile products, including calculation of the correct amount of each ingredient and the use of the correct compounding equipment with the proper techniques. WHMIS protocols will also be learned. Practice will include compounding lotions, creams, ointments, solutions, suspensions, gels and capsules along with preparing other non–traditional compounds such as suppositories, lollipops, lip balms and gummi–bears. Proper and timely cleaning and maintenance of compounding equipment will also be stressed. Emphasis is placed on accuracy and the preparation of a pharmaceutically elegant product.

PHR – 204 PHARMACEUTICAL MATHEMATICS II (54 hours)

Advanced calculations in IV, TPN and chemotherapy preparations along with pediatric dosing and preparing dilutions will be included in this module in order to prepare the student for employment in a hospital pharmacy. Accuracy is stressed throughout the course along with techniques to detect and reduce medication errors.

PHR – 205 THE PROFESSIONAL PHARMACY TECHNICIAN (24 hours)

Principles relating to the role of the pharmacy technician, professional manner and image, attitude, initiative, accountability, adapting to change, accepting criticism, motivation, ethics, interpersonal relations, group dynamics, team building, conflict resolution, leadership, teamwork, problem–solving and other workplace issues are investigated. Through simulations, activities and role–playing of patient–technician and technician–healthcare team situations, the student will learn the knowledge and skills required to enable them to perform professionally and confidently as a member of the healthcare team.

PHR – 207 DISPENSING LAB II (40 hours)

This module will build the student’s proficiency in using pharmacy dispensing software as they move on to completing the entire dispensing process with simulated prescriptions and medications. Successful completion of this course will include processing 100 uncomplicated prescriptions without error.

PHR – 301 RETAIL AND LONG–TERM CARE PHARMACY (81 hours)

The student will practice receiving, dispensing and releasing prescriptions through simulations, role–playing, and other techniques. Emphasis is placed on the correct dispensing techniques, including computer entry, measuring, labeling, packaging, product presentation, and prescription processing. The student will build his/her skills of receiving, dispensing and releasing prescriptions. The role of community and long–term care pharmacies, including the various equipment and devices used in these environments, will also be explored. Students will gain efficiency, speed and accuracy in selecting and processing pharmaceutical products using drug interchangeability information, third–party and formulary restrictions and other resources. He/she will also learn inventory management of medications, including narcotics and controlled drugs, along with various clerical functions.

PHR – 302 PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS II (75 hours)

This continuation of pharmacology and therapeutics will cover the therapeutic effects of prescription medications, non–prescription medications and alternative therapies commonly used in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases that affect various body systems such as the immune, respiratory, visual, auditory, gastrointestinal, reproductive and endocrine systems. Using the prototype approach to drug therapy, the students will learn the brand and generic names and classifications of common medications in Canada along with their mechanisms of action, major side-effects, contraindications, dosage forms and routes of administration.

PHR – 303 HOSPITAL PHARMACY (45 hours)

The student will be introduced to the hospital environment including its structure, organization, and the role in health–care delivery. The roles of the hospital pharmacist, pharmacy technician, and other health care professionals will be discussed. The various drug–distribution systems used in hospitals will be presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. The student will be introduced to medication order processing as well as the role of a drug formulary in a hospital setting. Purchasing and inventory control and record–keeping requirements are also discussed.

PHR – 304 STERILE PRODUCT PREPARATION (68 hours)

In both health care facilities and community pharmacies, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians aseptically prepare sterile products. Students will be introduced to the basic principles of microbiology as they relate to the practice of pharmacy along with the concepts of sterility, aseptic technique, sterilization methods, infection control and incompatibilities. The student will gain practical experience in the correct preparation, measuring, computer entry, labelling and packaging of the sterile hospital prescription, including IV Admixtures, TPNs and ophthalmic preparations, according to appropriate standards of practice relating to the preparation of sterile products in the pharmacy. Emphasis is placed on accurate dispensing techniques, including methods of checking work for accuracy, while also ensuring sterility of the product.

PHR – 305 COMMUNICATION & CUSTOMER CARE (38 hours)

The student will develop good verbal and written communication skills while caring for the customer. The communication process, types and methods of communication, and barriers to communication will be discussed. Caring for customers and patients and maintaining confidentiality will be emphasized. Verbal communication will be enhanced through effective use of the telephone and simulating patient–technician/technician–healthcare situations. Throughout the course, the student will become familiar with the operation of Microsoft’s Office 2007 software as a means of written communication, will use e–mail to communicate productively, and will use reputable Internet sources for research.

PHR – 306 EMPLOYMENT PREPARATION (15 hours)

This module will prepare the student for employment. The student will produce an effective and professional resume, cover letter and thank you letter in preparation for gaining employment as a pharmacy technician. The student will gain an understanding of current hiring practices as well as effective interview and job search techniques while participating in role–playing exercises to further his/her skills. A mock employment interview will be conducted during the course in order to prepare the student for gaining employment.

PHR – 307 DISPENSING LAB III (105 hours)

This final module on dispensing will allow the student to practice drug distribution and dispensing within a simulated retail and hospital environment, including performing an independent double check on prescriptions/medication orders, filing and scanning prescriptions, blister packaging, compounding, interacting with the customer, enhancing communication skills, teaching device usage to patients, practicing inventory control and collaborating inter-professionally with the pharmacist. Completion of 100 prescriptions without error in each dispensing position will be one requirement of successfully completing this course.

PHR – 401 CLINICAL RETAIL PHARMACY EXPERIENCE (CRPE) (160 hours)

At the completion of the program, the student will participate in a four–week retail pharmacy experience in order to continue his/her training as a pharmacy technician. Specific objectives must be met in order to complete this module successfully. Successful completion of this module is mandatory for graduation from the program.

PHR – 402 CLINICAL HOSPITAL PHARMACY EXPERIENCE (CHPE) (160 hours)

At the completion of the program, the student will participate in a four–week hospital pharmacy experience in order to continue his/her training as a pharmacy technician. Specific objectives must be met in order to complete this module successfully. Successful completion of this module is mandatory for graduation from the program.

BUS – 665 SELF – DIRECTED STUDIES

This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one–on–one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire length of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.
 

Course Descriptions

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

This course provides a comparative review of the gross and microscopic anatomy as well as basic physiology of selected species. Topics will include organs, organ systems, and organ system functions within the animal body. Students will also learn the fundamentals of medical terminology.

LAB PROCEDURES I

The student will learn and be able to identify the various internal and external parasites encountered in veterinary medicine, as well as components of urine, and the importance of testing. The student will also perform urinalysis and parasite testing.

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT

This course will deal with client relations, scheduling appointments, telephone techniques, client education, record keeping and effective communication. There will be a strong focus on veterinary medical terminology. The student will also receive an introduction to Veterinary Practice Management Software. There will be discussion on euthanasia, grief and the human-animal bond. Upon completion of this course, students will be effective veterinary receptionists and demonstrate excellent customer service techniques.

CALCULATIONS

Students will learn how to problem solve, to understand drug labels and calculate drug dosages, to calculate IV fluid rates, and become familiar with various units of measure and conversion between units.

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

Basic animal behaviors such as how sick and healthy animals communicate as well as inappropriate behaviors are covered in this course. Housetraining and interacting with animals in a clinic situation will be emphasized. Learn to understand normal behavior of domestic animals and recognize signs of pain, aggression, or fear as encountered in veterinary practices and interacting with these animals appropriately.

SMALL ANIMAL NUTRITION/LARGE ANIMAL NUTRITION

After learning the basic principles of nutrition, students will then be shown how to apply this knowledge when reading labels, or advising clients on what diets are available for different life stages and disease processes. Topics discussed will include: nutritional goals, nutrients vs. ingredients, pet food production, forage recognition, equine diets, special diets, and client counselling.

CLINICAL EXERCISES (SPCA/CLINIC)

This course includes field trips to the local SPCA to help facilitate the practical skills acquired within the animal nursing 1 and 11 courses. While here the student gains hands-on experience with basic husbandry, restraint, medication administration, as well as wound cares.

ANIMAL NURSING I

This course will provide the student with the knowledge and practical skills necessary to develop various small animal nursing skills. The student will learn how to restrain and safely examine animals as well as administer medications, collect diagnostic samples for interpretation, and perform minor procedures including pedicure, ear cleanings, and urinary catheterizations.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This course is a continuation of the material learned in Anatomy and Physiology 101. The student will continue to learn of gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy and physiology of selected species.

LAB PROCEDURES II

The student will learn the basic components of blood. Emphasis will be placed on the erythron and clotting functions. The student will learn to perform basic hematology testing involved in a Complete Blood Count.

DISSECTION

The student will dissect preserved/fresh specimens and identify various organs and structures.

IMMUNOLOGY AND DISEASES

An introduction to the immune system including the structure and function of lymph nodes, bone marrow and leukocytes. Topics include the immune response, active and passive immunity, hypersensitivities, and auto immunity. Emphasis is placed on why we vaccinate, what we vaccinate for, vaccine protocols and why vaccines sometimes fail.

SURGERY II (THEORY)

This course will provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively monitor the anesthetized patient as well as upon surgical recovery. Learners will develop skills in the function and the use of anesthetic equipment, care, induction, and maintenance of anesthetic patients, selecting anesthetic drug protocols and troubleshooting.

CLINICAL EXERCISES

This course serves as an introduction to surgical instrumentation, preparation of surgical packs and sterilization techniques. Students will learn pre-anesthetic and pre-surgical patient preparation, sterile techniques including standard operating room conduct, opening surgical packs, as well as aseptically gowning and gloving.

SMALL ANIMAL NURSING II

This course is a continuation of the material learned in small animal nursing 140. The student will learn the skills necessary to provide quality nursing care to small animals. Material covered will include fluid therapy as well as how to administer it, wound classification, wound care and management, proper bandaging techniques as well as the basics in alternative medicine. This course has a practical component where skills are learned and assessed in combination with other courses practical skills and assessments.

LAB PROCEDURES III

The student will further study the components of blood. Emphasis will be placed on the leukogram and clinical chemistries. Care and use of various laboratory instruments will also be covered. The student will learn to perform a complete hematology panel, as well as using the various in-house blood analyzers.

THERIO AND GENETICS

Students will learn the relationship between our animal’s environment, brain, and reproductive organs. The different hormones responsible for initiating as well as controlling the reproductive cycle will be explained. Expected behavior during the estrus cycle, appropriate timing and techniques for breeding and parturition will be discussed. Basic genetics will be covered to give the student an understanding of the definitions associated with inheritance, monohybrid and dihybrid cross and how to use the Punnett square. Outbreeding, backbreeding, inbreeding, line breeding, X-linked genes and chromosomal abnormalities will be taught.

DENTISTRY

Detailed dental anatomy, charting of the mouth, understanding the cause and importance of periodontal disease, as well as treatment options and home care are all discussed. Also during the clinical exercise (VT 421 and 521), students will perform real dental cleanings on anesthetized animals.

INTRO TO PHARMACOLOGY

Introduces students to the terminology, routes of administration and mathematics unique to pharmacology.

SURGERY III

Students will be introduced to the common surgical procedures performed in the veterinary hospital. Reasons for the procedures as well as the technician’s role before, during and after each procedure will be explained.

CLINICAL EXERCISES

Students participate in actual surgeries acting as Prep nurse, OR nurse, and Surgical assistant. These are real surgeries being done on site in our NBVMA accredited clinic thus allowing first year students to become accustomed to our clinic before entering second year.

SURGERY PREP INTRO

The student will be given this time to prepare his/her assigned patient for surgery. A complete physical exam and pre-surgical blood work will be completed in this time. This will be at the end of the first year.

LAB PROCEDURES IV

The student will learn the principles and procedures behind basic cytology and microbiology. Emphasis will be placed on proper collection and preparation methods for sample evaluation.

EMERGENCY AND CRITICAL CARE

This course will educate students about the various emergencies that may be encountered in clinic and the technician’s role in these situations, including anesthetic emergencies, toxicological emergencies and cardiac arrest. We will also cover dealing with the critically ill patient, including anesthesia, medications and nutrition.

COMMON DISEASES

The student will learn about common diseases (acquired and genetic) affecting small animals. Emphasis will be placed on client education and care of the ill patient.

EXOTICS

The student will learn about the principles of animal research and the regulatory bodies that govern research. The student will learn receiving, testing and quarantine procedures. As well, the student will learn how to perform physical examinations, basic care procedures, administer medications, and collect samples for testing on species such as rabbits, ferrets, guinea pigs, mice, rats, gerbils, hamsters, avian species, non- human primates, reptiles and wildlife.

RADIOLOGY

In this course students gain an understanding and will be able to demonstrate radiology safety measures, proper care and maintenance of radiographic equipment, patient positioning, and processing of radiographs. Students will be taught how to recognize common technical errors on processed radiographs and how to correct them. The student will gain experience and develop skills with both stationary small animal and mobile large animal x-ray equipment.

PHARMACOLOGY

This course will examine common medications used in veterinary medicine, prescription dispensing, handling, storing and documentation of controlled substances, routes and methods of drug administration. Students will develop a working knowledge of veterinary medications, terminology, proper handling, administration and possible side effects of drugs and prescription dispensing protocol.

CLINIC EXERCISES

Students participate in actual surgeries acting as Prep nurse, OR nurse, Surgical assistant, and Anesthetist. These are real surgeries being done on site in our NBVMA accredited clinic thus allowing students to practice their skills through real hands on experience.

SURGERY PREP

The student will be given this time to prepare his/her assigned patient for surgery. A complete physical exam and pre-surgical blood work will be completed in this time.

POST OP

Through a combination of photos and notes taken by instructors, all surgeries are discussed and examined as a group to allow students to learn from each other’s experiences.

LARGE ANIMAL NURSING

Through a combination of lectures and field trips, students will learn how to safely handle and work around cattle, horses and sheep. As well, methods for blood collection, parenteral injections and administering oral medications will be taught.

LAB V MICRO

In this course, students will learn the basics of Mycology, Microbiology and Virology, as well as how to collect, store and culture various micro-organisms.

PRACTICUM

The student is placed on a 6-week practicum session.
 

Course Descriptions

HARDWARE FUNDAMENTALS
By course end a student should have an understanding of basic PC hardware, and should know how to recognize, clean, handle, install, diagnose, understand the function of, and know the different types of each of the following components:

  • CPU’s
  • CD and DVD media drives
  • RAM
  • Sound and Video card
  • Motherboards
  • Monitors
  • Cases, and power supplies
  • Modems & NICs
  • ROM / CMOS, firmware
  • Printers
  • Expansion buses
  • Cables and connectors
  • Floppy drives
  • Laptops and docking stations
  • IDE drives
  • Network hubs, cabling, wireless
  • SCSI devices
  • Fans and Heat sinks
  • Keyboards, mice


OPERATING SYSTEM ESSENTIALS
This module introduces students to the world of computer operating systems. Focus will be aimed at preparing students to support Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7 client systems in a home or office environment.

The primary goal of this module is to ensure students have advanced knowledge in preparing computers for operating system deployments, using the built-in administrative utilities to extract the optimal performance and security from the operating system and the ability to recognize problems and recover from them effectively. Equal emphasis will be shown to administration of home computers as to computers in a corporate environment. Among the many topics covered, students will become skilled at performing routing procedures at the command line.

This module, in combination with the Hardware Fundamentals module, is designed to help prepare students for CompTIA’s A+ certification exams (220-801 and 220-802), Microsoft Technology Associate certification exam for Operating System Essentials (98- 349) and Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist exam for Windows 7 configuration (70-680).

MICROSOFT NETWORKING ESSENTIALS
Upon completion the student will be able to:

  • Understand the concepts of Internet, intranet, and extranet, including: VPN, security zones, & firewalls.
  • Understand local area networks (LANs) & wide area networks (WANs) covering: perimeter networks; addressing; reserved address ranges for local use (including local loopback ip), VLANs; wired LAN and wireless LAN, leased lines, dial-up, ISDN, VPN, T1, T3, E1, E3, DSL, Cable, etc. and their characteristics (speed, availability).
  • Understand wireless networking. Types of wireless networking standards and their characteristics (802.11A,B,G,N including different Ghz ranges), types of network security (WPA/WEP/802.1X etc.), point-to-point (P2P) wireless, wireless bridging

UNDERSTANDING NETWORK HARDWARE

  • Understand switches, including managed or unmanaged switches; VLAN capabilities; Layer 2 and Layer 3 switches, security options; hardware redundancy; support; backplane speed; switching types, MAC table; understanding capabilities of hubs vs. Switches.
  • Understand router transmission speed, directly connected routes, static routing, dynamic routing (routing protocols), default routes; routing table and how it selects best route(s); routing table memory, NAT, software routing in Windows Server
  • Understand media types: cable types and their characteristics, including media segment length and speed; fibre optic; twisted pair shielded or nonshielded; catxx cabling, wireless; susceptibility to external interference (machinery, power cables, etc); susceptibility to electricity (lightning), susceptibility to interception.
  • Understand the OSI model and the TCP model; examples of devices, protocols, applications and which OSI/TCP layer they belong to; TCP and UDP; well-known ports for most used purposes, packets and frames.
  • Understand IPv4 & IPv6 including such topics as: subnetting; IPconfig; why use IPv6; addressing; ipv4toipv6 tunnelling protocols to ensure backwards compatibility; dual IP stack; subnet mask; gateway; ports; packets; reserved address ranges for local use (including local loopback IP);
  • Understand names resolution methods such as: DNS, WINS, steps in the name resolution process, and networking services like: DHCP, remote access
  • Finally coverage of troubleshooting tools such as ping; tracert; pathping; Telnet; IPconfig, and netstat.

This module is designed to assist students in their preparation for the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) certification exam (98-366).

ACTIVE DIRECTORY
This module teaches students, through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, textbook exercises, and classroom labs, the skills and knowledge which form the foundation of preparation necessary for administering an Active Directory Domain Services implementation on Windows Server 2008.

The module begins by examining planning an Active Directory deployment including advanced concepts in DNS deployment. Subsequent topics are devoted to user and group administration, physical considerations when deploying Active Directory and group policy deployment.
This module will also include a one week hands-on project where students are presented with a real-world case study and prepare that enterprise network in class.

This module is designed to assist students in their preparation for the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) certification exam (70-640).

WINDOWS SERVER NETWORK SERVICES
This module examines the setup and administration of networking services essential to the proper operation of a Windows domain environment.

The module examines configuring Windows Server as a web server, a DNS server, a DHCP server, a network router, a remote access server, a file and print server and other associated topic areas.

This module will also include a one week hands-on project where students are presented with a real-world case study and prepare that enterprise network in class

LINUX
Students will be introduced to installing, configuring and managing both Debian-based and Red Hat-based distributions of Linux. Topics covered include command-line administration, user and group maintenance, and file system manipulation. Students will become familiar with both the KDE and GNOME desktop environments.

SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS
This module provides further refinement of the core concepts in securing a Windows Server from the numerous dangers that threaten them. The ability to detect risk and recommend security countermeasures is a key skill that will be developed throughout this module. Students will learn to detect and categorizes various forms of malware as well as detect and combat social engineering and phishing attacks.

The user authentication process will be studied as well as the forms of access control available to Windows Server administrators. The fundamentals of cryptography including encryption, digital certificates and the public key infrastructure are also covered in detail.

This module is designed to assist students in their preparation for the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) certification exam (98-367).

ETHICAL HACKING
Students will develop the foundations to secure a network and to become a better network administrator. This course prepares students to defend their corporate environment against malicious attackers by exploring the world of hacking. Students will learn the techniques and methods used by real hackers to compromise systems in order to discover ways their environments might be vulnerable to these attacks.

Among the hacking techniques discussed will be reconnaissance methods, using automated scanning tools to profile a network or computer system, using malware to compromise system security, password cracking, denial of service and distributed denial of service attacks, and compromising wireless security. The material in this course will also help prepare a student for CompTIA’s Security+ certification exam and the EC-Council’s Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) exam.

CISCO ROUTERS
Students learn configuration of Cisco routers and switches using Cisco’s IOS. The following topics will be covered: introduction to Internetworking Technology, concepts and commands required to configure Cisco Routers and switches in small to medium multi-protocol networks, experience configuring fully operational Cisco routers and switches, apply Cisco IOS software commands to start up and configure a newly installed router and switch, perform all basic configuration procedures to build a multi- router, multi-group network that uses LAN and WAN interfaces for the most commonly used routing and routed protocols. The student will be able to challenge for Cisco’s CCNA and CCENT certifications.
 

Course Descriptions

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY
This course introduces the sciences of anatomy and physiology and the basic structure, functions and assessment of the human body in its state of wellness. Integration of systems and maintenance of homeostasis within the body will also be discussed.

COMMUNICATION AND PROFESSIONALISM
Through an interactive classroom environment the student will gain the basic skills and techniques necessary to communicate appropriately with staff, patients, clients, families and other health care providers and emergency personnel. Focus will also be given to the importance of proper documentation and reporting. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, and journals, role playing and guest speakers. Skills in the class are practiced throughout remaining courses and semesters.

PRE-CLINICAL PARAMEDICAL THEORY
Through an interactive classroom setting, students will gain knowledge of theory related to the foundation of appropriate response and delivery of care. Students will know and practice the principles behind the skills required for health assessment that will be delivered in medical and traumatic situations. As well, students will be able to use and understand the terminology used in paramedicine.

SKILLS LAB I
This course will include an introduction to the skills required to be able to gather patient information, assess the patient's condition, and initiate medical interventions. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to perform basic skills that are commonly required in the care of patients. These skills are required in acute, long term and community settings. The student must be successful in both the theory and all lab components of this course.

NUTRITION & HEALTHY LIVING
This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living. It also fosters patients' learning and practice of self care practices and how these relate to total patient health. This class will include in class theory as well as activities.

CLINICAL PRACTICE
During this series of clinical courses, students will provide care, education and interventions in practice. Clinics may be held on site or in a variety of agency/clinical settings. Clinics will be sequenced appropriately based on theory material covered. Clinical practice will be experienced in a variety of community and institutional settings in order to introduce students to different populations and health settings.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
This theory course will introduce human diseases and the fundamentals of homeostatic mechanisms. Mechanisms of disease and how alterations to body systems affect healthy structure and function will be illustrated through exploring common disease states. This is an extensive course that will be delivered in modules covering of the systems and related interventions and responses to each condition, disease or symptom in a systematic approach.

PRACTICE STANDARDS FOR HEALTH CARE IN CANADA
This course introduces the ethical and legal responsibilities of practise. Discussion centers on provincial and national regulations. Students will learn the code of ethics, quality controls and protection of the public along with in depth discussion on professional responsibilities.

PARAMEDICAL PRACTISE II
This course is continued from the Paramedical Practise I course. Students will gain an understanding of the theory required for the treatment of more complex cases.

SKILLS LAB II
The lab experience will continue to be a time for students to integrate their knowledge and skills in providing simulated care to fellow students and simulation equipment. The level of care the students will be able to provide will be of a higher level and their critical thinking will be tested with each scenario given.

SPECIALTY PRACTISE HEALTH CARE
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the process of care that is required in trauma, mental health and other specialty areas of practise.

PHARMACOLOGY
This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and the basic drug groups and uses. Proper terminology and the familiarization of their uses in planning and delivery of care will be discussed. Topics covered will include: drug nomenclature, legal issues, pharmaco-kinetics and principles of pharmacology.

MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION/IV
This course teaches the basic concepts of pharmacological theory and the skills necessary to safely administer medications through oral, rectal and injectable sites. The student will also learn the proper administration techniques of IV initiation and it's responsibilities and legal implications.

CLINICAL FEEDBACK
During weekly sessions students ill bring topics for discussion to class from clinical/community activities to share learning with classmates and faculty. This will also be a forum for discussing pertinent issues related to patient care, process and placements that are important to address with faculty. Portions of this class will be used to discuss issues related to procedures, practise, progression and performance expectations as students gain more knowledge.

PRACTICUM
Students will be placed in offsite settings for 12-16 weeks as they become integrated in a real life setting and practise the summative nature of the day to day work of a paramedic. Students may be required to gain membership to the association in order to perform all duties required for completion of the program. This portion of the program is intended to allow students to gain exposure to a variety of settings under the supervision of a mentor.

Students will be expected to perform effectively as a paramedic team member, demonstration professional patient and inter-professional relationships and work practises.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

*Although some clinic/lab sessions will be on site, students will be responsible for travel and costs associated with relocation, travel and other, to access assigned clinical sites. Clinical rotations are scheduled throughout the program.

*Fees for interim licence, provincial registration and licensure and national exam fees are not included. Eligibility for exam writing and licensure for employment is dependent on program accreditation. Students must acknowledge program status.

*Because of the nature of work of a paramedic, understanding the mental and physical demands of the profession is the key to your success.

Additional training to include: Back in Form, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, WHIMIS, CPR and First Aid.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS AND ETHICS

This module will provide the students with knowledge of ethics and law in dentistry and the dental assisting profession. The class will consist of instruction and practical role playing experiences that will allow the student to implement their communication skills in the dental office and with the public.

COMMUNICATIONS AND DENTAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

Students will gain an understanding of the roles of a receptionist and how to communicate effectively. Understanding the psychology of a patient, the proper maintenance of a patient file, accounts payable/receivable, payroll and insurance form procedures and processing will be taught. Basic banking procedures commonly used will also be covered.

MICROBIOLOGY

Oral microbiology will focus on the study of microorganisms existing in the oral cavity. Knowledge of microbiology and the role of infectious diseases in the dental office will be covered.

INTRO TO CLINIC

The students will complete the theory required to be able to confidently practice in a clinical setting. Sterilization, disinfection and orientation to the office and clinical set up will be taught and reinforced through clinical experience.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will include an orientation to the structures of the human body and the functions within them. Topics covered: parts of the cell to the major body systems and how they work together.

DENTAL SCIENCES

This course will educate the students in dental sciences including embryology, landmarks of the oral cavity and components of the dentition. Applying the information to a clinic setting by demonstrating the ability to complete a patient record will be achieved.

DENTAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will educate the students in dental health, allowing them to recognize, explain, and demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques to their patients. The skills required to perform preventative dental assisting tasks will be demonstrated in a clinic setting as students practice on a typodont, each other and graduate to patient care. This course also covers basic nutrition theory that will allow the student to be able to discuss the relationship between diet and good dental health with their patients. Community dental health projects will be prepared and delivered throughout the year.

PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

A dental assistant student will gain the understanding of objectives related to the classification of drugs, how they affect dental procedures and how to use drug reference material, including understanding prescriptions. The knowledge and understanding of medical emergencies and how to assist during one of these emergencies is key to a dental practice.

RADIOLOGY

Basic principles of physics and radiography will be covered, ensuring that the student understands the importance of radiology and the safety precautions required to operate a dental X-ray unit. Techniques will be taught in class and practical experience will be gained later in the program.

RESTORATIVE

Chair side intra-oral procedures and processes will be detailed in a classroom setting, demonstrated evaluated in the clinic. The student will learn to recognize and understand the procedures, instruments and materials used to complete common restorative appointments.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY/ORAL PATHOLOGY

This course will provide the student with a detailed description of the head and neck region including theory as it relates to the bones, muscles, nerves, and blood supply. This course will also present the student with material on diseases of the oral cavity and diagnostic information that a dentist would use to determine pathologies. The course consists of classroom material enhanced with a series of instructor handouts and visual materials.

DENTAL SPECIALTIES

This module is comprised of a series of seminars derived from dental specialties. Information will be delivered as it relates to the practice of a dental assistant in any specialty office. The course is supported by a series of guest speakers and office rotations.

DENTAL RECORDS

Tooth morphology and proper charting will be covered during this module. A clinical chart will be discussed in depth including details on obtaining information and being able to complete a chart in detail. Students will learn how to complete a chart and to understand the importance of being able to communicate the information to the patient.

LABORATORY PROCEDURES

Taking place in a lab setting, combined with classroom instruction, students will learn the methods of lab procedures such as taking impressions, pouring and trimming models and preparing custom trays.

PATIENT CARE CLINIC

This module will provide the student with the opportunity to learn hands on and be evaluated on all aspects of clinical dental assisting. The complete process of client care will be brought together in a “real” clinic setting as the student schedules patients to be treated in a supervised patient clinic.

RADIOLOGY LAB

The student will practice radiology techniques on a typodont, including safety, exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs.

PRACTICUM

Five weeks of supervised practical clinical experience will be achieved. Student’s time will be spent in a general dentistry practice and have hands-on practice.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS AND ETHICS

This module will provide the students with knowledge of ethics and law in dentistry and the dental assisting profession. The class will consist of instruction and practical role playing experiences that will allow the student to implement their communication skills in the dental office and with the public.

COMMUNICATIONS AND DENTAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

Students will gain an understanding of the roles of a receptionist and how to communicate effectively. Understanding the psychology of a patient, the proper maintenance of a patient file, accounts payable/receivable, payroll and insurance form procedures and processing will be taught. Basic banking procedures commonly used will also be covered.

MICROBIOLOGY

Oral microbiology will focus on the study of microorganisms existing in the oral cavity. Knowledge of microbiology and the role of infectious diseases in the dental office will be covered.

INTRO TO CLINIC

The students will complete the theory required to be able to confidently practice in a clinical setting. Sterilization, disinfection and orientation to the office and clinical set up will be taught and reinforced through clinical experience.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will include an orientation to the structures of the human body and the functions within them. Topics covered: parts of the cell to the major body systems and how they work together.

DENTAL SCIENCES

This course will educate the students in dental sciences including embryology, landmarks of the oral cavity and components of the dentition. Applying the information to a clinic setting by demonstrating the ability to complete a patient record will be achieved.

DENTAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will educate the students in dental health, allowing them to recognize, explain, and demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques to their patients. The skills required to perform preventative dental assisting tasks will be demonstrated in a clinic setting as students practice on a typodont, each other and graduate to patient care. This course also covers basic nutrition theory that will allow the student to be able to discuss the relationship between diet and good dental health with their patients. Community dental health projects will be prepared and delivered throughout the year.

PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

A dental assistant student will gain the understanding of objectives related to the classification of drugs, how they affect dental procedures and how to use drug reference material, including understanding prescriptions. The knowledge and understanding of medical emergencies and how to assist during one of these emergencies is key to a dental practice.

RADIOLOGY

Basic principles of physics and radiography will be covered, ensuring that the student understands the importance of radiology and the safety precautions required to operate a dental X-ray unit. Techniques will be taught in class and practical experience will be gained later in the program.

RESTORATIVE

Chair side intra-oral procedures and processes will be detailed in a classroom setting, demonstrated evaluated in the clinic. The student will learn to recognize and understand the procedures, instruments and materials used to complete common restorative appointments.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY/ORAL PATHOLOGY

This course will provide the student with a detailed description of the head and neck region including theory as it relates to the bones, muscles, nerves, and blood supply. This course will also present the student with material on diseases of the oral cavity and diagnostic information that a dentist would use to determine pathologies. The course consists of classroom material enhanced with a series of instructor handouts and visual materials.

DENTAL SPECIALTIES

This module is comprised of a series of seminars derived from dental specialties. Information will be delivered as it relates to the practice of a dental assistant in any specialty office. The course is supported by a series of guest speakers and office rotations.

DENTAL RECORDS

Tooth morphology and proper charting will be covered during this module. A clinical chart will be discussed in depth including details on obtaining information and being able to complete a chart in detail. Students will learn how to complete a chart and to understand the importance of being able to communicate the information to the patient.

LABORATORY PROCEDURES

Taking place in a lab setting, combined with classroom instruction, students will learn the methods of lab procedures such as taking impressions, pouring and trimming models and preparing custom trays.

PATIENT CARE CLINIC

This module will provide the student with the opportunity to learn hands on and be evaluated on all aspects of clinical dental assisting. The complete process of client care will be brought together in a “real” clinic setting as the student schedules patients to be treated in a supervised patient clinic.

RADIOLOGY LAB

The student will practice radiology techniques on a typodont, including safety, exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs.

PRACTICUM

Five weeks of supervised practical clinical experience will be achieved. Student’s time will be spent in a general dentistry practice and have hands-on practice.

Course Descriptions

WEB DESIGN USING HTML5, CSS3 AND JAVASCRIPT

The emphasis of this module is to teach the students how to build well formatted websites using HTML5 (structure of website), Cascading Style Sheets (look and format), and JavaScript (dynamic user interaction).

Students will learn to:

  • Develop cross-browser (works in all browsers: Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, Opera) websites using XHTML, HTML5 and CSS3
  • Add dynamic user interaction using JavaScript libraries (JQuery, Prototype, Lightbox, etc)
  • Validate user input using JavaScript
  • Upload a Website to their web host
  • Configure a web server (Apache, Internet Information Services) for hosting website
  • Optimize a website for Search Engine Ranking (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.)
  • Create and maintain their own website
  • Optimize document layout for usability and accessibility
  • Validate HTML5 and CSS3 code
  • Work in a team environment with tasks and timelines, deadlines, etc.
  • Use Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 Integrated Development Environment to create websites

Students receive one year free domain name and web hosting to host their personal website, portfolio and projects

BUILDING WEB APPLICATIONS USING PHP AND MYSQL

In this module the students will continue to apply the techniques learned in the previous module (XHTML, HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript) with an emphasis on creating data-driven websites like a Shopping Cart, a Blog, a Content Management System, etc using the PHP web programming language and the MySQL database server.

The students will learn to:

  • Create data-driven dynamic websites using PHP
  • Integrating database content to generate dynamic Web pages
  • Configure the Apache Web server for hosting HTML and PHP websites
  • Use MySQL database server and querying techniques
  • Work in a team environment to build an Online Shopping Cart Website
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, project management skills
  • Use NetBeans Integrated Development Environment to create dynamic websites
  • Use MySQL Administration Tools to manage databases
  • Use the WordPress blogging tool and publishing platform

DATABASE DESIGN AND MICROSOFT SQL SERVER 2012

This module is composed of two parts:

  1. Database Design In this module, students will learn the techniques necessary to design and built a good SQL Server database using Entity Modeling and Relational Design techniques. Students will learn how to use the Microsoft Visio 2010 tool to design database models using the Chen and Crow’s foot models
  2. Querying and Programming a Microsoft SQL Server 2012 database In this module the students will learn how to implement a database from a conceptual model. Student will learn how to query, implement and maintain a database using the SQL (Structured Query Language) language. Students will be using the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio tool.

DEVELOPING ENTERPRISE WEB SOLUTIONS WITH ASP.NET 4.5

This course focuses on using the Microsoft Visual Studio® .NET environment and the Microsoft .NET platform to create an ASP.NET Web application that delivers dynamic content to a website.

The students will learn to:

  • A hands-on approach to build ASP.NET Application for the Web
  • Build dynamic SQL Server data-driven Websites
  • Create customizable Online Shopping Carts, Portals, Blogs, etc.
  • Debug and test ASP.NET web applications
  • Work with ADO.NET Data Sources and Data Controls
  • Create and consume XML Web Services
  • Incorporate AJAX/JQuery technology into ASP.NET applications
  • Validate user input using validation controls
  • Work with Master Pages, skins and themes
  • Authenticate and secure websites
  • Incorporate profiles, personalization, and membership services
  • Configure and deploy website to online hosting services
  • Work in a team environment (with deadlines, deliverables, timelines) to build an SQL Server data-driven Web Application
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, project management skills • Use the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Integrated Development Environment

OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA

This module is divided up into 2 parts:

JAVA CORE PROGRAMMING

In this module, students will learn to build Desktop Applications for different platforms (Windows, Linux, and Macintosh).

Students will learn:

  • The Core Java Programming packages
  • Object oriented software design techniques (Classes, Objects, Interfaces)
  • To design a Graphical User Interface
  • To create data-driven software
  • To use the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment for building desktop applications.

JAVA SERVLETS AND JSP WEB PROGRAMMING

In this module, students will continue applying their knowledge from the Java Core module with an emphasis on building applications for the web.

Students will learn to:

  • Build a data-driven web application using Java Server Pages and Java Servlets
  • Build a Model-View-Controller application
  • Configure Apache Tomcat Web server
  • Package and deploy web applications to web server
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, project management skills
  • Use the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment for building websites
  • Introduction to the Spring MVC Framework

Course Descriptions

PRECLINICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of dental hygiene care. Fundamentals of safe dental hygiene practice and instrumentation skills are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students’ development of the skills defined within the dental hygiene scope of practice. Skills are practiced first on manikins and later on classmates in treatment simulation sessions.

ORAL ANATOMY AND ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES
This theory course covers the recognition of the basic structures and tissues of the oral cavity in health. Emphasis is placed on procedures required to do oral assessments of clients and record findings using accepted clinical symbols according to professional practice standards.

DENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION I AND II
This theory course teaches communication techniques to facilitate management of clients in the clinical setting and to foster clients’ learning of self care practices related to general and oral health. The role of nutrition in maintenance of optimal health is discussed. As students progress to the next levels of health promotion they will discusses the physical, intellectual, and socio-economic factors which influence clients’ decisions and actions in maintaining their oral health and accessing oral health care. Emphasis is placed on individualizing oral self care messages for clients across the lifespan. Nutrition and how it relates to total client care is the focus in HYG-204.

RADIOGRAPHY I AND II
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the history, development and use of radiation in the diagnosis of dental disease. The principles of proper exposure, processing, handling and storage of dental diagnostic radiographs are covered. Radiation hygiene required to protect client and operator from hazardous exposure levels is emphasized. The laboratory portion of the course allows students to refine exposure techniques for standard intraoral views using manikins. Bisecting angle, paralleling and occlusal plane techniques are studied. Clinical simulations with classmates and exposures for clients are also part of the laboratory requirements.

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology pertinent to the dental hygienists’ role in overall health assessment of clients prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and on-going oral care.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology of the head and neck pertinent to the dental hygienists roll in the overall health assessment prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and ongoing oral care.

CLINICAL PRACTICE
During this series of clinical courses students will provide education and clinical treatment interventions to clients who require simple to complex protocols for maintenance of oral health.

THEORY OF DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE
This theory course supports clinical practice by discussing the elements of the dental hygiene process of care and how to apply it in the assessment, planning and delivery of oral care services to clients. Portions of class time are used to discuss issues related to clinical procedures, progress and performance expectations as students gain greater expertise in clinical skills.

HEALTH STATUS ASSESSMENT
This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and discusses the basic drug groups and their uses. The relationship of drug therapies for systemic illness to the implications for planning and delivery of oral care for clients is emphasized.

ORAL HISTOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY
This theory course introduces students to the study of oral tissues in health and disease at the cellular level. Emphasis is on the process of disease and the body’s natural defense mechanisms to counter damage.

PERIODONTICS
This course examines, in detail, the structures and tissues of the periodontium in health and progressing to states of disease. The factors that initiate and sustain periodontal disease are studied and interventions designed to maintain periodontal health are emphasized. The role of the dental hygienist as a primary health care provider in implementing evidence-based therapies to halt the disease process and assist in regaining and maintaining periodontal health is emphasized. During this course students will explore advanced techniques for treatment of periodontal disease and surgical correction of defects resulting from disease. Emphasis is placed on the collaborative role of the dental hygienist.

DENTAL MATERIALS AND LABORATORY PROCEDURES
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the characteristics of dental materials. The properties, proper manipulation and storage of common materials used in dentistry are studied. The laboratory sessions allow students to manipulate materials and create products related to dental diagnosis and treatment.

COMMUNICATION
This course emphasizes the importance of imparting or recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. The principles of doing academic research to prepare an oral report or to write a paper are studied and implemented. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letters, analytical reports etc.). The student will develop the skill to access relevant and credible resources in order to research a topic of interest to the field of dental hygiene.

DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE STANDARDS
This course introduces students to the ethical and legal responsibilities of dental hygiene practice. Discussion centers around the use of pertinent New Brunswick provincial health regulation legislation, Professional Practice Standards and the Dental Hygiene Code of Ethics as quality control mechanisms to protect the public from receiving substandard care are covered. Remedies available to clients harmed by practitioners are studied. The principles and procedures of employment search will be addressed. Students will learn how to write an effective resume. Strategies for making follow-up contacts with prospective employers and preparing for a job interview will be emphasized.

CLINIC FEEDBACK
During this weekly session students are encouraged to bring topics for discussion from activities and situations which arise during clinical practice. This course provides a regular forum for transfer of pertinent information among students and faculty regarding clinical practice.

COMMUNITY HEALTH
This course introduces the concept of health as applied to groups or populations. The application of the dental hygiene process of care to assess group needs and plan appropriate educational/treatment strategies is discussed. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of statistics as used to assess needs in groups or populations and their use in program planning.

SOCIAL SCIENCE
This course explores human psychological and social development over the life span. Emphasis is placed on the influence of perception, knowledge, needs and motivation on behavior. Students study the mechanisms of behavior in the dental environment and how client behavior can be modified towards habits that foster improved oral health.

ORAL PATHOLOGY
This course concentrates on the oral manifestations of systemic disease and the implications for dental hygiene interventions. Specialized radiographic and laboratory techniques used in diagnosis of oral diseases are discussed. Recognition of the indications of common diseases from diagnostic images is stressed.

PERIODONTICS II
This course is a continuation of Periodontics I (HYG 207). Students learn detailed characteristics of the structures and tissues of the periodontium as periodontal disease continues to create more advanced tissue destruction. Examination of surgical and non surgical phases of periodontal therapy and post operative periodontal health maintenance are emphasized. Treatment modalities are investigated using systematic reviews and position papers from the American Academy of Periodontology. The implications and dental hygiene care of dental implants are examined.

CLINICAL SEMINARS
The implications of medically compromised patients will be examined in relationship to oral manifestations, prevention of problems, and treatment modifications. Discussion of client case studies will expand the students’ understanding of the dental hygiene process of care and provide students with comprehensive information on the clinical management of clients, especially those with special needs, in the planning and delivery of oral care.

BIOSTATISTICS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY
Students learn basic biostatistics and how they are used to make decisions regarding delivery of publicly funded dental services to the community. The use of experimental and non-experimental research designs and statistical analyses in determining community needs, designing programs and evaluating the success of intervention strategies is addressed. Students also learn to read, understand and assess the quality of published research and the importance of this in life-long learning as a practicing professional.

COMMUNICATIONS II
Students learn how communication with peers and health care professionals differs from that with other groups. This course concentrates on completion of secondary research techniques: written and oral presentation of findings designed for peer/professional audiences.

COMMUNITY HEALTH PLACEMENTS
Field placement activities are designed to familiarize students with the realities of dental hygiene practice in specialty settings. Students will prepare for and complete assignments in designated specialties.

ORTHODONTICS THEORY AND LABORATORY
The theory portion of this course discusses the principles of assessment data collection for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Commonly used appliance systems are examined and basics of orthodontic biomechanics and tissue responses to tooth movement are studied. During the laboratory component students practice orthodontic skills on manikins and partners (limited) in simulated clinical exercises.

Course Descriptions

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATION
This course will explore the basic management principle that individual workplace performance affects an organization's success and profitability. Students will learn how to exceed expectations regarding workplace etiquette and professional conduct. Students will also develop the verbal and written communication skills necessary to work effectively and cohesively within their industry.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION
Students in the Business Communication course learn how to plan, organize and write effective “reader friendly” business documents appropriate for use in today’s global business environment. They will learn to write business letters, memos, reports, and electronic messages. Emphasis will also be placed on proper grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure.

CAREER MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to prepare Executive Office Administration Students for a two week On-Job-Training and for continued success in a business environment. Students will prepare a resume, research employment opportunities, and apply for jobs, undertake a job interview, and evaluate their own performance in the job application process.

OFFICE PROCEDURES
This course will provide the Administrative Assistant with the additional knowledge and more opportunity to apply and build on the skills required to succeed in the business office environment. Today's office environment requires professional people who are trained in technical office skills, interpersonal skills, and who can perform the associated duties with confidence, accuracy, and professionalism.

BUSINESS BASICS
This course is designed to introduce students to different aspects of a general business environment. Various topics such as global markets, economic challenges, competitive forces, forms of business ownership, financial management will be covered. This information will provide students with a general understanding of how Canadian businesses operate.

BUSINESS MATH
Students will learn how to perform business math equations both manually and for use with computer software, including: Work with fractions, percents, decimals and ratios, calculate payroll net of all deductions, derive formulas for input into Excel, price products based on markup, discounts, Gross Margin, and also calculate product costing.

ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I
This course will focus on the theory and practice of recording and reporting financial transactions for the purpose of preparing financial statements. The program takes the student through the accounting cycle, bank reconciliations, managing petty cash, internal controls and all types of journals.

COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING
Students will use accounting software (Simply Accounting) which provides a practical, hands-on introduction to Simply Accounting. Students learn how to set up a company’s books, enter historical information, process current transactions, perform month end and year end transactions, and produce financial statements. They will be introduced to the following modules: general, receivable, payable, payroll, inventory and project.

KEYBOARDING
This aspect of the course places emphasis on proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is also placed on speed and accuracy by the development of skills in typing a variety of business documents. Students must reach 50 words per minute in order to graduate.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This course introduces the concepts and principles underlying personal productivity tools that are widely used in business, such as word processing. Students learn basic computer terminology and concepts. Hands-on exercises provide students with experience in the use of personal computers and productivity tools. The student will create documents, format the document, work with graphics in a document, and properly proof the document. This course covers Excel at the introduction stage - how to work with information, change information, create basic math formulas, and create charts. The student will also be introduced to basic concepts of creating a presentation in PowerPoint using the same techniques. Outlook is more than just an email tool - the student will learn how to manage contacts, meetings, and their scheduling calendar.

BUSINESS WRITING
This course is designed to help students upgrade or refresh their knowledge in general business correspondence by reviewing principles of grammar, correspondence writing, and rules of on-line communication.

PAYROLL
This course, which assumes an introductory knowledge of recording financial transactions in accounting on the part of the student, is intended to provide the student with an in-depth knowledge of Canadian payroll practices and procedures. The course will be taught to the Canadian Payroll administration’s curriculum and may lead to the nationally recognized certificate as a Payroll Administer. The contract of employment, employment laws, payroll deductions, payroll taxes and remittances, payroll allowances and benefits to employees, employment insurance, workers compensation, records of employment, payroll recordkeeping, payroll journal entries and end of year procedures will be covered in order to provide the necessary competencies to create and maintain payroll systems.

Course Descriptions

Travel Applications

This program provides travel students the opportunity to gain competency in Microsoft Windows XP and Office 2016. The students become familiar with the operation of Word PowerPoint, and Excel. Students also learn to use the Internet as an effective business tool, regarding social media and travel blogs.

Human Relations and Business Communication

Students are provided with the opportunity to develop effective communication skills. The students prepare a resume, write business letters, and execute oral presentations. In the Human Relations component, emphasis is placed upon learning the skills required to perform effectively in organizations.

Customer Service

This course will provide an understanding of the customer service industry and trends as well as help the student develop the skills and attitudes necessary to become a customer service professional. The importance of communication, problem solving, motivation and customer retention in the changing marketplace is also discussed and the mastery of these skills and abilities is emphasized.

Hospitality Management

Students will learn the characteristics of the hospitality industry. They will study the proper terminology, accommodation sectors, corporate philosophy, departmental and management structures and market segments. This will familiarize the students with the daily operations and provide a general overview of the hospitality components. They will also develop Human Resources, (training and motivational) skills in order to provide a positive and professional experience for our internal and external guests.

Property Management Systems

In this course, students will learn the principles involved in meeting planning, as well as understanding the dynamics and requirements of groups. Students will be introduced to the principle of selling, coordinating and delivering special events to the group market, in both a hotel setting and as an independent business.

Flight Attendant – An Introduction

The student will gain knowledge of airlines policies and regulations, aviation technology, safety and emergency procedures, as well as in-flight service techniques.

Out-of-Country Destination Trip

The trip will give the student broader understanding of the travel experience. Qualifying students are provided the opportunity to participate in one out-of-country trip. Instructors will accompany the students to provide direction and insight.

Worldwide Geography

Students will become familiar with worldwide tourist destinations. Knowledge of major tourist areas, transportation, cultures, local customs, climate and documentation are examined and supplemented through notes, maps, videos and geography textbook.

Air Tariffs & Ticketing

This segment of the course covers domestic, trans-border, and international air transportation. The focus of this course is on researching, understanding and quoting the lowest possible fare to meet the clients’ needs. This course focuses on basic fare calculations including special fares, trans-border and US fares, and an introduction to international fares.

Travel Fundamentals

This section familiarizes the student with the Travel Industry as a whole including package and independent tours, coach tours, cruises, accommodations, ground transportation and travel insurance. Other aspects include rail travel in Canada, US and Europe, laws dealing with Travel & Tourism and a review of how the industry is structured.

Self-Directed Studies

This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire duration of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.

Automated Reservations

This aspect of the course enables the student to obtain a level of proficiency with the Sabre computer reservation system through hands-on training. This enables the graduate to become competent for entry-level positions performing computer reservation work. The skills covered include reservation procedures for airlines, car rentals, hotels, and tour wholesalers, retrieving general information and fares & ticketing.

Food & Beverage Management

This class focuses on the general elements applicable to today's restaurant, cafe, bar & lounge scene. Students are prepared to organize proper floor set and understand flow management, while maintaining and adhering to health and safety codes. Additionally students will learn about proper pricing techniques, in order to receive maximum revenue for their product.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Course Descriptions

Introduction to Early Childhood Education

This course gives students an understanding of the early childhood education field. Aspects of children, families, play, environments, facilitator, partnerships, and quality will be examined in detail. Program variety, issues in the field, and child care regulations will also be discussed, giving students a general overview of what is required to work in this specialized field. 

Interpersonal Relations

This course will introduce students to the principles and practices of the human relationships. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and skill development as they begin to recognize the process of human interaction. Giving and receiving feedback, assertiveness, self-esteem, and conflict resolution are among the topics covered. Focus will be placed on self-exploration and experiential learning. 

Arts & Creativity

During this course, students will explore their own creative and expressive abilities in order to relate, and develop opportunities for children to express theirs. A definition of creativity, various mediums and modes of expression, and the value of artistic display will be examined in detail. 

Infants & Toddlers

Working with infants and toddlers requires a specialized skill set, which will be introduced in this course of study. From birth to age two is a time of rapid development, and consistent care, observation, and responsiveness to their needs is required to ensure the foundation is set for all future learning. The many milestones that are reached during the first two years will be examined, and students will learn how to plan programming appropriate to support children in all areas of development. 

Health

Healthy practices are essential in the early childhood field, and during this course, students will learn what health-promotion is, how to do self-care while working in a demanding profession, and ways to prevent and manage illness. The many safety concerns involving young children will be discussed, including childhood injuries, prevention of abuse, and environmental dangers. Eating habits and food preparation will also be studied, giving students the opportunity to learn how to ensure proper nutrition for children of all ages. 

Preschoolers

The preschool years are a time of extreme creativity. The value of supporting and encouraging play, strategies for enhancing children’s self-expression, and the ways to ensure an appropriate early childhood education experience for 2 to 5 year olds will be studied. Students will have the opportunity to plan programming, organize the environment, and design interest centers, which are essential skills in working with -preschool children. 

Child Guidance

This course allows students to gain an understanding of guiding young children to choose appropriate behaviours for themselves, while using natural consequences and reasonable expectations to lead them toward greater self-control. Prevention of unacceptable behaviour, reinforcement of prosocial behaviour, and methods of assisting children in attaining self-discipline will be examined. The impact of care giving styles, direct and indirect discipline strategies, and classroom management will give students an appreciation of the role they play in appropriate guidance of young children. 

School-Age Children

School-age children are at a unique period of development, struggling to gain independence, while maintaining the security of still being a child. Students will study the developmental issues that are unfolding, while learning to program plan, support, and care for the varying ages and stages inherent in this diverse group. 

Observation & Assessment

Observation and assessment are critical skills when working with young children. Caregivers must practice systematic, objective observation of the children in their care to ensure programming and activities meet all individual needs. Students will gain an understanding of the importance of observation and assessment, what methods of observation can be used, and how to use the data obtained in order to accurately assess a child’s needs. 

Children, Family, and Community

Children are a product of their family and community, and it is essential for caregivers to offer support to the child, as well as parents in their role of primary caregivers. Students will gain an understanding of the diverse family constellations, as well as the characteristics of dysfunctional families and the variables that can put children at risk. When forming a partnership, students will learn to respect the needs of families, and how best to communicate with and involve families. The community supports and resources available will also be examined. 

Child Development

Upon completion of this course, the student will have an overall view of the study of human development, learning about the transition from conception to birth, and the many milestones that cross the life span until adolescence. Physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development will be examined, giving students an understanding of the factors that influence each, and an appreciation of the importance of early foundational support. 

Inclusive Education

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to offer children with special needs the best possible chance for holistic development in a normal living environment. In cooperation with parents and professionals, they will be able to develop, apply and evaluate integrated program plans that will stimulate the children to achieve their development potential and attain the objectives as part of the inclusion process. 

Administration of Child Care Centre

This course is designed to make the student aware of the business and legal requirements for starting a childcare as a business. The students learn the legal steps in incorporating a company in New Brunswick and registering a business name. Students study the provincial regulations for childcare setup and operation. Sources of funding for business start-ups are presented to the students and each student prepares a business plan to support an application for a business loan. 

Business of a Child Care Centre

Upon completion of this course, students will have a greater understanding of the administrative practices that are necessary for a successful childcare operation. The many roles and responsibilities of directors will be discussed, allowing students to better grasp the position and its function. The role of advocacy and professional practice will also be reviewed, giving students the knowledge necessary to lobby for change in a vital field. 

Educational Assistants Fundamentals

This course will give students the knowledge and skills for working within the school setting as an Educational Assistant. It will focus on the role of an EA, strategies for within the school environment, and an overview of possible expectations in this varied position. 

Computer Applications

Students gain competence in Microsoft Word and Microsoft Office software. They learn to use Word, Excel, Power Point, Access and Outlook. The students also learn to use e-mail to communicate productively. 

Principles of Learning

This course introduces the student to a wide variety of applied behavioural techniques used to modify behaviour. The course will assist the student in observing behaviour in an objective and analytical manner. Classical and operant conditioning theories and procedures will be emphasized in a practical manner. In addition, observational learning and cognitive-behavioural procedures will be explored. Effectiveness of treatment procedures and ethical issues will be discussed throughout the course. 

Professional Development & Accountability

This course introduces the student to a wide variety of applied behavioural techniques used to modify behaviour. The course will assist the student in observing behaviour in an objective and analytical manner. Classical and operant conditioning theories and procedures will be emphasized in a practical manner. In addition, observational learning and cognitive-behavioural procedures will be explored. Effectiveness of treatment procedures and ethical issues will be discussed throughout the course. 

New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care

Students will be trained in the curriculum that has been developed for use in all child care centers in New Brunswick. The four goals for early learning and care will be explored, and the implementation of programming to achieve these goals will be introduced. It is a child-focused approach that allows the teacher to provide the support and encouragement for the child’s attainment of their own knowledge in an environment that is diverse, flexible, and inclusive. 

Abnormal Psychology

Students will study the procedure and DSM-V criteria associated with being diagnosed with mental health illnesses. Areas to be explored include, but are not limited to, Conduct Disorder, Mood Disorders, Feeding and eating Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Attachment Disorders. Students will learn the symptoms and behaviours associated with the above mental illnesses, through case studies, videos, and a variety of instructor led demonstrations. Students will explore and research prevention and treatments including psychotherapy, group therapy, psychoeducational therapy, and psychopharmacological treatments

Abuse

This course will educate students on the different forms of abuse inflicted against children. Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of many types of abuse, such as: neglect and psychological, physical, sexual, and abuse associated with the internet. Students will learn how to identify signs of abuse and what to do if they suspect abuse. Risk factors and prevention will also be covered in respect to victims and perpetrators. 

Practicum Placement

Students will have the opportunity to put their theoretical knowledge into practical use during their field placement. With appropriate supervision and guidance, they will manage the daily activities of an educator, EA, or other professional in this field, and will take on the duties and responsibilities that come with the position, giving them an accurate understanding and appreciation of their chosen career. 

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Course Descriptions

Communications

Students will practice and develop verbal skills to effectively control difficult people and situations while learning to respond rather than react to a situation. The course teaches students accurate note taking skills while reinforcing the importance of notes for court purposes. Students will discuss such topics as communications, process and effective communication as it relates to verbal and non-verbal communication. Students will also explore the impact of stereotyping, prejudice and culture on communication.

Bootcamp

This is a physical aspect of the program that is held for the first four weeks of the program. Students are involved in a series of physical activities that are designed to build individual levels of fitness and endurance. As well the cadet will learn the core values necessary to succeed in law enforcement: uniform and deportment, regulation and obligations, and inspection and drill.

Physical Abilities Requirement Evaluation (P.A.R.E)

Students are required to pass the P.A.R.E. test of fitness in order to receive their diploma.

Fitness and Lifestyle

This course is a combination of classroom and practical work. Students will learn to manage their personal lifestyle through explaining aspects of health and wellness. They will be introduced to Canada’s Food Guide and making good food choices, goal setting and time management, self-esteem, attitude and intentions and their role in participation in physical activity. As well, students will participate in an active physical program as they acquire the physical competencies needed to meet the requirements of the profession.

Defense Tactics and Office Safety

The students will learn defensive tactics, control techniques, tackle downs and come along holds used by Police and Corrections officers. Pressure point systems and different methods of restraints will be introduced. Topics covered include: officer safety, handcuffing techniques, searching techniques, martial arts training techniques, incident management intervention models, compliance tools and collapsible baton training.

Policing Operations

Students will be introduced to police/security duties and responsibilities and will participate in scenarios where they apply learned techniques. Students will learn crime scene protection skills, evidence gathering and note taking.

Community Policing

Students will be introduced to the philosophy of Community Policing and the value of creating partnerships in the community as important aspects in the policing sector. Students will be exposed to the culture and make-up of the local community area while becoming an integral member of the police community relationship/partnership process. Oulton cadets volunteer at chosen community events for a total of 20 hours during the year.

Criminal Investigations

During this course students will be introduced to investigative procedures. They will learn the methodology and techniques of observation as they are introduced to crime scene investigation, first officer on the scene, crime scene management, fingerprinting, interview, interrogation, investigations, and law scenarios.

Law

The student is introduced to the Criminal Justice System in Canada. The course examines major theories related to the study of crime and various consequences received by offenders. Topics covered include but are not limited to the Criminal Code, Federal Statues, Provincial Statutes, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom, Youth Criminal Justice Act, Canadian Evidence Act, Use of Force Law, Powers of Arrest, Search and Seizure, Warrants, Driving Offenses, Sexual Offenses, Corrections and Conditional Release Act.

Ethics

Students shall practice ethical decision making during this course. They will gain knowledge and insight to several “code of conducts” and the expectations of their actions in the field. They will explore the importance of ethics and distinguish ethics from law and religion. Students will define various types of responses to ethical situations. Emphasis will be placed on requirements concerning confidentiality in police, corrections and security work. Students will explore aspects of professionalism and its value in the profession.

Correctional Operations

Students will be introduced to the knowledge and skills to maintain security in an institutional setting. The student will acquire knowledge in: key control, inmate movement, internal and external escort, searching, and seizure on contraband, counts, radio procedure, report writing, perimeter security, and situational management model. The student will also learn: problem solving, the CAPRA model of decision making, crisis intervention, effective listening skills, observation techniques, management of emergency situations, hostage taking and forcible confinement, defusing crisis situation, suicide awareness workshop, self-injurious behaviour and report writing. 

 

Canadian Corrections

This course will provide the student an overview of Corrections in Canada by examining various Correctional systems, both federal and provincial. Students will explore corrections and criminal justice systems and community correction. They will cover types of institutions, roles and responsibilities clarification and risk assessment of offenders.

Computer Applications I

Students gain competence in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office software. They lear to use Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access and Outlook. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively.

Psychology of Policing and Corrections

This course will provide the student insight into the study of crime and criminal behaviour while focusing on the various crimes. The course highlights factors that contribute to law enforcement as well as psychological factors that officers face on a daily basis. Students will identify and discuss a variety of psychological disorders and factors that may cause violence and aggression. They will learn effective interviewing techniques and recognize crime partners.

Sociology

This course explores the ever changing laws that govern Canada while focusing on basic knowledge and skills for entry in policing, corrections and general security. The emphasis in this program is in the law, its application and techniques. Students will recognize potential problem areas and the means to control situations. It also prepares students to face the criminal aspect of the social deviances in our community and inside institutions

Practicum

Students will participate in a mandatory Practicum of 420 hours in order to gain first-hand experience and to practice skills and techniques learned.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Course Descriptions

Communications and Ethics

This module will provide the students with knowledge of ethics and law in dentistry and the dental assisting profession. The class will consist of instruction and practical role playing experiences that will allow the student to implement their communication skills in the dental office and with the public.

Communications and Dental Office Administration

Students will gain an understanding of the roles of a receptionist and how to communicate effectively. Understanding the psychology of a patient, the proper maintenance of a patient file, accounts payable/receivable, payroll and insurance form procedures and processing will be taught. Basic banking procedures commonly used will also be covered.

Microbiology

Oral microbiology will focus on the study of microorganisms existing in the oral cavity. Knowledge of microbiology and the role of infectious diseases in the dental office will be covered.

Intro to Clinic

The students will complete the theory required to be able to confidently practice in a clinical setting. Sterilization, disinfection and orientation to the office and clinical set up will be taught and reinforced through clinical experience.

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology

This module will include an orientation to the structures of the human body and the functions within them. Topics covered: parts of the cell to the major body systems and how they work together.

Restorative

Chair side intra-oral procedures and processes will be detailed in a classroom setting, demonstrated evaluated in the clinic. The student will learn to recognize and understand the procedures, instruments and materials used to complete common restorative appointments.

Dental Science

This course will educate the students in dental sciences including embryology, landmarks of the oral cavity and components of the dentition. Applying the information to a clinic setting by demonstrating the ability to complete a patient record will be achieved.

Dental Health and Nutrition

This course will educate the students in dental health, allowing them to recognize, explain, and demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques to their patients. The skills required to perform preventative dental assisting tasks will be demonstrated in a clinic setting as students practice on a typodont, each other and graduate to patient care. This course also covers basic nutrition theory that will allow the student to be able to discuss the relationship between diet and good dental health with their patients. Community dental health projects will be prepared and delivered throughout the year.

Pharmacology and Medical Emergencies

A dental assistant student will gain the understanding of objectives related to the classification of drugs, how they affect dental procedures and how to use drug reference material, including understanding prescriptions. The knowledge and understanding of medical emergencies and how to assist during one of these emergencies is key to a dental practice.

Radiology

Basic principles of physics and radiography will be covered, ensuring that the student understands the importance of radiology and the safety precautions required to operate a dental X-ray unit. Techniques will be taught in class and practical experience will be gained later in the program.

Head and Neck Anatomy/Oral Pathology

This course will provide the student with a detailed description of the head and neck region including theory as it relates to the bones, muscles, nerves, and blood supply. This course will also present the student with material on diseases of the oral cavity and diagnostic information that a dentist would use to determine pathologies. The course consists of classroom material enhanced with a series of instructor handouts and visual materials.

Dental Specialties

This module is comprised of a series of seminars derived from dental specialties. Information will be delivered as it relates to the practice of a dental assistant in any specialty office. The course is supported by a series of guest speakers and office rotations.

Dental Records

Tooth morphology and proper charting will be covered during this module. A clinical chart will be discussed in depth including details on obtaining information and being able to complete a chart in detail. Students will learn how to complete a chart and to understand the importance of being able to communicate the information to the patient.

Laboratory Procedures

Taking place in a lab setting, combined with classroom instruction, students will learn the methods of lab procedures such as taking impressions, pouring and trimming models and preparing custom trays.

Patient Care Clinic

This module will provide the student with the opportunity to learn hands on and be evaluated on all aspects of clinical dental assisting. The complete process of client care will be brought together in a “real” clinic setting as the student schedules patients to be treated in a supervised patient clinic.

Radiology Lab

The student will practice radiology techniques on a typodont, including safety, exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs

Practicum

Five weeks of supervised practical clinical experience will be achieved. Student’s time will be spent in a general dentistry practice and have hands-on practice.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Course Descriptions

Preclinical Theory and Practice

This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of dental hygiene care. Fundamentals of safe dental hygiene practice and instrumentation skills are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students’ development of the skills defined within the dental hygiene scope of practice. Skills are practiced first on manikins and later on classmates in treatment simulation sessions.

Oral Anatomy and Assessment Procedures

This theory course covers the recognition of the basic structures and tissues of the oral cavity in health. Emphasis is placed on procedures required to do oral assessments of clients and record findings using accepted clinical symbols according to professional practice standards.

Dental Health Promotion I and II

This theory course teaches communication techniques to facilitate management of clients in the clinical setting and to foster clients’ learning of self care practices related to general and oral health. The role of nutrition in maintenance of optimal health is discussed. As students progress to the next levels of health promotion they will discusses the physical, intellectual, and socio-economic factors which influence clients’ decisions and actions in maintaining their oral health and accessing oral health care. Emphasis is placed on individualizing oral self care messages for clients across the lifespan. Nutrition and how it relates to total client care is the focus in HYG-402

Radiography I and II

The theory portion of this course introduces students to the history, development and use of radiation in the diagnosis of dental disease. The principles of proper exposure, processing, handling and storage of dental diagnostic radiographs are covered. Radiation hygiene required to protect client and operator from hazardous exposure levels is emphasized. The laboratory portion of the course allows students to refine exposure techniques for standard intraoral views using manikins. Bisecting angle, paralleling and occlusal plane techniques are studied. Clinical simulations with classmates and exposures for clients are also part of the laboratory requirements.

Human Anatomy and Physiology

This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology pertinent to the dental hygienists’ role in overall health assessment of clients prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and on-going oral care.

Head and Neck Anatomy

This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology of the head and neck pertinent to the dental hygienists roll in the overall health assessment prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and ongoing oral care.

Clinical Practice

During this series of clinical courses students will provide education and clinical treatment interventions to clients who require simple to complex protocols for maintenance of oral health.

Theory of Dental Hygiene Practice

This theory course supports clinical practice by discussing the elements of the dental hygiene process of care and how to apply it in the assessment, planning and delivery of oral care services to clients. Portions of class time are used to discuss issues related to clinical procedures, progress and performance expectations as students gain greater expertise in clinical skills.

Health Status Assessment

This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and discusses the basic drug groups and their uses. The relationship of drug therapies for systemic illness to the implications for planning and delivery of oral care for clients is emphasized.

Oral Histology and Pathology

This theory course introduces students to the study of oral tissues in health and disease at the cellular level. Emphasis is on the process of disease and the body’s natural defense mechanisms to counter damage.

Periodontics

This course examines, in detail, the structures and tissues of the periodontium in health and progressing to states of disease. The factors that initiate and sustain periodontal disease are studied and interventions designed to maintain periodontal health are emphasized. The role of the dental hygienist as a primary health care provider in implementing evidence-based therapies to halt the disease process and assist in regaining and maintaining periodontal health is emphasized. During this course students will explore advanced techniques for treatment of periodontal disease and surgical correction of defects resulting from disease. Emphasis is placed on the collaborative role of the dental hygienist.

Dental Materials and Laboratory Procedures

The theory portion of this course introduces students to the characteristics of dental materials. The properties, proper manipulation and storage of common materials used in dentistry are studied. The laboratory sessions allow students to manipulate materials and create products related to dental diagnosis and treatment.

Communication

This course emphasizes the importance of imparting or recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. The principles of doing academic research to prepare an oral report or to write a paper are studied and implemented. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letters, analytical reports etc.). The student will develop the skill to access relevant and credible resources in order to research a topic of interest to the field of dental hygiene.

Dental Hygiene Practice Standards

This course introduces students to the ethical and legal responsibilities of dental hygiene practice. Discussion centers around the use of pertinent New Brunswick provincial health regulation legislation, Professional Practice Standards and the Dental Hygiene Code of Ethics as quality control mechanisms to protect the public from receiving substandard care are covered. Remedies available to clients harmed by practitioners are studied. The principles and procedures of employment search will be addressed. Students will learn how to write an effective resume. Strategies for making follow-up contacts with prospective employers and preparing for a job interview will be emphasized.

Clinic Feedback

During this weekly session students are encouraged to bring topics for discussion from activities and situations which arise during clinical practice. This course provides a regular forum for transfer of pertinent information among students and faculty regarding clinical practice.

Community Health

This course introduces the concept of health as applied to groups or populations. The application of the dental hygiene process of care to assess group needs and plan appropriate educational/treatment strategies is discussed. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of statistics as used to assess needs in groups or populations and their use in program planning.

Social Science

This course explores human psychological and social development over the life span. Emphasis is placed on the influence of perception, knowledge, needs and motivation on behavior. Students study the mechanisms of behavior in the dental environment and how client behavior can be modified towards habits that foster improved oral health.

Oral Pathology

This course concentrates on the oral manifestations of systemic disease and the implications for dental hygiene interventions. Specialized radiographic and laboratory techniques used in diagnosis of oral diseases are discussed. Recognition of the indications of common diseases from diagnostic images is stressed.

Periodontics II

This course is a continuation of Periodontics I (HYG 207). Students learn detailed characteristics of the structures and tissues of the periodontium as periodontal disease continues to create more advanced tissue destruction. Examination of
surgical and non-surgical phases of periodontal therapy and post-operative periodontal health maintenance are emphasized. Treatment modalities are investigated using systematic reviews and position papers from the American Academy of Periodontology. The implications and dental hygiene care of dental implants are examined.

Clinical Seminars

The implications of medically compromised patients will be examined in relationship to oral manifestations, prevention of problems, and treatment modifications. Discussion of client case studies will expand the students’ understanding of the dental hygiene process of care and provide students with comprehensive information on the clinical management of clients, especially those with special needs, in the planning and delivery of oral care.

Biostatics and Epidemiology

Students learn basic biostatistics and how they are used to make decisions regarding delivery of publicly funded dental services to the community. The use of experimental and non-experimental research designs and statistical analyses in determining community needs, designing programs and evaluating the success of intervention strategies is addressed. Students also learn to read, understand and assess the quality of published research and the importance of this in life-long learning as a practicing professional.

Communications II

Students learn how communication with peers and health care professionals differs from that with other groups. This course concentrates on completion of secondary research techniques: written and oral presentation of findings designed for peer/professional audiences.

Community Health Placements

Field placement activities are designed to familiarize students with the realities of dental hygiene practice in specialty settings. Students will prepare for and complete assignments in designated specialties.

Orthodontics Theory and Laboratory

The theory portion of this course discusses the principles of assessment data collection for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Commonly used appliance systems are examined and basics of orthodontic biomechanics and tissue responses to tooth movement are studied. During the laboratory component students practice orthodontic skills on manikins and partners (limited) in simulated clinical exercises.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Course Descriptions

Preclinical Theory and Practice for Long Term Care and Community Practice

This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of care. Fundamentals of safe practice and instrumentation skills for long term care and community practice are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students ‘development of the skills defined within the scope of practice. Skills are practiced first on manikins and later on classmates in treatment simulation sessions. Topics such as WHMIS and infection control are addressed.

Communications I

This course emphasizes the importance of charting/documentation or recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills.

Health Promotion I: Health, Living, and Nutrition

This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living. Students’ progress with their knowledge of health as they discuss the physical, intellectual, and socio-economic factors which influence clients’ decisions and actions in maintaining their health and accessing health care. Emphasis is placed on individualizing self-care messages for clients across the lifespan. Incorporated topics are the principles of nutrition within Canada’s food Guide, medical nutrition therapy, home management techniques and active lifestyle discussions. A component of this course will cover food handling and preparation.

Anatomy and Physiology/Human Diseases I

This theory course discusses human anatomy and physiology, connections between body systems and the terminology to support it.

Growth and Development

This theory discusses the principles of growth and development across the life cycle. Students will gain an understanding that a client needs change as the client progresses through this life cycle.

Clinical Practice-Long Term Care

Students will apply personal care skills in a long term care setting.

Clinical Practice-Community

Students will apply skills learned in the lab setting, in the community.

Preclinical Practice and Theory for Acute Care

This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of care. Fundamentals of safe practice and instrumentation skills for acute care practice are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students development of the skills defined within the scope of practice. Such topics as hospital protocols, isolation techniques and sterilization processing will be discussed.

Palliative Care

Students will explore the concepts of palliation within the support workers scope of practice, examining topics such as client and family needs, spirituality, culture, loss, grief and caregiver support. Included in this course is Palliative Care for Front Line Workers certificate offered through Cancer Care NS.

Communications II

This course has an emphasis on interpersonal skills and will prepare students with more advanced communications competencies that are required in the workplace.  The focus includes multicultural considerations; ethics, stress management, conflict resolution and practical knowledge for inter- professional communication.

Theory of Health Care Support in Mental Health

Students will gain an understanding of the role of health care support teams to specific to the needs of patients and residents experiencing mental health illness. Diseases and disorders in mental health, including those found in aging population will be explored. Included will be Non-violent Crisis Intervention and Alzheimer’s disease and Other Dementia’s Care Course.

Anatomy of Physiology/Human Disease II

This course will introduce human diseases and the fundamentals of homeostatic mechanisms. Mechanisms of disease how alterations affect healthy structure and function will be illustrated through exploring common disease states.
Disease and illness will be discussed.

Disabilities across Life Span

This course will introduce developmental and intellectual disabilities across the human life span. Health Care Support Worker’s roles and responsibilities will be discussed; Adaptive clothing, adaptive devices and special needs will be explored.

Medication Awareness

Students will be introduced to their role in medication awareness across the continuum of care. Common medication terminology, labels, over-the-counter and prescription medications will be discussed.  There is also a lab component where the student will practice assisting the patient with medication administration.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.
 

Course Descriptions

101 Anatomy and Physiology/Human Disease

This theory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology pertinent to the Licensed Practical Nurse. Students are introduced to the structure and function of the human body in health. Students will also be introduced to human disease and medical terminology. 

105 Communications and Interpersonal Skills

Through an interactive classroom environment, the student will gain the basic skills and techniques necessary to communicate appropriately with staff, clients, families and other health care providers. Focus will also be given to the importance of proper documentation and reporting. Also, attention to nursing theories that pertain to communication and basic needs all humans require will be examined. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, and journals, role playing and guest speakers. 

103 Pre-Clinical Theory

Through an interactive classroom setting students will gain knowledge of theory related to the Canadian Health Care System and the foundation of nursing to appropriately deliver care. Students will know and practice the principles behind the skills that will be delivered at the bedside. As well, students will be able to use and understand the terminology used in nursing. 

104 Beginning Nursing Skills Lab

Upon completion of this course the student will be able to perform basic nursing skills that are commonly required in the care of patients. These skills are required in acute, long term and community settings. In addition to classroom theory, the student will have an opportunity to practice and perform skills in the simulation lab. The student must be successful in both the theory and all lab components of this course. 

203 Intermediate Pre-Clinical Theory

This course will be a continuation from semester one focusing on those skills that are more in depth and require a greater skill and knowledge level. Students will learn and practice the principles behind the skills that will be delivered at the bedside. 

107 Care of the Elderly

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the process of care that is brought to the bedside while caring for those clients who are either brand new to life, suffering with life threatening illness or perhaps in the last stages of the dying process.

204 Anatomy & Physiology and Human Disease II

This theory course is a continuation of PN 101 and also discusses the human anatomy and physiology pertinent to the Licensed Practical Nurse role in overall health assessment of clients prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and on-going care. Students are introduced to the structure and function of the human body in health, human disease and medical terminology. 

102/202/302/402/502 Clinical Practice

During this series of clinical courses, students will provide care, education and interventions in practice. Clinics may be held on site or in a variety of agency/clinical settings. Clinics will be sequenced appropriately based on theory material covered. Clinical practice will be experienced in settings including, but not limited to: medical/surgical, maternal, geriatrics, pediatrics, mental health as well as a variety of community settings. *Although some clinic/lab sessions will be on site, students will be responsible for travel and costs associated with relocation, travel and other to access assigned clinical sites. Clinical rotations are scheduled throughout the program. 

207 Nutrition and Healthy Living

This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living and the communication techniques needed to facilitate management of patients in the clinical setting. It also fosters patients’ learning of self-care practices and how these relate to total patient health. Students will also be able to identify and explain the relationship between nutrition and diabetes and describe the effects of this disease due to poor nutrition. 

301 Phlebotomy Nursing Skills

During this lab experience, students will partake in the practical applications of phlebotomy and venipuncture. During this time, students will integrate their knowledge and skills in providing simulated nursing care to fellow students and simulation equipment. The level of care the student will be able to provide will be of a higher level and their critical thinking will be tested. 

206 Introduction to Pharmacology

This course will explore how and why medications are taken, their drug classification and how to document what has been given. Proper terminology and documentation will also be looked at. 

201 Intermediate Nursing Skills Lab

The lab experience will continue to be a time for students to integrate their knowledge and skills in providing simulated nursing care to fellow students and simulation equipment. The level of care the student will be able to provide will be of a higher level and their critical thinking will be tested with each scenario given. 

208 Introduction to Adult Physical Assessment I

This course will provide the student with the opportunity to develop health assessment skills and techniques required to properly obtain a full health assessment of a client. It includes an introduction to a health assessment, components of health interview and guidelines to performing a head-to-toe physical examination. 

308 Adult Physical Assessment II

Through an interactive class, students will gain invaluable skills and techniques required in obtaining a full patient health history along with performing head to toe physical assessments and the possible abnormalities that may be discovered. The student will learn important health promotion and counseling information in order to facilitate patient teaching. 

Safety at Work

  • Non-Violent Crisis Intervention
  • WHIMIS
  • CPR
  • First Aid

303 Phlebotomy

The course will provide the LPN student with a theoretical and working knowledge of specimen collection techniques. The topics covered in this course include: anatomy of the human blood circulation system, safety in phlebotomy, phlebotomy equipment, phlebotomy procedures, specimen consideration and special procedures. 

401 Advanced Lab Skills

This advanced lab course will better equip students to work in the health care field and to safely administer care. The lab experience will continue to be a time for students to integrate their knowledge and skills in providing simulated nursing care to fellow students and simulation equipment during an acute care setting. 

305 Community/Leadership

Concepts of health as applied to groups and populations are explored and applied using the nursing model of care as students develop community health knowledge and apply it is in a series of community programming formats. During this course the student will learn the importance of a professional reputation and the importance of establishing this in their workplace every day.

306 Palliative Care

Through this in depth course the student will gain important knowledge, skills and understanding to enhance the care provided to palliative patients and their families. 

106 Practice Standards for Health Care

Practice standard encompasses many topics including theoretical foundations, nursing leadership, management, and collaborative practices, also critical thinking, nursing informatics, and caring.

307 Intro to Prenatal Care

This course is designed to introduce the student to the specialty of perinatal nursing, which focuses on promoting wellness in the care of women during their reproductive years. The course content emphasizes the “family-centered approach” which incorporates the importance of collaboration with both the woman and her family in order to provide optimal nursing care. During the course, we will address the changing needs of Canadian women during their childbearing years, focusing on cultural diversity and the Canadian health care system. A variety of women’s health issues will be discussed as well as the assessment and planning for pregnancy. 

304 Intro to Psych

Students will actively engage in discussions regarding the practice of all types of care as it relates to psychiatric mental health nursing. This course provides and introduction to the concepts and theories of psychology and to their application to life situations. We will examine illness management through communication and psychoeducation and clinical behavior.

403 Clinical Feedback

During weekly sessions students will bring topics for discussion to class from clinical/ community activities to share learning with classmates and faculty. This will also be a forum for discussing pertinent issues related to patient care, process and placements that are important to address with faculty. Portions of this class will be used to discuss issues related to procedures, practice, progression and performance expectations as students gain more knowledge. 

205 Nursing Process of Care

This course emphasizes the importance of imparting and recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letter and reports). The student will develop the skill to access relevant and creditable resources in order to research topics of interest to LPN’s.

404/405 Mental Health

Through an interactive classroom setting, students will actively engage in discussions regarding the practice of all types of care, as it relates to nursing in mental Health. The theory course discusses all aspects of mental health as it pertains to the Licensed Practical Nurses role. We examine Mental Health Disorders identifying vulnerable populations, intervention strategies and various methods of therapeutic communication. Also discussed are psychopharmacology, mental health assessment and creating a therapeutic environment in-hospital or community. At the completion of this course students will be able to describe and understand all aspects of Mental Health in Canada, and how these practices affect client care.

407 Maternal Child

This theory course discusses the care of women during their childbearing years, the healthcare of children and pediatric development. Students are introduced to maternal and postpartum assessments as well as the care of newborns and their families. The course content emphasizes the “family-centered approach” which incorporates the importance of collaboration with the woman, child and their family in order to provide optimal nursing care. The PN will be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills pertinent to the care of the woman and child that reflects the role of the Practical Nurse. This class is interactive and includes Power Points Presentations, videos, group discussions, individual assignments and tests. 

501 Medication Lab/IV Initiation

This course teaches in a simulated setting the basic concepts of pharmacological theory and the skills necessary to safely administer medications through oral, rectal and injectable sites. Also, the student will learn and practice calculating medication dosages for all medications, the proper administration techniques of IV initiation and its responsibilities and legal implications. They will participate in simulated medication administration. Initiate IV, demonstrate venipuncture on a simulator training arm as well as fellow classmates. 

405 Community Placement Partnership

Students will be integrating themselves into a variety of community health settings in which they will perform health assessments and health education while working alongside this population.

406 Medication Administration

This interactive course will examine Medication Administration as it pertains to the Licensed Practical Nurse in a variety of health care settings. The students will review pharmacology modules from PN 206 and learn the following about various medications: classifications, characteristics, nursing interventions, side effects, routes of administration as well as client and family teaching. Students will combine theory and practicum in both a classroom and lab setting. Students will be evaluated by class participation, assignments, tests and a final exam. 

408 Care of the Surgical Patient

This theory course discusses care of the surgical patient in Canada and the LPN role in overall knowledge of surgical nursing, pre-operative care, peri-operative teaching, post-operative care, wounds, tubing, drains, staples, and sutures removal. This class is an interactive class which includes power points, group discussions, individual and group projects, tests and quizzes. 

503 Research

This course will examine research in health care as it pertains to the Licensed Practical Nurse. This interactive class will explore many topics including the basics of statistics, the use of research methods, analyzing data collection and evaluating published articles. Students will be required to complete assignments, critique research literature and prepare an evidence-based presentation to the class.

505 Medication Pass

This interactive course will explore the advanced methodology of medication administration. The students will review Medication Administration modules from PN 406 and learn the following about various medications: classifications, characteristics, nursing interventions, side effects, routes of administration as well as client and family teaching. Students will combine theory and practicum by applying their knowledge in a clinical setting. 

506 Medication/IV Initiation

This interactive course will explore the advanced methodology of medication administration. The students will review Medication Administration modules from PN 406 and learn the following about various medications: classifications, characteristics, nursing interventions, side effects, routes of administration as well as client and family teaching. Students will combine theory and practicum by applying their knowledge in both a lab and clinical setting. Students will be evaluated by class participation, assignments and tests.

507 Care of Child

This theory course discusses the care of children with chronic conditions or illnesses and how it affects their pediatric development. Students are introduced to the specialized care of children and their families. The course content emphasizes the “family-centered approach” which incorporates the importance of collaboration with the ill or disabled child and their siblings, parents and caregivers in order to provide optimal nursing care. The PN will be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills pertinent to the care of the child that reflects the role of the Practical Nurse. This class is interactive and includes Power Points Presentations, movies, group discussions, individual assignments and tests. 

601 Practicum

Students will be placed in offsite settings for 5 weeks as they become integrated in a real life setting and practice the summative nature of the day to day work of a practical nurse. Students may be required to gain membership to the association in order to perform all duties required for completion of the program.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.
 

Course Descriptions

Medical Terminology

Spelling, pronunciation and meanings of medical terminology are taught in this course. The identification of a medical word through structural analysis (prefixes, root words, and suffixes) also is taught. This course includes an overview of anatomy and physiology, which is learned while studying each body system. Simple, non-technical explanation of medical terms is incorporated with descriptions of anatomy, physiology, and pathology (no previous knowledge of biology is presumed or needed). The student becomes familiar with clinical procedures, laboratory tests, and abbreviations related to each body system and other specialized areas of medicine.

Medical Office Procedures

Students are introduced to proper techniques to ensure patient/client confidentiality; efficiently schedule patient/client appointments; medical ethics; screen, triage, manage incoming and outgoing calls; records management such as creating, maintaining, and proper disposal of medical charts; discuss the importance of security, privacy, and confidentiality of health records and explain how to preserve them; understanding different components of the medical charts; and other administrative office procedures. Students will also learn how to use the Physician’s Manual and simulated billing and order entry software. Also covered are details of the Workplace Health Safety and Compensation Commission of New Brunswick billing system, and private billing procedures. This course will introduce the student to the role of the Medical Administrator/Ward Clerk working in a hospital setting. Basic concepts of pharmacology will be taught and common classification of medications and their therapeutic usages. They will learn how to use drug reference material. The student will be introduced to the patient chart, patient Kardex, basics of hospital information systems, and forms associated with different hospital tests and procedures.

Medical Keyboarding

This aspect of the course places emphasis on proper keyboarding techniques and mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is also placed on speed and accuracy by the development of skills in typing a variety of medical documents. Students must reach 50 words per minute in order to graduate.

Medical Transcription

The student learns to use modern transcription equipment and will develop speed and accuracy during medical transcription. Transcription skills, retention skills, proof- reading/editing medical reports, and the ability to follow oral instructions are practiced. Emphasis is focused on accuracy and speed. The student will learn to efficiently transcribe and create appropriate medical documents such as: history and physical reports, consultations, chart/progress notes, X-ray reports, operative reports, and business letters.

Dental Office Procedures

The student will receive comprehensive education and training in the application of charting, tooth numbering systems, dental terminology, types of dental treatment, dental specialties and complete dental insurance details.

Self-Directed Studies

This module is used by the student who may want to obtain one-on-one instruction with an instructor. This optional module is completed on Friday mornings during the entire duration of the program. The student does not receive a mark for this module as it is optional.

Computer Applications

Emphasis in this area is placed on giving the student competence in Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office software, which is becoming the software of choice for most of today’s medical offices. The student becomes familiar with the operation of Microsoft’s latest office software Office 2013, which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. The student also learns to use E-mail to communicate productively and the Internet as an effective office tool.

Communications for the Medical Professional

This module covers the most important rules of medical grammar, punctuation, capitalization and writing numbers. Students will test their understanding by completing exercises correlating to every rule and subject covered in the module. The module is designed to enhance the confidence of the student as to the mastery of the rules of English grammar and punctuation.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Course Descriptions

Dispensing Theory 

The history of eye glasses and their design is explored along with proper methods and tools used for frame adjustments.  Interpretation of prescriptions and the relationship between frame, lens and prescription selection will be introduced.  As we advance, task specific lens designs, special dispensing considerations and low vision will be covered.  

Fabrication and Dispensing Lab 

This is a practical application based on the knowledge from Dispensing Theory.  Instruction is given on the assembly of spectacles, use of tools and measuring devices.  Students practice frame adjustments and measurements for spectacles and task specific glasses. 

Contact Lens Theory 

This course covers the history of contact lenses, their design, optical theory, materials and contact lens terminology. Instrumentation and fitting procedures for both hard and soft contact lenses and health assessment will be introduced.  Fitting assessments, wear schedules, and indicators for contact lens wear are studied.  Complications due to contact lens wear, special lens fitting considerations and modifications are also covered.

Contact Lens Lab 

This is the practical application of Contact Lens Theory.  Measurements using a keratometer, verification of parameters and the condition of hard and soft contact lenses as well as an introduction to the slit-lamp and its use.   Manufacturing tolerances and specialty lenses will be examined.

Ocular Science 

This course examines the anatomy and physiology of the eye and its surrounding area. Muscles of the eye both internal and external along with their function and dysfunctions will be studied.

Optics 

This is an introduction to physical optics. Lens types, concepts and calculations used for lens fabrication will be explored.  The theory of reflection and refraction, simple optical systems and lens image formation are studied.

Communication and Interpersonal Skills

This is a communications course focusing on verbal and non-verbal communication skills. Cross cultural differences and how to relate to them will be discussed in this course as well.

Professionalism

In this course, students will learn about resume building and interview skills.  They will learn how to use social media as a means of communication in the business word. The professional interaction between the different eye care practitioners and support staff will also be a major focus. Patient/ client interaction will be discussed in regards to patient education and exchange of information.

Sales and Clinical Preparation

This course will focus on customer service and sales skills as well as techniques in approaching optical clients during the sales process.

In-House Clinic and Preceptorship

This course will have two components. The In-House Clinic takes place at the college, at the dispensary supervised by instructors.  The preceptorship takes place at an optical/work place supervised by Licensed Opticians, Optometrists or Ophthalmologists. Logs will be kept of fitting and skills learned. 

Business Entrepreneurship

This is a small business course that will teach students basic business practices while enabling them to prepare their own business plan. This will be accomplished through a mixture of lectures, discussion, case scenarios and self-directed readings.

NACOR Prep

This course will prepare students for the national examination through a combination of written and practical skills. 

Products and Technology

This course will prepare students with product knowledge from multiple optical suppliers and will offer advanced training in specialized technology in the optical field. 

Standards of Practice

This course will look at ethics, legislation, privacy, consent and licensing. Workplace safety regarding current procedures for infectious disease and prevention are also reviewed.

Community Engagement

During this weekly community engagement, topics for journaling will come from activities and situations which arise during the community engagement as a Vision Mate.  Students are required to keep a journal of daily experiences and self-reflect on their progress. Journals will periodically be submitted for instructor review and feedback. This course provides a regular forum for transfer of pertinent information among students, faculty and CNIB regarding the Vision Mate.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Course Descriptions

Anatomy & Physiology

This course introduces the sciences of anatomy and physiology and the basic structure, functions and assessment of the human body in its state of wellness. Integration of systems and maintenance of homeostasis within the body will also be discussed.

Communication and Professionalism

Through an interactive classroom environment the student will gain the basic skills and techniques necessary to communicate appropriately with staff, patients, clients, families and other health care providers and emergency personnel. Focus will also be given to the importance of proper documentation and reporting. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, and journals, role playing and guest speakers. Skills in the class are practiced throughout remaining courses and semesters.

Medical Theory I

Through an interactive classroom setting, students will gain knowledge of theory of organ systems and pathophysiology.  Students will gain an understanding of how the body functions in both normal physiological conditions as well as during disease process and shock states.

Skills Lab I

This course will include an introduction to the skills required to be able to gather patient information, assess the patient's condition, and initiate medical interventions. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to perform basic skills that are commonly required in the care of patients. These skills are required in acute, long term and community settings. The student must be successful in both the theory and all lab components of this course.

Nutrition and Healthy Living

This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living. It also fosters patients' learning and practice of self-care practices and how these relate to total patient health. This class will include in class theory as well as activities.

Clinical & Preceptorship

During this series of clinical courses, students will provide care, education and interventions in practice. Clinics may be held on site or in a variety of agency/clinical settings. Clinics will be sequenced appropriately based on theory material covered. Clinical practice will be experienced in a variety of community and institutional settings in order to introduce students to different populations and health settings.

Community Involvement

Students are provided a Medical First Responder program which allows them to provide medical coverage at public events.  Students are required to obtain 20 medical and 20 non-medical volunteer hours.

Clinical Feedback

This problem based course is based around the student’s experiences during the clinical phase of the program.  Students review patient cases.

Skills Lab II

The lab experience will continue to be a time for students to integrate their knowledge and skills in providing simulated care to fellow students and simulation equipment. The level of care the students will be able to provide will be of a higher level and their critical thinking will be tested with each scenario given.

Specialty Practice Health Care

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the process of care that is required in trauma, mental health and other specialty areas of practice.

Pharmacology

This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and the basic drug groups and uses. Proper terminology and the familiarization of their uses in planning and delivery of care will be discussed. Topics covered will include: drug nomenclature, legal issues, pharmaco-kinetics and principles of pharmacology.

Medication Administration/IV

This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living. It also fosters patients' learning and practice of self-care practices and how these relate to total patient health. This class will include in class theory as well as activities.

Practicum

Students will be placed in offsite settings for 12-16 weeks as they become integrated in a real life setting and practice the summative nature of the day to day work of a paramedic. Students may be required to gain membership to the association in order to perform all duties required for completion of the program. This portion of the program is intended to allow students to gain exposure to a variety of settings under the supervision of a mentor.

Students will be expected to perform effectively as a paramedic team member, demonstration professional patient and inter-professional relationships and work practices.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

*Although some clinic/lab sessions will be on site, students will be responsible for travel and costs associated with relocation, travel and other, to access assigned clinical sites. Clinical rotations are scheduled throughout the program.

*Fees for interim license, provincial registration and licensure and national exam fees are not included. Eligibility for exam writing and licensure for employment is dependent on program accreditation. Students must acknowledge program status.

*Because of the nature of work of a paramedic, understanding the mental and physical demands of the profession is the key to your success.

Additional training to include: Back in Form, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, WHIMIS, and Medical First Responder.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS AND ETHICS

This module will provide the students with knowledge of ethics and law in dentistry and the dental assisting profession. The class will consist of instruction and practical role playing experiences that will allow the student to implement their communication skills in the dental office and with the public.

COMMUNICATIONS AND DENTAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

Students will gain an understanding of the roles of a receptionist and how to communicate effectively. Understanding the psychology of a patient, the proper maintenance of a patient file, accounts payable/receivable, payroll and insurance form procedures and processing will be taught. Basic banking procedures commonly used will also be covered.

MICROBIOLOGY

Oral microbiology will focus on the study of microorganisms existing in the oral cavity. Knowledge of microbiology and the role of infectious diseases in the dental office will be covered.

INTRO TO CLINIC

The students will complete the theory required to be able to confidently practice in a clinical setting. Sterilization, disinfection and orientation to the office and clinical set up will be taught and reinforced through clinical experience.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will include an orientation to the structures of the human body and the functions within them. Topics covered: parts of the cell to the major body systems and how they work together.

DENTAL SCIENCES

This course will educate the students in dental sciences including embryology, landmarks of the oral cavity and components of the dentition. Applying the information to a clinic setting by demonstrating the ability to complete a patient record will be achieved.

DENTAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will educate the students in dental health, allowing them to recognize, explain, and demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques to their patients. The skills required to perform preventative dental assisting tasks will be demonstrated in a clinic setting as students practice on a typodont, each other and graduate to patient care. This course also covers basic nutrition theory that will allow the student to be able to discuss the relationship between diet and good dental health with their patients. Community dental health projects will be prepared and delivered throughout the year.

PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

A dental assistant student will gain the understanding of objectives related to the classification of drugs, how they affect dental procedures and how to use drug reference material, including understanding prescriptions. The knowledge and understanding of medical emergencies and how to assist during one of these emergencies is key to a dental practice.

RADIOLOGY

Basic principles of physics and radiography will be covered, ensuring that the student understands the importance of radiology and the safety precautions required to operate a dental X-ray unit. Techniques will be taught in class and practical experience will be gained later in the program.

RESTORATIVE

Chair side intra-oral procedures and processes will be detailed in a classroom setting, demonstrated evaluated in the clinic. The student will learn to recognize and understand the procedures, instruments and materials used to complete common restorative appointments.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY/ORAL PATHOLOGY

This course will provide the student with a detailed description of the head and neck region including theory as it relates to the bones, muscles, nerves, and blood supply. This course will also present the student with material on diseases of the oral cavity and diagnostic information that a dentist would use to determine pathologies. The course consists of classroom material enhanced with a series of instructor handouts and visual materials.

DENTAL SPECIALTIES

This module is comprised of a series of seminars derived from dental specialties. Information will be delivered as it relates to the practice of a dental assistant in any specialty office. The course is supported by a series of guest speakers and office rotations.

DENTAL RECORDS

Tooth morphology and proper charting will be covered during this module. A clinical chart will be discussed in depth including details on obtaining information and being able to complete a chart in detail. Students will learn how to complete a chart and to understand the importance of being able to communicate the information to the patient.

LABORATORY PROCEDURES

Taking place in a lab setting, combined with classroom instruction, students will learn the methods of lab procedures such as taking impressions, pouring and trimming models and preparing custom trays.

PATIENT CARE CLINIC

This module will provide the student with the opportunity to learn hands on and be evaluated on all aspects of clinical dental assisting. The complete process of client care will be brought together in a “real” clinic setting as the student schedules patients to be treated in a supervised patient clinic.

RADIOLOGY LAB

The student will practice radiology techniques on a typodont, including safety, exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs.

PRACTICUM

Five weeks of supervised practical clinical experience will be achieved. Student’s time will be spent in a general dentistry practice and have hands-on practice.

Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATIONS AND ETHICS

This module will provide the students with knowledge of ethics and law in dentistry and the dental assisting profession. The class will consist of instruction and practical role playing experiences that will allow the student to implement their communication skills in the dental office and with the public.

COMMUNICATIONS AND DENTAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

Students will gain an understanding of the roles of a receptionist and how to communicate effectively. Understanding the psychology of a patient, the proper maintenance of a patient file, accounts payable/receivable, payroll and insurance form procedures and processing will be taught. Basic banking procedures commonly used will also be covered.

MICROBIOLOGY

Oral microbiology will focus on the study of microorganisms existing in the oral cavity. Knowledge of microbiology and the role of infectious diseases in the dental office will be covered.

INTRO TO CLINIC

The students will complete the theory required to be able to confidently practice in a clinical setting. Sterilization, disinfection and orientation to the office and clinical set up will be taught and reinforced through clinical experience.

INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This module will include an orientation to the structures of the human body and the functions within them. Topics covered: parts of the cell to the major body systems and how they work together.

DENTAL SCIENCES

This course will educate the students in dental sciences including embryology, landmarks of the oral cavity and components of the dentition. Applying the information to a clinic setting by demonstrating the ability to complete a patient record will be achieved.

DENTAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will educate the students in dental health, allowing them to recognize, explain, and demonstrate proper oral hygiene techniques to their patients. The skills required to perform preventative dental assisting tasks will be demonstrated in a clinic setting as students practice on a typodont, each other and graduate to patient care. This course also covers basic nutrition theory that will allow the student to be able to discuss the relationship between diet and good dental health with their patients. Community dental health projects will be prepared and delivered throughout the year.

PHARMACOLOGY AND MEDICAL EMERGENCIES

A dental assistant student will gain the understanding of objectives related to the classification of drugs, how they affect dental procedures and how to use drug reference material, including understanding prescriptions. The knowledge and understanding of medical emergencies and how to assist during one of these emergencies is key to a dental practice.

RADIOLOGY

Basic principles of physics and radiography will be covered, ensuring that the student understands the importance of radiology and the safety precautions required to operate a dental X-ray unit. Techniques will be taught in class and practical experience will be gained later in the program.

RESTORATIVE

Chair side intra-oral procedures and processes will be detailed in a classroom setting, demonstrated evaluated in the clinic. The student will learn to recognize and understand the procedures, instruments and materials used to complete common restorative appointments.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY/ORAL PATHOLOGY

This course will provide the student with a detailed description of the head and neck region including theory as it relates to the bones, muscles, nerves, and blood supply. This course will also present the student with material on diseases of the oral cavity and diagnostic information that a dentist would use to determine pathologies. The course consists of classroom material enhanced with a series of instructor handouts and visual materials.

DENTAL SPECIALTIES

This module is comprised of a series of seminars derived from dental specialties. Information will be delivered as it relates to the practice of a dental assistant in any specialty office. The course is supported by a series of guest speakers and office rotations.

DENTAL RECORDS

Tooth morphology and proper charting will be covered during this module. A clinical chart will be discussed in depth including details on obtaining information and being able to complete a chart in detail. Students will learn how to complete a chart and to understand the importance of being able to communicate the information to the patient.

LABORATORY PROCEDURES

Taking place in a lab setting, combined with classroom instruction, students will learn the methods of lab procedures such as taking impressions, pouring and trimming models and preparing custom trays.

PATIENT CARE CLINIC

This module will provide the student with the opportunity to learn hands on and be evaluated on all aspects of clinical dental assisting. The complete process of client care will be brought together in a “real” clinic setting as the student schedules patients to be treated in a supervised patient clinic.

RADIOLOGY LAB

The student will practice radiology techniques on a typodont, including safety, exposing, processing, and mounting radiographs.

PRACTICUM

Five weeks of supervised practical clinical experience will be achieved. Student’s time will be spent in a general dentistry practice and have hands-on practice.

Course Descriptions

WEB DESIGN USING HTML5, CSS3 AND JAVASCRIPT

The emphasis of this module is to teach the students how to build well formatted websites using HTML5 (structure of website), Cascading Style Sheets (look and format), and JavaScript (dynamic user interaction).

Students will learn to:

  • Develop cross-browser (works in all browsers: Firefox, Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari, Opera) websites using XHTML, HTML5 and CSS3
  • Add dynamic user interaction using JavaScript libraries (JQuery, Prototype, Lightbox, etc)
  • Validate user input using JavaScript
  • Upload a Website to their web host
  • Configure a web server (Apache, Internet Information Services) for hosting website
  • Optimize a website for Search Engine Ranking (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.)
  • Create and maintain their own website
  • Optimize document layout for usability and accessibility
  • Validate HTML5 and CSS3 code
  • Work in a team environment with tasks and timelines, deadlines, etc.
  • Use Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 Integrated Development Environment to create websites

Students receive one year free domain name and web hosting to host their personal website, portfolio and projects

BUILDING WEB APPLICATIONS USING PHP AND MYSQL

In this module the students will continue to apply the techniques learned in the previous module (XHTML, HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript) with an emphasis on creating data-driven websites like a Shopping Cart, a Blog, a Content Management System, etc using the PHP web programming language and the MySQL database server.

The students will learn to:

  • Create data-driven dynamic websites using PHP
  • Integrating database content to generate dynamic Web pages
  • Configure the Apache Web server for hosting HTML and PHP websites
  • Use MySQL database server and querying techniques
  • Work in a team environment to build an Online Shopping Cart Website
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, project management skills
  • Use NetBeans Integrated Development Environment to create dynamic websites
  • Use MySQL Administration Tools to manage databases
  • Use the WordPress blogging tool and publishing platform

DATABASE DESIGN AND MICROSOFT SQL SERVER 2012

This module is composed of two parts:

  1. Database Design In this module, students will learn the techniques necessary to design and built a good SQL Server database using Entity Modeling and Relational Design techniques. Students will learn how to use the Microsoft Visio 2010 tool to design database models using the Chen and Crow’s foot models
  2. Querying and Programming a Microsoft SQL Server 2012 database In this module the students will learn how to implement a database from a conceptual model. Student will learn how to query, implement and maintain a database using the SQL (Structured Query Language) language. Students will be using the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio tool.

DEVELOPING ENTERPRISE WEB SOLUTIONS WITH ASP.NET 4.5

This course focuses on using the Microsoft Visual Studio® .NET environment and the Microsoft .NET platform to create an ASP.NET Web application that delivers dynamic content to a website.

The students will learn to:

  • A hands-on approach to build ASP.NET Application for the Web
  • Build dynamic SQL Server data-driven Websites
  • Create customizable Online Shopping Carts, Portals, Blogs, etc.
  • Debug and test ASP.NET web applications
  • Work with ADO.NET Data Sources and Data Controls
  • Create and consume XML Web Services
  • Incorporate AJAX/JQuery technology into ASP.NET applications
  • Validate user input using validation controls
  • Work with Master Pages, skins and themes
  • Authenticate and secure websites
  • Incorporate profiles, personalization, and membership services
  • Configure and deploy website to online hosting services
  • Work in a team environment (with deadlines, deliverables, timelines) to build an SQL Server data-driven Web Application
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, project management skills • Use the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Integrated Development Environment

OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA

This module is divided up into 2 parts:

JAVA CORE PROGRAMMING

In this module, students will learn to build Desktop Applications for different platforms (Windows, Linux, and Macintosh).

Students will learn:

  • The Core Java Programming packages
  • Object oriented software design techniques (Classes, Objects, Interfaces)
  • To design a Graphical User Interface
  • To create data-driven software
  • To use the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment for building desktop applications.

JAVA SERVLETS AND JSP WEB PROGRAMMING

In this module, students will continue applying their knowledge from the Java Core module with an emphasis on building applications for the web.

Students will learn to:

  • Build a data-driven web application using Java Server Pages and Java Servlets
  • Build a Model-View-Controller application
  • Configure Apache Tomcat Web server
  • Package and deploy web applications to web server
  • Create project proposals, project timelines, deadlines, project management skills
  • Use the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment for building websites
  • Introduction to the Spring MVC Framework

Course Descriptions

PRECLINICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE
This course introduces students to the information necessary to maintain an appropriate environment for delivery of dental hygiene care. Fundamentals of safe dental hygiene practice and instrumentation skills are discussed. The laboratory portion begins students’ development of the skills defined within the dental hygiene scope of practice. Skills are practiced first on manikins and later on classmates in treatment simulation sessions.

ORAL ANATOMY AND ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES
This theory course covers the recognition of the basic structures and tissues of the oral cavity in health. Emphasis is placed on procedures required to do oral assessments of clients and record findings using accepted clinical symbols according to professional practice standards.

DENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION I AND II
This theory course teaches communication techniques to facilitate management of clients in the clinical setting and to foster clients’ learning of self care practices related to general and oral health. The role of nutrition in maintenance of optimal health is discussed. As students progress to the next levels of health promotion they will discusses the physical, intellectual, and socio-economic factors which influence clients’ decisions and actions in maintaining their oral health and accessing oral health care. Emphasis is placed on individualizing oral self care messages for clients across the lifespan. Nutrition and how it relates to total client care is the focus in HYG-204.

RADIOGRAPHY I AND II
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the history, development and use of radiation in the diagnosis of dental disease. The principles of proper exposure, processing, handling and storage of dental diagnostic radiographs are covered. Radiation hygiene required to protect client and operator from hazardous exposure levels is emphasized. The laboratory portion of the course allows students to refine exposure techniques for standard intraoral views using manikins. Bisecting angle, paralleling and occlusal plane techniques are studied. Clinical simulations with classmates and exposures for clients are also part of the laboratory requirements.

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology pertinent to the dental hygienists’ role in overall health assessment of clients prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and on-going oral care.

HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY
This theory and laboratory course discusses the human anatomy and physiology of the head and neck pertinent to the dental hygienists roll in the overall health assessment prior to developing evidence based strategies for their initial and ongoing oral care.

CLINICAL PRACTICE
During this series of clinical courses students will provide education and clinical treatment interventions to clients who require simple to complex protocols for maintenance of oral health.

THEORY OF DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE
This theory course supports clinical practice by discussing the elements of the dental hygiene process of care and how to apply it in the assessment, planning and delivery of oral care services to clients. Portions of class time are used to discuss issues related to clinical procedures, progress and performance expectations as students gain greater expertise in clinical skills.

HEALTH STATUS ASSESSMENT
This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and discusses the basic drug groups and their uses. The relationship of drug therapies for systemic illness to the implications for planning and delivery of oral care for clients is emphasized.

ORAL HISTOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY
This theory course introduces students to the study of oral tissues in health and disease at the cellular level. Emphasis is on the process of disease and the body’s natural defense mechanisms to counter damage.

PERIODONTICS
This course examines, in detail, the structures and tissues of the periodontium in health and progressing to states of disease. The factors that initiate and sustain periodontal disease are studied and interventions designed to maintain periodontal health are emphasized. The role of the dental hygienist as a primary health care provider in implementing evidence-based therapies to halt the disease process and assist in regaining and maintaining periodontal health is emphasized. During this course students will explore advanced techniques for treatment of periodontal disease and surgical correction of defects resulting from disease. Emphasis is placed on the collaborative role of the dental hygienist.

DENTAL MATERIALS AND LABORATORY PROCEDURES
The theory portion of this course introduces students to the characteristics of dental materials. The properties, proper manipulation and storage of common materials used in dentistry are studied. The laboratory sessions allow students to manipulate materials and create products related to dental diagnosis and treatment.

COMMUNICATION
This course emphasizes the importance of imparting or recording information in a clear, accurate and concise manner both orally and in writing. The principles of doing academic research to prepare an oral report or to write a paper are studied and implemented. This course stresses professionally-oriented oral and written skills (memoranda, business letters, analytical reports etc.). The student will develop the skill to access relevant and credible resources in order to research a topic of interest to the field of dental hygiene.

DENTAL HYGIENE PRACTICE STANDARDS
This course introduces students to the ethical and legal responsibilities of dental hygiene practice. Discussion centers around the use of pertinent New Brunswick provincial health regulation legislation, Professional Practice Standards and the Dental Hygiene Code of Ethics as quality control mechanisms to protect the public from receiving substandard care are covered. Remedies available to clients harmed by practitioners are studied. The principles and procedures of employment search will be addressed. Students will learn how to write an effective resume. Strategies for making follow-up contacts with prospective employers and preparing for a job interview will be emphasized.

CLINIC FEEDBACK
During this weekly session students are encouraged to bring topics for discussion from activities and situations which arise during clinical practice. This course provides a regular forum for transfer of pertinent information among students and faculty regarding clinical practice.

COMMUNITY HEALTH
This course introduces the concept of health as applied to groups or populations. The application of the dental hygiene process of care to assess group needs and plan appropriate educational/treatment strategies is discussed. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of statistics as used to assess needs in groups or populations and their use in program planning.

SOCIAL SCIENCE
This course explores human psychological and social development over the life span. Emphasis is placed on the influence of perception, knowledge, needs and motivation on behavior. Students study the mechanisms of behavior in the dental environment and how client behavior can be modified towards habits that foster improved oral health.

ORAL PATHOLOGY
This course concentrates on the oral manifestations of systemic disease and the implications for dental hygiene interventions. Specialized radiographic and laboratory techniques used in diagnosis of oral diseases are discussed. Recognition of the indications of common diseases from diagnostic images is stressed.

PERIODONTICS II
This course is a continuation of Periodontics I (HYG 207). Students learn detailed characteristics of the structures and tissues of the periodontium as periodontal disease continues to create more advanced tissue destruction. Examination of surgical and non surgical phases of periodontal therapy and post operative periodontal health maintenance are emphasized. Treatment modalities are investigated using systematic reviews and position papers from the American Academy of Periodontology. The implications and dental hygiene care of dental implants are examined.

CLINICAL SEMINARS
The implications of medically compromised patients will be examined in relationship to oral manifestations, prevention of problems, and treatment modifications. Discussion of client case studies will expand the students’ understanding of the dental hygiene process of care and provide students with comprehensive information on the clinical management of clients, especially those with special needs, in the planning and delivery of oral care.

BIOSTATISTICS AND EPIDEMIOLOGY
Students learn basic biostatistics and how they are used to make decisions regarding delivery of publicly funded dental services to the community. The use of experimental and non-experimental research designs and statistical analyses in determining community needs, designing programs and evaluating the success of intervention strategies is addressed. Students also learn to read, understand and assess the quality of published research and the importance of this in life-long learning as a practicing professional.

COMMUNICATIONS II
Students learn how communication with peers and health care professionals differs from that with other groups. This course concentrates on completion of secondary research techniques: written and oral presentation of findings designed for peer/professional audiences.

COMMUNITY HEALTH PLACEMENTS
Field placement activities are designed to familiarize students with the realities of dental hygiene practice in specialty settings. Students will prepare for and complete assignments in designated specialties.

ORTHODONTICS THEORY AND LABORATORY
The theory portion of this course discusses the principles of assessment data collection for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Commonly used appliance systems are examined and basics of orthodontic biomechanics and tissue responses to tooth movement are studied. During the laboratory component students practice orthodontic skills on manikins and partners (limited) in simulated clinical exercises.

Course Descriptions

Computer Applications (Microsoft Office)

Basic computer concepts, including Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint are taught. Students will also be expected to attain a minimum of 30 words per minute.   

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology

Overview of anatomy and physiology and common diseases in dogs and cats.  Each body system will be discussed along with examples of common diseases and disorders for each body system. 

Veterinary Medical Terminology

Students learn correct medical terminology for use in communicating with other veterinary professionals and clients.  Medical terms will be broken down into roots, prefixes, and suffixes.  Terminology will be presented relating to body systems, common diagnostic procedures, and anatomical directions. 

General Office Administration

This course focuses on the vet assistant’s role in the veterinary practice as a small business.  The roles of various veterinary health care team members are defined.  Office responsibilities of the administrator such as writing memos, letters and preparing for meetings is an integral portion of this course, all general reception duties are described, along with basic office procedures such as inventory and file management.  An introduction to bookkeeping will prepare students to understand basic accounting functions for front office.

Clinical Procedures I

This course will include theory and practice to allow student to learn and practice safe handling, restraint and husbandry of cats and dogs.  Student will identify canine and feline breeds, and learn basic canine and feline behavior. Cleaning, sanitation, and isolation procedures of the veterinary facility will also be discussed.  

Clinical Procedures II

Students will continue to learn, through a combination of theory and labs, basic nursing procedures for dogs and cats.  Data collection and record keeping for in-hospital and outpatients will be described.  Preventative medicine and basic clinical nutrition will also be discussed. This course will discuss the vet assistant’s role in communication and client relations in the veterinary practice, including grief and conflict situations.  Medical records and appointment management will be discussed.  Commonly used veterinary practice software systems will be introduced.  Occupational health and safety issues and professional ethics are also discussed.  

Lab Procedures and Imaging

Combination of theory and practice to introduce the student to basic lab techniques.  Students will also learn to assist the veterinarian or veterinary technician with the production of diagnostic quality radiographs, with an emphasis on radiation safety for staff and patients.  Students will learn how to collect and process samples for diagnostic procedures and how to perform basic diagnostic tests.      

Pharmacology

Students will be introduced to the nomenclature of common veterinary products – their classifications, indications, side effects, and administration routes.  Pharmacy skills include safe handling, record keeping, dispensing and disposal of drug products.  Basic pharmacy calculations are discussed and practiced. 

Surgical Assisting

With a combination of lectures and labs, students will learn aseptic techniques related to surgical procedures.  Students will practice the identification, care and sterilization of surgical and dental instruments.  Students will learn the skills needed to assist with aseptic preparation of the surgical patient and surgical team.  Post-surgical cleanup and disposal of hazardous materials will be discussed. 

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Course Descriptions

Anatomy & Physiology

This course introduces the sciences of anatomy and physiology and the basic structure, functions and assessment of the human body in its state of wellness. Integration of systems and maintenance of homeostasis within the body will also be discussed.

Communication and Professionalism

Through an interactive classroom environment the student will gain the basic skills and techniques necessary to communicate appropriately with staff, patients, clients, families and other health care providers and emergency personnel. Focus will also be given to the importance of proper documentation and reporting. This course will be delivered through lecture, group activities, and journals, role playing and guest speakers. Skills in the class are practiced throughout remaining courses and semesters.

Medical Theory I

Through an interactive classroom setting, students will gain knowledge of theory of organ systems and pathophysiology.  Students will gain an understanding of how the body functions in both normal physiological conditions as well as during disease process and shock states.

Skills Lab I

This course will include an introduction to the skills required to be able to gather patient information, assess the patient's condition, and initiate medical interventions. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to perform basic skills that are commonly required in the care of patients. These skills are required in acute, long term and community settings. The student must be successful in both the theory and all lab components of this course.

Nutrition and Healthy Living

This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living. It also fosters patients' learning and practice of self-care practices and how these relate to total patient health. This class will include in class theory as well as activities.

Clinical & Preceptorship

During this series of clinical courses, students will provide care, education and interventions in practice. Clinics may be held on site or in a variety of agency/clinical settings. Clinics will be sequenced appropriately based on theory material covered. Clinical practice will be experienced in a variety of community and institutional settings in order to introduce students to different populations and health settings.

Community Involvement

Students are provided a Medical First Responder program which allows them to provide medical coverage at public events.  Students are required to obtain 20 medical and 20 non-medical volunteer hours.

Clinical Feedback

This problem based course is based around the student’s experiences during the clinical phase of the program.  Students review patient cases

Skills Lab II

The lab experience will continue to be a time for students to integrate their knowledge and skills in providing simulated care to fellow students and simulation equipment. The level of care the students will be able to provide will be of a higher level and their critical thinking will be tested with each scenario given.

Specialty Practice Health Care

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the process of care that is required in trauma, mental health and other specialty areas of practice.

Pharmacology

This course introduces the principles of pharmacology and the basic drug groups and uses. Proper terminology and the familiarization of their uses in planning and delivery of care will be discussed. Topics covered will include: drug nomenclature, legal issues, pharmaco-kinetics and principles of pharmacology.

Medication Administration/IV

This theory course teaches the fundamentals of healthy living. It also fosters patients' learning and practice of self-care practices and how these relate to total patient health. This class will include in class theory as well as activities.

French  (Université de Moncton)

These courses are designed for beginners through to intermediate French levels. By the end of these five courses students will be expected to have improved basic proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing French. Achieving language levels through U de M learning does not guarantee that the student will be bilingual at the end of the program.  It will progress the student towards achieving a bilingual  status, but students may require further training to be deemed “bilingual” after graduation.

FRLS 1501
FRLS 1502
FRLS 1601
FRLS 1602
FRLS 2501

Practicum

Students will be placed in offsite settings for 12-16 weeks as they become integrated in a real life setting and practice the summative nature of the day to day work of a paramedic. Students may be required to gain membership to the association in order to perform all duties required for completion of the program. This portion of the program is intended to allow students to gain exposure to a variety of settings under the supervision of a mentor.

Students will be expected to perform effectively as a paramedic team member, demonstration professional patient and inter-professional relationships and work practices.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

*Although some clinic/lab sessions will be on site, students will be responsible for travel and costs associated with relocation, travel and other, to access assigned clinical sites. Clinical rotations are scheduled throughout the program.

*Fees for interim license, provincial registration and licensure and national exam fees are not included. Eligibility for exam writing and licensure for employment is dependent on program accreditation. Students must acknowledge program status.

*Because of the nature of work of a paramedic, understanding the mental and physical demands of the profession is the key to your success.

Additional training to include: Back in Form, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention, WHIMIS, CPR and First Aid.

*Content is subject to change by administration as required to meet program and profession standards.

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

 

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Officer
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements                                   

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Canadian Passport

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 19 years of age prior to May of first year
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 19 years of age prior to May of first year
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 18 years of age prior to commencement of Practicum
  • Valid driver’s license
  • Photocopy of birth certificate or proof of Canadian citizenship
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* OR Biology* with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Preparatory courses are required 
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 3-credit university-level Biology course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level Chemistry course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level English course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Aptitude Test
  • Dental Faculty Interview
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED 
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology considered an asset
  • Grade 11 or 12 English considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Completion of a Faculty Interview
  • Completion of the Pre-Admissions Aptitude Test
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of Pre-Enrollment package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* OR Chemistry* with a minimum average of 60%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* is considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Physics* is considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* AND Biology* with a minimum average of 60%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level*
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Preparatory ​courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry and/or Physics* is considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma, or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Credits from university are considered assets
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Aptitude Testing
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical requirements may apply
  • Bilingualism is a definite asset

    * Lower Level courses are not accepted
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* OR Biology* with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Preparatory courses are required 

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum 65% average
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* OR Biology* with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Preparatory courses are required 

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 19 years of age prior to May of first year
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 3-credit university-level Biology course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level Chemistry course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level English course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Aptitude Test
  • Dental Faculty Interview
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

 

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Officer
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements                                   

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Canadian Passport

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 19 years of age prior to May of first year
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 19 years of age prior to May of first year
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 18 years of age prior to commencement of Practicum
  • Valid driver’s license
  • Photocopy of birth certificate or proof of Canadian citizenship
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* OR Biology* with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Preparatory courses are required 
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 3-credit university-level Biology course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level Chemistry course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level English course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Aptitude Test
  • Dental Faculty Interview
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED 
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology considered an asset
  • Grade 11 or 12 English considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Completion of a Faculty Interview
  • Completion of the Pre-Admissions Aptitude Test
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of Pre-Enrollment package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* OR Chemistry* with a minimum average of 60%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* is considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Physics* is considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* AND Biology* with a minimum average of 60%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level*
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Preparatory ​courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry and/or Physics* is considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma, or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Credits from university are considered assets
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Aptitude Testing
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical requirements may apply
  • Bilingualism is a definite asset

    * Lower Level courses are not accepted
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* OR Biology* with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Preparatory courses are required 

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum 65% average
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* OR Biology* with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Preparatory courses are required 

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 19 years of age prior to May of first year
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 3-credit university-level Biology course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level Chemistry course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level English course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Aptitude Test
  • Dental Faculty Interview
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

 

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Officer
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements                                   

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Canadian Passport

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 19 years of age prior to commencement of practicum
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • 19 years of age prior to commencement of Practicum 
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 18 years of age prior to commencement of Practicum
  • Valid driver’s license
  • Photocopy of birth certificate or proof of Canadian citizenship
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* OR Biology* with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Preparatory courses are required 
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 3-credit university-level Biology course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level Chemistry course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level English course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Aptitude Test
  • Dental Faculty Interview
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED 
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology considered an asset
  • Grade 11 or 12 English considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Academic Math Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Completion of a Faculty Interview
  • Completion of the Pre-Admissions Aptitude Test
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of Pre-Enrollment package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    All French Math needs to be level B or C.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* OR Chemistry* with a minimum average of 60%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Academic Math Level* is considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Academic Math Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Physics* is considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    All French Math needs to be level B or C.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* AND Biology* 
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*
  • Grade 11 or 12 Academic Math Level*
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Preparatory ​courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    All French Math needs to be level B or C.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission into a CCAPP-accredited pharmacy technician program requires that:

a. Language proficiency test results that meet the NAPRA Language Proficiency Requirements for Licensure as a Pharmacy Technician in Canada; or

b. Graduation from a high school in Canada with three consecutive, first language English or French courses/credits; or

c. Graduation from a Collège d'enseignement général et professionnel (CEGEP) in Quebec with three consecutive, first language English or French courses/credits; or

d. An undergraduate degree from a university in Canada, whose instruction was provided in English or French.

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Academic Math Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry and/or Physics* is considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

    *Level II or University Prepartory courses are required
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    All French Math needs to be level B or C.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma, or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Academic Math Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • 19 years of age prior to commencement of Practicum
  • Credits from university are considered assets
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Completion of the pre-admissions Aptitude Test
  • Completion of Faculty Interview
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical requirements may apply
  • Bilingualism is a definite asset

    * Lower Level courses are not accepted
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    All French Math needs to be level B or C.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 English*
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* OR Biology* with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Preparatory courses are required 

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum 65% average
  • Grade 11 or 12 Chemistry* OR Biology* with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

    *Level II or University Preparatory courses are required 

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 19 years of age prior to May of first year
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • 3-credit university-level Biology course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level Chemistry course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • 3-credit university-level English course with a minimum "C" grade or equivalent with a minimum 65% average
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Aptitude Test
  • Dental Faculty Interview
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology considered an asset
  • Grade 11 or 12 English considered an asset
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical quotas may be considered


Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma, or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 60%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 60%
  • Credits from university are considered assets
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical requirements may apply

    * Lower Level courses are not accepted.
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    All French Math needs to be level B or C.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Admission Requirements

  • Grade 12 Diploma, Adult Diploma, or GED
  • Grade 11 or 12 Biology* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 Math Foundations Level* with a minimum average of 65%
  • Grade 11 or 12 English* with a minimum average of 65%
  • 19 years of age prior to commencement of Practicum
  • Credits from university are considered assets
  • Meeting with an Admissions Advisor
  • Completion of the pre-admissions Aptitude Test
  • Completion of Faculty Interview
  • Acceptance by the Admissions Committee
  • Completion of the Pre-Enrollment Package
  • Geographical requirements may apply
  • Bilingualism is a definite asset

    * Lower Level courses are not accepted
    Based on New Brunswick Anglophone High School Curriculum.
    All French Math needs to be level B or C.
    For other provincial or international requirements please contact us directly.

Unless they have completed a minimum of three years of study at a school where English is the language of instruction, international students whose first language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency:

  • CAEL – 70
  • IELTS – 7.0
  • TOEFL – 550 paper based, 270 computer based
  • MELAB - 90

Education Pathways

Education Pathways

Oulton College is proud to partner with Crandall University to provide students with a base education (a college education that can be credited towards the completion of a degree!)

Your diploma from Oulton College will allow you to transfer 24 credit hours toward the Adult Degree Completion Program– Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Management

Education Pathways

Oulton College is proud to partner with Crandall University to provide students with a base education (a college education that can be credited towards the completion of a degree!)

Your diploma from Oulton College will allow you to transfer 24 credit hours toward the Adult Degree Completion Program– Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Management.

Education Pathways

Oulton College is proud to partner with Crandall University to provide students with a base education (a college education that can be credited towards the completion of a degree!)

Your diploma from Oulton College will allow you to transfer 27 credit hours toward the Adult Degree Completion Program– Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Management.

Education Pathways

Oulton College is proud to partner with Crandall University to provide students with a base education (a college education that can be credited towards the completion of a degree!)

Your diploma from Oulton College will allow you to transfer 27 credit hours toward the Adult Degree Completion Program– Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Management.

Education Pathways

Oulton College is proud to partner with Crandall University to provide students with a base education (a college education that can be credited towards the completion of a degree!)

Your diploma from Oulton College will allow you to transfer 21 credit hours toward the Adult Degree Completion Program– Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Management.

Education Pathways

Oulton College is proud to partner with Crandall University to provide students with a base education (a college education that can be credited towards the completion of a degree!)

Your diploma from Oulton College will allow you to transfer 27 credit hours toward the Adult Degree Completion Program– Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Management.

Education Pathways

Oulton College is proud to partner with Crandall University to provide students with a base education (a college education that can be credited towards the completion of a degree!)

Your diploma from Oulton College will allow you to transfer 12 credit hours toward the Adult Degree Completion Program– Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Management.

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